Agenda

Date

October 16-17, 2019

Location

Singapore City, Singapore

Conference Agenda

Explore your options to connect, learn and be inspired from our speakers

Keynote Session:

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Qiu-he Peng photo

Qiu-he Peng

Astronomy Department, Nanjing University, China.

Title: Explosion of collapsed supernova and hot big bang of the universe driven by magnetic monopoles

Biography:

Qiu-he Peng graduated from Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University at 1960 firstly taught at Peking University for 18 years and then is teaching at Nanjing University. He is mainly engaged in nuclear astrophysics, particle astrophysics, and galactic astronomy research. In the field of nuclear astrophysics, his researches involve neutron stars (pulsars), the supernova explosion mechanism and the thermonuclear reaction inside the star, the synthesis of heavy elements and an interstellar radioactive element such as the origin of celestial 26Al. 225 papers of him have been published.

 

Abstract:

An anomaly strong radial magnetic field near the Galactic Center (GC) is detected . The lower limit of the radial magnetic field at r=0.12 pc from the GC.
 
Its Possible scientific significances are following:
 
The black hole model at the GC is incorrect. The reason is that  radiations observed from the region neighbor of the GC are hardly emitted by the gas of accretion disk due to it being prevented from approaching to the GC by the abnormally strong radial magnetic field.
 
This is an anticipated signals for existence of magnetic monopoles(MM). The lower limit of the detected radial magnetic field is quantitatively in agreement with the prediction of our paper “An AGN model with MM".
 
Magnetic monopoles may play a key role in some very important  astrophysical problems using the Robakov-Callen effect that nucleons may decay catalyzed by MM.
 
Taking the RC effect as an energy source, we have proposed a unified model for various supernova explosion, including to solve the question of the energy source both in the Earth core and in the white dwarfs.

 

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker D. Darminto photo

D. Darminto

Department of Physics, Institute of Technology Sepuluh, Indonesia

Title: Defect - induced magnetism in oxide nanomaterials

Biography:

Darminto is a professor of condensed matter physics at the  Department of Physics, Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember (ITS), Surabaya, Indonesia, with research interests on superconductivity, magneto-electronics, 2D- and nano-materials. Research visits have been conducted on single crystal growing of oxide materials, University of Amsterdam, 1998; on high-Tc Bi-based superconductivity, The University of Tokyo, Japan, 1998–1999; superconducting interfaces and devices, MESA+ Research Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, The Netherlands, 2002–2003; and collaborations on muon based science with RIKEN Nishina Center, Japan, 2007–present; superconducting and magnetic materials with Chiba University, Japan, 2009–2012; materials processing and corrosion with Federal Institute for Material Research and Testing (BAM) Berlin, Germany, 2013–present; neutron scattering and diffraction experiments with National Nuclear Energy Agency, Indonesia, 2005–; synchrotron X-ray experiments with Synchrotron Light Reserach Institute (SRLI) on oxides and carbon based materials, Thailand, 2015–present.

Abstract:

Nano-sized materials are generally characterized by specific features being different from the bulk forms. One of them is weak ferromagnetism or superparamagnetism. This may probably be occurred due to specific surface effects which contribute to the properties of the nanomaterials. Most oxide nanoparticles behave as ferromagnetic materials at room temperature.

This phenomenon is an unusual property for non-magnetic oxides. The non-magnetic compounds commonly exhibit paramagneti cordiamagnetic behavior, but not ferromagnetic one. According to several studies, this magnetism may generally originate from magnetic moments of oxygen vacancies (crystalline point defects) at the surface of the nanoparticles, substitutional defects or dangling bonds. This work is to elucidate the magnetism due to defects in oxide nanomaterials, namely, nano-semiconducting oxides, reduced graphene oxides and nanosized superconductors for both p- dan n-type cuprate systems.

Oral Session 1:

  • Applied Physics and Mathematics | Astrophysics | Atomic, molecular, and optical physics | Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics
Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Thirupathaiah Kola photo

Thirupathaiah Kola

Research fellow, RFIC Research Laboratory, Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, India.

