International Conference on

Materials Science & Engineering

Rome, Italy   June 25-26, 2018

Program Schedule

Monday, June 25 , 10:00 - 10:40

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Michael Silver photo

Keynote Forum

Michael Silver

American Elements, USA

Title

Challenges for materials science in the 21st century

Biography

Michael Silver is Chairman & CEO of American Elements, the world’s largest company dedicated exclusively to advanced materials & materials science. The company is headquartered in Los Angeles with laboratories & manufacturing in Salt Lake City, Utah; Monterrey, Mexico; Manchester, England; and Baotou, China and warehousing & sales offices in Japan, Brazil, & Germany. Longstanding customers include Siemens, Philips, GE, Apple, Fiat, Boeing, Space X and Tesla. He is considered a pioneer in the fields of green technology, nanotechnology & robotics. Michael Silver has appeared on many television shows & is often quoted in the New York Times, Financial Times & Wall Street Journal. He received his law degree & MBA from USC.

Abstract

Global powers have come to recognize the critical importance of materials science to the future of their economies in the 21st century. China continues to find ways to protect their vast rare earth deposits to encourage domestic development of materials technology in spite of WTO action, while America seeks to protect its materials science intellectual property for similar purposes. African countries with critical deposits often find they create economies that support rebellions and war. Japan and Europe are often caught in the middle. What is the future of materials science as it progressively gets pulled into these geopolitical battle grounds? American Elements and its CEO Michael Silver have been at the forefront of these challenges for over two decades establishing with the Chinese government its global rare earth supply chain in the early 1990s, assisting in the writing of the United Nations rules governing Conflict Minerals in Africa and co-developing the basic raw materials for solid oxide fuel cells, LED lights, quick dissolve powders for the pharmaceutical industry among many other now fully commercialized technologies. Mr. Silver will speak on where the future pitfalls and opportunities are for scientists and companies developing the next generation of materials science technologies.

Monday, June 25 , 11:05 - 11:45

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Amit Goyal photo

Keynote Forum

Amit Goyal

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA

Title

High-performance, heteroepitaxial, nanolaminate device layers on single-crystal-like, artificial substrates and controlled self-assembly of nanostructures within device layers for wideranging electrical and electronic applications

Biography

Amit Goyal is the director of the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary RENEW (Research & Education in Energy, Environment & Water) Institute at SUNY-Buffalo in Buffalo, New York. He is also Empire Innovation Professor at SUNY-Buffalo. Previously he was a UT-Battelle corporate fellow, a Battelle Distinguished Inventor and an ORNL Distinguished Scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratories in Tennessee. He was also the Chair of the UT-Battelle-ORNL Corporate Fellow Council. Goyal is one of the leading scientists world­wide in the field of advanced electronic and energy materials including high temperature superconductors. He has over 85 issued patents. He also has over 350 publications. In 2009, an analysis of citations and papers published worldwide in the last decade in the field of high-temperature superconductivity, in 1999–2009, conducted by Thomson Reuters Essential Science Indicators (ESI), ranked him as the most cited author worldwide during those years. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Inventors.

Abstract

For many energy and electronic applications, single-crystal-like materials offer the best performance. However, in almost all cases, fabrication of single-crystal form of the relevant material is too expensive. In addition, for many applications, very long or wide materials are required, a regime not accessible by conventional single-crystal growth. This necessitates the use of artificially fabricated, large-area, single-crystal-like substrates suitable for heteroepitaxial growth of the relevant advanced material for the electronic or energy application in question. In this talk, details of the fabrication of such substrates will be provided. Heteroepitaxial growth of nanolaminate multilayers and devices on such substrates using a variety of deposition techniques such as pulsed laser ablation, sputtering, e-beam evaporation, MBE, MOCVD, and chemical solution deposition will be reported upon. Application areas that have been demonstrated via the use of such artificial substrates include – oxide high-temperature superconductors, semiconductor materials (Si, Ge, GaAs, CdTe, Cu2O), ferroelectrics (BaTiO3), multiferroics (BiFeO3), etc. In addition, strain-driven self-assembly of second phase nanomaterials at nanoscale spacings has been demonstrated within device layers. Control of heteroepitaxy in lattice-mismatched systems and the effects of strain on self-assembly will be discussed. Such heteroepitaxial device layers on large-area, single-crystal-like artificial substrates are quite promising for a range of electrical and electronic applications.

