Call for Abstract

Date

May 22, 2020

Location

Paris, France




Scientfic Sessions:

Advanced technologies for 3D printing and additive manufacturing and how these technologies have changed the face of direct, digital technologies for rapid production of models, prototypes and patterns. Because of its wide applications, 3D printing and additive manufacturing technology has become a powerful new industrial revolution in the field of manufacturing. The evolution of 3D printing and additive manufacturing technologies has changed design, engineering and manufacturing processes across industries such as consumer products, aerospace, medical devices and automotive. The objective of this book is to help designers, R&D personnel, and practicing engineers understand the state-of-the-art developments in the field of 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing. 
 

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The world of 3D printing has the possibility of creating a newer, better future. From increasing the effectiveness of foreign aid to creating a more sustainable future. The possibilities presented to us by 3D printers have allowed us to imagine a better future. Unfortunately, the majority of objects that can be created are subject to the size of each respective 3D printer. Therefore, we can only print to a minimal extent. Alternatively, 2016 has seen an incredible advancement in the 3D printing sector. Below, we have curated a list of six innovations that will change the future of business and production.
 
Multi Jet Infusion (MJF) Technology
3D Printing in the Palm of Your Hand
Complex Surgery Procedures at a Fraction of The Cost
Hair On-Demand
Catching A Murderer
 
 
After over a year of research, countless filament spools, and hundreds of hours of printing, our team is proud to present the Ultimate 3D Printing Materials Guide. Covering over a dozen of the most popular materials in use today, this guide will help you select the best material for your next project or improve the quality of your prints with tips from our experts. Use the tags below to quickly sort the materials based on their characteristics, or view our extensive Filament Properties Table for a detailed side-by-side comparison. Once you have selected a material, view a detailed article with pros and cons, hardware requirements, best practices, pro-tips, example projects and more! Whether you’re new to 3D printing or an advanced user looking to experiment with a new material, this guide has everything you need to make the most of your next project.
 
ABS
ABS is a low-cost material, great for printing tough and durable parts that can withstand high temperatures.
 
Flexible
Flexible filaments, commonly referred to as TPE or TPU, are known for their elasticity allowing the material to easily stretch and bend.
 
PLA
PLA is the go-to material for most users due to its ease-of-use, dimensional accuracy, and low cost.
 
HIPS
HIPS is a lightweight material most commonly used as a dissolvable support structure for ABS models.
 
PETG
PET and PETG filaments are known for their ease of printability, smooth surface finish, and water resistance.
 
Nylon
Nylon is a tough and semi-flexible material that offers high impact and abrasion resistance. It is an ideal choice for printing durable parts.
 
Carbon Fiber Filled
Carbon fiber filaments contain short fibers that are infused into a PLA or ABS base material to help increase strength and stiffness.
 
ASA
ASA is a common alternative to ABS and is great for outdoor applications due to its high UV, temperature, and impact resistance.
 
Polycarbonate
Polycarbonate is known for its strength and durability. It has very high heat and impact resistance making it an ideal choice for tough environments.
 
Metal Filled
Metal filled filaments are made by mixing a fine metal powder into a base material, providing a unique metallic finish and added weight.
 

 

The world has seen many intriguing manufacturing technologies so far, however 3D printing has truly grabbed everybody's eye in the course of recent years. Not only does it have the potential to create something through an entirely unique process, but it also has the capability to render some production lines useless. If consumers are able to 3D print their favourite everyday consumer goods using a 3D printer at home, the manufacturing industries will face a serious drawback. On a different note, 3D printing has opened up new opportunities for production, factory maintenance, and R&D, since acquiring spares for a machine has never been easier. 3D printing is an innovation with a blended impression, however a great many people are seeing that the process will exceed the cons.
 
The method has been applied to (and used by) a wide range of industries, including medical technology. Frequently therapeutic imaging procedures, for example, X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and ultrasounds are utilized to deliver the first computerized model, which is in this manner sustained into the 3D printer.
 
It has been forecast that 3D printing in the medical field will be worth $3.5bn by 2025, compared to $713.3m in 2016. The industry’s compound annual growth rate is supposed to reach 17.7% between 2017 and 2025.
 
There are four core uses of 3D printing in the medical field that are associated with recent innovations: creating tissues and organics, surgical tools, patient-specific surgical models and custom-made prosthetics.
 

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3D Printing promises to create complex biomedical gadgets as per PC configuration utilizing patient-specific anatomical data. Since its underlying use as pre-careful representation models and tooling moulds, 3D Printing has gradually developed to make exceptional gadgets, implants, scaffolds for tissue engineering, diagnostic platforms, and drug delivery systems. Fuelled by the ongoing blast in open intrigue and access to moderate printers, there is renewed interest to combine stem cells with custom 3D scaffolds for personalized regenerative medicine. Before 3D Printing can be used routinely for the regeneration of complex tissues (e.g. bone, cartilage, muscles, vessels, nerves in the craniomaxillofacial complex), and complex organs with intricate 3D microarchitecture (e.g. liver, lymphoid organs), several technological limitations must be addressed. In this audit, the significant materials and innovation propels inside the most recent five years for every one of the regular 3D Printing technologies (Three Dimensional Printing, Fused Deposition Modeling, Selective Laser Sintering, Stereolithography, and 3D Plotting/Direct-Write/Bioprinting) are described. Examples are highlighted to illustrate progress of each technology in tissue engineering, and key confinements are recognized to motivate future research and advance this fascinating field of advanced manufacturing.
 