Title: Nanoplasmonic multi band/multi functional devices using MIM waveguide

Biography:

K. Thirupathaiah received his bachelor’s degree from Kakateeya University, M.Sc & M,Tech from Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad (JNTUH) and PhD in Nanophotonics from IIT Roorkee. He has been with the Department of Electronics & Communication Engineering of Marri Laxman Reddy Institute of Technology & Management (MLRITM) since 2015 where, he is now Professor. His research interests are in the general areas of Plasmonics, Nanophotonics, Microwave engineering, THz Frequencies, Metamaterials, Graphene Plasmonics & Microwave. He has published several papers in peer reviewed international journals and participated in several national/international workshops and conferences.

 

Abstract:

Plasmonics is a rapidly evolving subfield of nanophotonics that deals with the interaction of light with surface plasmons, which are collective oscillations that occur at the interface between metal and insulator. Plasmonics meet a demand for optical interconnects  which are small enough to coexist with nanoscale electronic circuits. This research mainly focused on the process of developing dual band plasmonic devices from the concept of nanoscale wireless links, with specific emphasis on synthesizing data from numerical simulation into an accurate, predictive understanding of nanoscale optical phenomena.
 
The realization of nanoscale wireless links requires miniaturized transmitter and receivers. A wireless link operating at single band has limited applications in future due the increased demand of multiple functions using the same system. Thus, we require multiband wireless links to accommodate more than one standards and functions. When multiple functions have to be performed; the single band system will become very complex and power hungry. Multi-band systems can be implemented by parallel, switchable or concurrent configurations. The parallel or switchable configuration suffers from the drawback of bulky circuitry and switching delay in the operation. The concurrent multiband front end provides different standard compatibility with a single circuitry only; hence reduces the circuit size and the power consumption. So far there is no attempt by researchers across the globe to implement this concept in photonic integrated circuits. Probably due to the fact that most of the photonic integrated circuits are developed by using optical waveguides.
 
Although, nanoscale wireless link concept was proposed in 2010; realization of this concept requires individual building blocks and their systematic design methodology. This portion is still not available in the literature. Therefore, there is a strong need to address this issue i.e. design of building blocks for nanoscale wireless links so that in future this concept can be realized. Keeping this research gap in mind, the research reported in this work has been devoted to design and analysis of MIM plasmonic waveguide based integrated circuits for future multifunctional photonic systems.

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Joanna Slawinska photo

Joanna Slawinska

Research Associate, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Title: Data-driven extraction and classification of convectively coupled equatorial waves

Biography:

Joanna Slawinska has a comprehensive multidisciplinary background, including a Masters degree in Physics with a focus on theoretical astrophysics and stellar pulsations, a PhD in Computational Fluid Dynamics for geophysical flows, and postdoctoral research training in Applied Mathematics. Joanna is a postdoctoral associate working on a range of topics, from theoretical development of data-driven methods for dynamical systems, to their subsequent application to various fields of physics. In particular, the current focus of her work is on machine learning techniques for analysis of spatiotemporal patterns of ultrafast spectroscopical data, complex turbulent flows, and more to come.

 

Abstract:

The realization of nanoscale wireless links requires miniaturized transmitter and receivers. A wireless link operating at single band has limited applications in future due the increased demand of multiple functions using the same system. Thus, we require multiband wireless links to accommodate more than one standards and functions. When multiple functions have to be performed; the single band system will become very complex and power hungry. Multi-band systems can be implemented by parallel, switchable or concurrent configurations. The parallel or switchable configuration suffers from the drawback of bulky circuitry and switching delay in the operation. The concurrent multiband front end provides different standard compatibility with a single circuitry only; hence reduces the circuit size and the power consumption. So far there is no attempt by researchers across the globe to implement this concept in photonic integrated circuits. Probably due to the fact that most of the photonic integrated circuits are developed by using optical waveguides.
 
