Global Diet and Nutrition Meeting

Singapore   March 19-20, 2018

Dr. Shaodong Guo

Dr. Shaodong Guo

Associate Professor
Texas A&M University
USA

Biography

Dr. Shaodong Guo is Associate Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science at Texas A&M University College. He received his Ph.D in Physiology from Peking University, China. Then he completed his postdoctoral research training in Genetics, Biochemistry, and Medicine in the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Harvard University, respectively. Dr. Guo was an Instructor in Medicine at Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School for two years prior to joining the faculty at Texas A&M Health Science Center. Currently, Dr. Guo serves as senior editor for the Journal of Endocrinology and Journal of Molecular Endocrinology, two major official journals of Endocrine Society of Europe, UK, and Australia, and he is the textbook chapter writer for Metabolic Syndrome edited by Rexford Ahima and published by Springer in 2016. Dr. Guo’s research has been funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), American Heart Association, and the National Institute of Health. He is a recipient of ADA junior faculty award, career development award, and Richard R. Lee Award. His work has been published in a number of journals including the JBC, Endocrinology, Hypertension, Diabetes, Circulation Research, AJP, MCB, and Nature Medicine, receiving about 5,000 citations with an h-factor of 34 based on Google Scholar Citation.


Research Interest

Dr. Shaodong Guo's research interests include the mechanisms of insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes, aiming at a nutritional or therapeutic intervention for the treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Dr. Guo has been working on the gene transcriptional regulation of metabolic homeostasis by insulin receptor substrate proteins (IRS) and Forkhead FoxO transcription factors with the hope of understanding how the signaling from insulin via IRS to FoxO proteins plays a key role in many fundamental cellular processes, including cellular growth and metabolism. His lab has taken a multidisciplinary approach in both cell- and animal- based experiments to investigate how different signals regulate FoxO and how dysregulation of the FoxO pathway is involved in the development of chronic diseases.

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