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Polymers are macromolecules made of many rehashing subunits called monomers. These monomers are coordinated by covalent bonds where atoms share electrons being a strong union. The procedure to deliver a polymer is known as polymerization reaction. Thermoplastic polymers are really important in Additive Manufacturing. Thermoplastics are polymers which relax when they are warmed and harden as they cool. These polymers are utilized for plastic 3D prints, prominently Selective Laser Sintering (SLS). There are a few prominent thermoplastics that can be utilized with this procedure, delivering a variety of results depending on their base properties.
 

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The airplane business incorporates a scope of business, modern and military applications, and is included divisions that plan, make, work and keep up the air ship or shuttle. Among the principal promoters of 3D printing, the airline industry is a driving force in the evolution of this technology for both manufacturing end-use parts and prototyping. Airlines depend on 3D printing to alleviate supply chain constraints, limit warehouse space and reduce wasted materials from traditional manufacturing processes. Rapidly producing aircraft parts on demand saves enormous amounts of space, time and money.
 
In fact, minimizing weight is the number one way that aerospace manufacturing companies save money because weight affects an aircraft’s payload, fuel consumption, emissions, speed and even safety.
 
 
Since the early days, 3D printing in automotive manufacturing has witnessed unprecedented industry adoption. With the emerging economical and environmental concerns, there is a pressing need to rethink the way automobiles are designed and manufactured.
 
The automotive industry ought to adapt to this shift in paradigm quickly. This is where 3D printing in automotive design swiftly steps up. 3D printers not only help the aesthetic design of vehicles but it also has the prowess to deliver working prototype in record turnaround time. 3D printing in automotive design fosters innovation, creativity and limitless possibilities; empowering tomorrow’s transportation landscape.
 
Rapid Prototyping: One of the major benefits of 3D printers in automotive design is the empowerment of rapid prototyping in the pre-manufacturing stage. Companies have the possibility of developing everything ranging from scale-models right down to individual component, faster than ever.
 

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Additive manufacturing and robotics. One technology relies on steady, repetitive motion to build each infinitesimal layer, over and over again. The other technology is renowned for its repeatability and control. It's as if they were made for each other. It's a match made in disruptive technology, in the future of manufacturing.
 
Robots are not only enabling additive manufacturing, they're tending 3D printing machines (which are also robotic), automating AM post-processing, and allowing architects to envision new, flexible ways to build the world around us. Expanding our possibilities. These technologies are used to develop machines that can substitute for humans and replicate human actions. 3D robots can be used in many situations and for lots of purposes where humans cannot survive robots can take on any form but some are made to resemble humans in appearance in the acceptance of a 3D robot the approach of minimally invasive techniques in robotics, for the advent intervention.
 
 
DLP (Digital Light Processing) is a similar process to stereolithography in that it is a 3D printing process that works with photopolymers. The major difference is the light source. DLP uses a more conventional light source, such as an arc lamp with a liquid crystal display panel, which is applied to the entire surface of the vat of photopolymer resin in a single pass, generally making it faster than SL. Also like SL, DLP produces highly accurate parts with excellent resolution, but its similarities also include the same requirements for support structures and post-curing. However, one advantage of DLP over SL is that only a shallow vat of resin is required to facilitate the process, which generally results in less waste and lower running costs.
 

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Additive fabrication refers to a class of manufacturing processes, in which a part is built by adding layers of material upon one another. These processes are inherently different from subtractive processes or consolidation processes. Subtractive processes, such as milling, turning, or drilling, use carefully planned tool movements to cut away material from a workpiece to form the desired part. Consolidation processes, such as casting or molding, use custom designed tooling to solidify material into the desired shape. Additive processes, on the other hand, do not require custom tooling or planned tool movements. Instead, the part is constructed directly from a digital 3-D model created through Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. The 3-D CAD model is converted into many thin layers and the manufacturing equipment uses this geometric data to build each layer sequentially until the part is completed. Due to this approach, additive fabrication is often referred to as layered manufacturing, direct digital manufacturing, or solid freeform fabrication.
 

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Among all 3D AM processes, regarding the material capability, powder bed inkjet 3D printing is theoretically able to form any type of metal, polymers, and ceramics as long as the material can be found in powder form with right particle size/shape and good flowability. The choice of binder/ink will be dependent on the material composition. There are two types of ceramic materials that are widely used and have been successfully commercialized with this technology, that is, plaster-based materials and refractory-based materials.
 
Powder bed inkjet 3D printing is one of the most traditional 3D-AM technologies that was invented in 1993 at MIT and exclusively licensed to Z-Corporation in 1995 [47]. Since then, the technology has been extensively used for fabrication of plaster-based ceramic material. In this process, the powder is spread in thin layers (usually 80 to 150 μm) on top of a solid platform and selectively bonded by the action of an inkjet print head, which contain a liquid binder or solvent. The process is repeated many times to build a 3D object layer by layer.
 

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