Although, nanoscale wireless link concept was proposed in 2010; realization of this concept requires individual building blocks and their systematic design methodology. This portion is still not available in the literature. Therefore, there is a strong need to address this issue i.e. design of building blocks for nanoscale wireless links so that in future this concept can be realized. Keeping this research gap in mind, the research reported in this work has been devoted to design and analysis of MIM plasmonic waveguide based integrated circuits for future multifunctional photonic systems.

 

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Vladimir G. Plekhanov photo

Vladimir G. Plekhanov

Researcher at Fonoriton Sci. Lab., Garon Ltd, Estonia.

Title: Experimental observation of the residual strong nuclear interaction via renormalization of the elementary excitations energy of solids which are differ by one neutron from each other

Biography:

Vladimir G. Plekhanov was graduated Tartu State University in 1968, Ph. D. (Physics and Mathematics, 1972), Doctor of Science (Physics and Mathematics, 1982). Main interest fields: the origin of the mass (quantization of matter) as well as the experimental manifestation of the mechanism of strong nuclear interaction in the spectroscopy of solids. He is author approximately 200 publications both in English and Russian. 
 

Abstract:

When nuclear physics developed, two new short – ranged interactions joined to the well – known long – ranged interactions of the gravitational and electromagnetic forces. These are the nuclear force, which acts between nucleons (protons, neutrons) and the weak force which manifests itself in nuclear β – decay. The nuclear force is a result of the residual strong force binding quarks to form protons and neutrons. There are a common place in contemporary physics that the strong force does not act on leptons. Our experimental results show the violation of this strong conclusion. Our report is devoted to the description of the significantly new kind manifestation of the residual strong force. We have studied the low – temperature (2 K) optical spectra (luminescence, reflection and scattering of light) of the LiH and LiD crystals which are differ by term of one neutron from each other.
 
In isolators crystals an electron from valence band (Fig. a) is excited into conduction band. The attractive Coulomb potential between the missing electron in valence band, which can be regarded as a positively hole, and electron in conduction band forms exciton which energy En =1s < Eg, where Eg is the energy of the band – to band transition. As demonstrated early most low – energy electron excitation in LiH (LiD) insulating crystals are large – radius excitons. In our experiments we used the samples with clean surface cleaving the crystals in the bath of helium cryostat with normal or superfluid helium. Free exciton luminescence is observed when studied crystals are excited in the midst of fundamental absorption.
 
The spectrum of free exciton luminescence of LiH (LiD) crystals cleaved in superfluid helium consists of narrow phononless emission line and its broader phonon replicas which arise due to radiative annihilation of excitons with the production of one to five LO phonons. At the adding one neutron (using LiD crystals instead LiH ones) is involved the increase exciton energy on 0.103 eV. As far as the gravitation, electromagnetic and weak interaction are the same of both kind crystals it only changes the residual strong interaction therefore a doubtless conclusion is made that the renormalization of the energy of electromagnetic excitation (excitons, phonons) is carried out by the residual strong nuclear interaction.
 
According to quantum chromodynamics electric – like color forces should be confined inside nucleons given that gluons have their emission and absorption in individual colored quarks.  On the other hand, perhaps magnetic – like strong fields are by their very nature difficult to be contained within nucleons and may be could be acting, at least in principle, far beyond nucleon realm.Thus, the direct observation of the residual strong nuclear interaction in the optical spectra of solids open a new avenue in nuclear and elementary particles physics.
 

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Yaser Daanial Khan photo

Yaser Daanial Khan

Yaser Daanial Khan, PhD, University of Management and Technology, Pakistan

Title: A Comprehensive Model for Feature extraction of Proteomic Data as a Tool for more Accurate In-Silico Identification of Proteins

Biography:

Yaser Daanial Khan is accomplished in the field of computer science. He is an associate professor and also Chairman of the department at Department of Computer Science at University of Management and Technology. He has worked in the field of image processing, computer vision, pattern recognition and bioinformatics. He is working on computationally intelligent models that can more accurately and effectively identify proteomic attributes.
 

Abstract:

Proteins are an essential building block of all living beings. Nearly all of the biological functions in eukaryotes and prokaryotes are carried out with the help of Proteins. Proteins are responsible for all metabolic activities. They maintain the cell structure and also perform regulation of living tissues and organ. The Uniprot database lists millions of proteins out of which only few hundred thousands are categorized. Researchers increasingly are understand the significance of in-Silico protein prediction models which greatly simplifies their task by providing a reliable result very quickly and inexpensively as compared to in-Vitro or in-Vivo determination. However, such models make use of computational intelligence and devising such models is a challenging job.
 
This study pertains to development of robust and convincingly accurate model for this purpose. A feature extraction model is proposed that deeply, effectively and efficiently extracts the obscure patterns within the primary structure of proteins to establish inferences regarding its properties. The work also produces assiduous and promising results as compared to other models for various proteomic classifications.
 

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Ranjib Banerjee photo

Ranjib Banerjee

Assistant Professor in Mathematics, School of Engineering & Technology, BML Munjal University, India.

Title: Enhancing synchrony by induced heterogeneity

Biography:

Ranjib Banerjee earned Master and PhD in applied mathematics from Jadavpur University, one of the most prestigious universities in India.
 
His primary research area includes synchronization in chaotic oscillators, complex network, pattern formation, computational mathematics. He published many research papers in reputed national and international journals. He’s an active reviewer of many international journals.

Abstract:

Two identical chaotic oscillators are mediated by a third chaotic oscillator in which a heterogeneity in form of parameter mismatch is being induced. Due to the presence of heterogeneity in the intermediate oscillator, the synchronization threshold between the indirectly coupled distant oscillator reduces, hence the enhancement.
 
The reason of enhancement is found to be the lag synchronization emerged between the mismatched relay oscillator and its neighboring identical oscillator. The mechanism is tested with different one and 2-dimensional arrays of oscillators and found general. Different chaotic systems, such as Lorenz oscillator, Rossler oscillator etc., are used as a dynamical unit for numerical verification of the phenomenon. The phenomenon is found true in different network of oscillators.

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Yukio Tomozawa photo

Yukio Tomozawa

Physics Department, University of Michigan, USA.

Title: The physical metric in general relativity, size of black holes and neutron stars and the existence of dark matter

Biography:

Yukio Tomozawa obtained DSc in 1961 from Tokyo University. He was Assistant at Tokyo University (1956- ), and at Tokyo University of Education (1957-1959): Member at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (1964-1966). He was Assistant Professor (1966- ), Associate Professor (1968- ), Professor (1972- ) and Emeritus Professor (2003- ) at the University of Michigan, USA.

Abstract:

Yukio Tomozawa obtained DSc in 1961 from Tokyo University. He was Assistant at Tokyo University (1956- ), and at Tokyo University of Education (1957-1959): Member at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (1964-1966). He was Assistant Professor (1966- ), Associate Professor (1968- ), Professor (1972- ) and Emeritus Professor (2003- ) at the University of Michigan, USA.

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker S. Arungalai Vendan photo

S. Arungalai Vendan

Associate Professor, Industrial Automation and Instrumentation Division, School of Electrical Engineering, VIT University, India.

Title: Physics of welding for 21st century materials

Biography:

S. Arungalai Vendan works as Associate Professor in Industrial Automation and Instrumentation Division, Dayananda Sagar University, India.

Abstract:

Physics of welding involves terminologies that are confluence of concepts from materials science, metallurgy, arc physics, electromagnetics, mechanical, power electronics and mathematics. Advent of sophisticated materials for versatile applications in industrial sectors demands them to demonstrate key features such as easy machinability and weld feasibility. Joining of materials is important in structures that are complex.
 
Further, the hybrid components in aero parts, defence arms and ammunitions, electric vehicles, flexible electronics etc necessitates the fabrication of structures with dissimilar material joints. Welding processes are chosen based on the material properties and behaviours such as differential thermal coefficients, metallurgical phenomenon, mechanical properties, molecular diffusion patterns and ionization potentials.
 
The identification of a specific joining process is based on the governing process parameters, economic viability and the joining mechanism adopted which may be either through heat/ pressure or with both heat and pressure. The physics of heat generation that may be due to arcs, plasmas, ultrasonic, electric resistance, explosion typically dictates the strength and quality of the weldment along with their metallurgical integrity. The methodology espoused for simplifying the herculean task of process identification for 21st century materials from the insights of physics and governing mathematical equations is discussed. 

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Imane Agmour photo

Imane Agmour

Member of Analysis, Modeling and Simulation Laboratory, Hassan II University, Morocco

Title: Mathematical modeling of fishing bioeconomic model including wind speed effects

Biography:

Imane Agmour is a PhD student in Applied Mathematics at Faculty of Sciences Ben M’sik, Hassan II University, Morocco. She is a Member of the Analysis, Modeling and Simulation Laboratory. Her research interests include complementarity problem, bio-economic models, variational inequalities, generalised nash equilibrium. She is an author of several research studies published at numerous international journals and conference proceedings.

Abstract:

Wind direction and wind speed are the most important parameters involved in the seiners’ fishing activity. The wind creates conditions that are favorable to fishing. In this work, we search to show the influence of the wind speed on the annual profit of purse seiners. We consider a bioeconomic model of marine populations exploited by purse seiners in the southern athletic zone of Morocco. This zone is characterized by major wind speed changes.
 
We calculate the fishing effort and the amount of catch that allows the seiners to have a maximum annual profit taking into account changes in wind speed in the reporting year and the sustainability of the marine populations stocks. We compare our results with those obtained by the" Institut National de Recherche Halieutique (INRH)" (National Institute of Fisheries Research). One of the key results of this study is the great difference seen between the monthly fishing efforts, the catches and the profits calculated under the two constraints: wind speed changes and biodiversity conservation, and those calculated under the only constraint of the biodiversity.

Keynote Session:

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Mohammad Bagher Ghaemi photo

Mohammad Bagher Ghaemi

Department of Mathematics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran

Title: Compactness and nuclearity of psedifferential operators on lp(s1) and Lp(z), p greater than or equal to 1

Biography:

Mohammad Bagher Ghaemi belongs to Department of Mathematics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran. He completed his undergraduate course in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad from October 1983 to July 1987, graduating B.Sc. in Mathematics and Mathematical Education (first class). He completed his Master’s Course in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad from October 1987 to July 1990, graduating Ms.C. in Mathematics (first class). He did his Ms.C. thesis on "Automatic Continuity of Generalized Intertwining Operators".  He pursued his Ph.D. Course in Glasgow University (UK) from March from March 1996 to October 2000, graduating Ph.D. in functional Analysis. He did his Ph.D. Thesis on "Spectral Theory of Linear Operators".

Abstract:

Compactness and nuclearity of psedifferential operators on lp(s1) and Lp(z), p ≥ 1
 
Let Z be the set of all integers and let S1  be the unit circle centered at the origin. Suppose σ be a measurable function on Z × S1. 
 
Then for every sequence in Lp(Z), 1 ≤ p < ∞, we define the sequence Tσa by
 
(Tσa)(n) = 1/2π e−inθ σ(n, θ)(FZa)(θ)dθ, n ∈ Z
 
where FZa is the Fourier transform of a given by ∞
 
(FZa)(θ) = n=∑−∞ a(n)einθ, θ ∈ [−π, π].
 
Assume τ be a measurable function on S1 × Z. Then for all f in Lp(S1), 1 ≤ p < ∞, we define the function Tτ f on S1 by
 
(Tτ f )(θ) = einθτ n∈Z (θ, n)(FS1 f )(n), θ ∈ [−π, π],
 
Functions σ and τ are called symbols of pseudo-differential operators Tσ and
Tτ on Z and S1 respectively.
 
In this article we show that if σ(θ, n) ∈ S1 × Z and there exist C > 0, m ∈ R such that for all n ∈ Z, |σ(n, θ)| ≤  C(1 + n2)mand and for all f ∈  Lp(S1)  the series n= σ(θ, n)f (n), θ ∈ [−π, π] is absolutely convergent, then the pseudo-differential operator Tσ : Lp(S1) −→  Lp(S1),  1 ≤ p < ∞ is compact and bounded. Then we prove similar results for pseudo differential operators on Z. A necessary and sufficient condition for pseudo-differential operators from Lp1 (S1) into Lp2 (S1) and from Lp1 (Z) into Lp2 (Z) to be nuclear are presented for 1 ≤ p1, p2 < ∞. In the cases when p1 = p2, the trace formulas of pseudo- differential operators based on their symbols are given.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Manish Kumar photo

Manish Kumar

Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT(BHU), India.

Title: Salvation Theory as per the GOD's wish

Biography:

Manish Kumar has obtained B.E. (Electrical Engineering) from MNNIT, Allahabad, M. Tech. (Energy Studies) and Ph.D. (Plasma Physics) from IIT Delhi. He has rich experience of more than thirteen years in teaching, research and training. His areas of interest in teaching and research are Hybrid Energy system, Optical fibers, Terahertz Radiation Generation, Photonics, Surface Plasma Waves and Plasma Physics. He has published 10 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial advisory board member. He is OCM of many international conferences of repute and has travelled widely across the globe (Canada, China and Japan etc.) under various international conferences. He has brought under the F.A.S.T. scheme of MHRD a Center for Energy and Resources Development (CERD) for IIT (BHU)). Presently he is working on the project “1.5 MW Integrated Dairy and Smart Hybrid Energy System”. He is working as an Assistant Professor in Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, India.

Abstract:

GOD is the source of power for all energy which is the source of power for Universe/Multiverse. This energy comes from the splitting (fission) or joining (fusion) of zero(GOD) energy. To understand the source of this energy, one must first understand the GOD. GOD is the smallest particle of an element that has the properties characterizing that element. Knowledge about the nature of the GOD grew slowly since the start of civilization. One of the first breakthroughs was achieved by Mahatma Budh. He got enlightment that he realized light as the source of all knowledge under the Bodhisatva tree and gave his first sermon in Sarnath Varansi. Later on genius Albert Einstein proposed mass energy conversion relation through  E = mc2, where m is the mass that get converted into energy which is the source of power for both nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. This theory of existence of GOD was scientifically established by myself in 2016 and atomic energy as well as the gravitational energy is another form of electrical energy along with the creation of particles from electrical energy flow from GOD in space was also established in 2018.
 
The whole universe/multiverse is just based on three fundamental laws viz.
(1) Law of conservation of energy
(2) Law of conservation of momentum
(3) Law of conservation of charges.
 
Understanding the GOD and His purpose through physics thus now is to be focussed for all scientists to understand “What is Life?”. This needs to be addressed urgently so that all souls could derive power from within themselves to realise the truth as this will lead to harmony and humanity in the world in true sense.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Ghassan H Halasa photo

Ghassan H Halasa

Professor of Electrical Engineering, University of Jordan, Jordan.

Title: Another approach to evolution of the universe

Biography:

Ghassan H Halasa has retired from University of Jordan as Professor of Electrical Engineering. His early education was in Physics. He is a Fulbright Scholar at Murray State University in 2004 and a Visiting Professor at Western Michigan University in 2008. Most of his recent published work was in Electrical Engineering in the field of Renewable Energy. Recently, he published a book as an alternative to the Big Bang Theory.

Abstract:

Classical physics confirms that inertial reference frames can exist at any speed including at and above the speed of light. Relativity theory does not exclude inertial reference frame from existing at the speed of light as long as they did not accelerate to that speed from higher or lower speeds. Lorentz transformations restricted masses from reaching the speed of light, but they did not rule out the existence of reference frames at the speed of light.
In a reference frame traveling at the speed of light 13.8 billion years ago , two particles were ejected in the direction of motion in opposite directions with equal momentum and energy. One particle obtained a speed faster than the speed of light which is the electron, while the other came to rest which is the proton.
 
According to Lorentz transformations an observer at rest finds two particles emerging from nowhere propagating in an expanding space. The two particles maneuver to return to the speed of light by attracting one another, unable to reach that speed because of their increased masses; they stop at a distance forming the first hydrogen atom. The speed of the electron in orbit was calculated and found to be 9.9X106 m/s, little above Bohr’s speed. The excess speed from Bohr’s was calculated and found to be kinetic energy converted into heat associated with the newly formed hydrogen atom at a temperature of 1.58x106 degrees Kelvin. 
 
In conclusion, the universe was created from an unobserved location as over-heated hydrogen atoms.

Oral Session 1:

  • Condensed Matter Physics | Nuclear and Particle Physics | Quantum Physics | Computational Mathematics and Scientific Computing
Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Obiyemi Anthony Demilade photo

Obiyemi Anthony Demilade

Obiyemi Anthony Demilade, Statistic Department, Osun State Polytechnic, Nigeria.

Title: Cointegration analysis of multivariate time series model for inflation movement in nigeria

Biography:

Obiyemi Anthony Demilade has been working in Statistics department at Osun State Polytechnic, Nigeria. He carried out his research on co-integration analysis of multivariate time series model for inflation movement in Nigeria.

Abstract:

This paper attempt to study the co-integration analysis of multivariate time series model for inflation movement in Nigeria. The data used for this study was extracted from abstract of statistics of Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) Spanned a period of 10 years (i.e. from 2008-2017).
 
The Johansen co-integration test suggests that there is at least one co-integration vector, which describes the long run relationship between CPI, FPI and NFPI. Furthermore, the accuracy of the model with use of RMSE, MAE, MAPE and Theil’s U statistic shows that the model is accurate for n-step forecasting.Over the time period considered, all the three series showed an increasing pattern, that is, there is sign of non-stationary in each of the series.
 
In order to examine the VAR model, the unit root tests (ADF test), and co-integration analyses were conducted. Unit root tests indicated that all indices are non-stationary at level and are stationary at first difference at 5%  significant level. The Johansen co-integration test suggests that there is at least one co-integration vector, which describes the long run relationship between CPI, FPI and NFPI. Furthermore, the accuracy of the model with use of RMSE, MAE, MAPE and Theil’s U statistic show that the model is accurate for n-step forecasting.
 

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Kumar Gautam photo

Kumar Gautam

Founder & CEO of Quantum Research And Centre of Excellence (QRACE), New Delhi, India

Title: Controllability of quantum system based on perturbation using linear combination of hermitian matrix

Biography:

Kumar Gautam is Founder & CEO of Quantum Research And Centre of Excellence (QRACE) and has experienced as Associate Professor with a demonstrated history of working in the higher education industry. Skilled in Matlab, Quantum computation, Python, Algorithms, and Research. QRACE is an independent incubation centre with a decentralized community of researchers and scientists with noble ideas and global mindsets on a common path to change the way of societal applications. Strong education professional with a Doctor of Philosophy - Ph.D. focused on Quantum gate design based on Schrödinger Dynamics from the University of Delhi, India. He is also an Editor-in-chief of Research Journal of Quantum Computations and Physical Systems (RJQCPS) along with esteemed reviewer of Quantum information processing, Springer and has published good number of Research papers in the field of quantum computation, those paper are SCI Paper in the quantum information processing, Springer and conference paper on quantum gate design.

Abstract:

Quantum dynamics systems model the evolution characterizing physical phenomena at atomic scales. we take a quantum system described by an unperturbation Hermitian and a time dependent perturbation , where are fixed Hermitian operators and are control signals which are real valued function of time. By writing down the solution to Schrödinger equation for the wave function in the form of a perturbation series in the parameter , we determine condition on the operators such that if the perturbation series is taken upto , that there exist control signals . So that for any ,we have . The idea of using a quantum system as a “controller” for another quantum system, originally formulated, has been recently developed in the framework of quantum optical networks. the most interesting developments will be in techniques that go beyond Hamiltonian control: stringent locality constraints, and the necessity of incorporating more control techniques to tackle a single task, make the challenge formidable, and yet extremely intriguing.

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Nikhil Pachauri photo

Nikhil Pachauri

Vice President- QRACE (Quantum Research and Centre of Excellence) New Delhi India

Title: Fractional IMC-PI based optimum drug scheduling for cancer chemotherapy

Biography:

Nikhil Pachauri is Co-Founder & Vice President of Quantum Research and Centre of Excellence (QRACE) and currently working as a lecturer in Thapar Institute of Engineering and Technology, Patiala Punjab. Skilled in Matlab, Control Theory, Python, Algorithms, and Research. Strong education professional with a Doctor of Philosophy - Ph.D. focused on Analysis simulation and control of Non-linear process from the University Of Delhi, India. He is the esteemed reviewer of ISA transaction, Elsevier and has published good number of Research papers (SCI/Scopus) in the field of Process control. He is a member of IEEE, a Lifetime member of VIBHA.

Abstract:

It is widely known fact, that drug used during chemotherapy has an adverse effect on the patient’s body due to its toxic nature. So, a proper drug scheduling is required in order to minimize the toxic effect of chemotherapeutic drugs. Therefore, in this article a fractional IMC-PI with one design parameter based closed loop control is proposed for effective drug scheduling. Fractional IMC- PI is an amalgamation of fractional calculus and classical internal model control (IMC). For comparative analysis, PID, and two degree of freedom PID control schemes are also implemented. The Owl Search Algorithm (OSA) is used to evaluate the optimum value of design parameter of proposed controller. It is revealed from the simulation results that the FOIMC-PI controller delivers an uninterrupted and specific amount of chemotherapy drug dose into the patient body. Further, it is concluded that proposed controller is more robust towards parametric uncertainty in comparison to other controller.

Meetings International - Applied Physics 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Joanna Slawinska photo

Joanna Slawinska

Research Associate, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Title: Vector-Valued Spectral Analysis of Complex Flows

Biography:

Joanna has a comprehensive multidisciplinary background, including a Masters degree in Physics with a focus on theoretical astrophysics and stellar pulsations, a PhD in Computational Fluid Dynamics for geophysical flows, and postdoctoral research training in Applied Mathematics. Joanna is a postdoctoral associate working on a range of topics, from theoretical development of data-driven methods for dynamical systems, to their subsequent application to various fields of physics. In particular, the current focus of her work is on machine learning techniques for analysis of spatiotemporal patterns of ultrafast spectroscopical data, complex turbulent flows, and more to come.

Abstract:

We apply a recently developed framework for spatiotemporal pattern extraction called Vector-Valued Spectral Analysis (VSA). This approach is based on the eigendecomposition of a kernel integral operator acting on vector-valued observables (spatially extended fields) of the dynamical system generating the data, constructed by combining elements of the theory of operator-valued kernels for multitask machine learning with delay-coordinate maps of dynamical systems. A key aspect of this method is that it utilizes a kernel measure of similarity that takes into account both temporal and spatial degrees of freedom (whereas classical techniques such as EOF analysis are based on aggregate measures of similarity between “snapshots”). As a result, VSA has high skill in extracting physically meaningful patterns with intermittency in both space and time, while factoring out any symmetries present in the data. We demonstrate the efficacy of this method with applications to various cases of complex turbulent flows.