Monday, June 25 , 11:45 - 12:25

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Augusto Di Gianfrancesco photo

Keynote Forum

Augusto Di Gianfrancesco

European Creep Collaborative Committee, Italy

Title

Materials for advanced ultrasupercritical power plants

Biography

Augusto Di Gianfrancesco has graduated in chemical engineering at University of Rome “La Sapienza” in October 1982, with specialized background in materials science. He was employed at the Centro Sviluppo Materiali (CSM), Rome, Italy since February 1983 until December 2014. He holds Senior Metallurgist and Project Leader positions on “High Temperature Materials”. He was responsible for R&D activities on steels and superalloys for high temperature applications in power generation plants. He was also member of Management Committee of EU Program COST 522-536, co-founder of the European Creep Collaborative Committee and co-founder of the Italian Working Group on Creep Resistant Materials. In addition he has been member of the International Board of the 5th, 6th &7th EPRI International Conferences on Advances in Materials Technology for Fossil Power Plants, METAL2013 / METAL2014 / METAL2015 / METAL2016 / METAL2017 / METAL2018, the 6th International Conference on Creep, Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Interaction, and vice chairman of the 3rd ECCC Conference held 2014 in Rome. He is author and/or co-author of more than 280 technical reports and more than 100 papers presented in national and international conferences or magazines. His current position is Materials and technologies consultant at Compusystem (www.compsyst.it), Chairman of ECCC (European Collaborative Creep Committee) and Vice-president of Center of Study Materials for Energy of Italian Society of Metallurgy (Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia).

Abstract

"Higher process temperatures and pressures are mandatory to increase net efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions”, to follow the results of the COPIT 2016 conference. As consequence of these more severe operating conditions require better materials with higher demands for development, manufacturing and fabrication. This paper summarizes the current status of the art of the materials for ultra-supercritical coal fueled power plants and the trend for the development needed for the next generation called "advanced ultra-supercritical” targeting >50% efficiency, where nickel base superalloys will be necessary for the hottest part of the plant. This new generation of power plants will give an effort for the reduction of the CO2 emission, because forecast confirm the coal will be the
most relevant source for energy production at least for the next 30 years.

  • Advanced Materials and Devices | Metals, Mining, Metallurgy and Materials | Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials | Biomaterials and Healthcare
    Location: Aurelia
Speaker

Chair

Alexander Katsman

Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

Speaker

Co-Chair

Sergi Dosta

University of Barcelona, Spain

Monday, June 25, 12:25 - 13:25

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Eugene Machusky photo

Session Introduction

Eugene Machusky

National Technical University of Ukraine "Kyiv Polytechnic Institute", Ukraine

Title

Quantum alphabet of matter language

Biography

Eugene Machusky is currently head of the Department of Technical Information Protection Systems, scientific director of special design bureau "Storm" in National Technical University of Ukraine "Kyiv Polytechnic Institute" (KPI), Kyiv, Ukraine. He received his M.Eng. in 1974, Ph.D in 1979 and D.Sc. in the year of 1989 from NTUU "KPI". He has been a research visitor at the University of North Wales, Bangor, UK from 1983 to1984 and worked as a visiting professor at Harbin Technological University, China from 2015 to 2018. He has also been an author and editor of Radio Engineering Encyclopaedia (Kyiv 1999; Moscow 2002, 2009, 2016), Great Ukrainian Encyclopedia (2016-2017). His scientific fields of interest includes microwave electronics, underwater acoustics, information security, mathematical linguistics.

Abstract

For the first time, quantum physics was interpreted as a system of information communication, combining calculations and measurements in the framework of differential geometry and the inverse topology of an oscillating 137 polyhedron. As a result, only the functional relationships of the two transcendental numbers PI and E with three unique integers A, R, B were necessary and sufficient for the analytical determination of basic quantum units with practically unlimited accuracy 1/10 ^ 64:

               A = 137 (integer of Sommerfeld),

               R = 105456978 (integer of Dirac),

               B = 602214183 (Avogadro's integer).

The key to quantum computations is the squared sum of arithmetical, geometrical, harmonic and rms: SMS [PI…E] =

[Sqrt((PI^2+E^2)/2+(PI+E)/2+Sqrt(PI*E)+2*PI*E/(PI+E)]^2 =[136.9938985020083593] that very close to 137 = A.

Four matrix equations describe the inverse geometry of simultaneously pulsating and rotating polyhedron:

Relative inverse eccentricity of Sommerfeld

[A] = (100*([R]-1)/2-E)/(1+Sqrt(2*PI*E/100)).

Relative inverse radius of Dirac

[R] = 1+2/100*(E+[A]*(1+Sqrt(2*PI*E/100))).

Relative inverse perimeter of Planck [P] = 2*PI*[R].

Relative density of perimeters of Newton [G] = [P]*(1+[A]).

Six matrix equations describe dynamics of three-dimensional wave fronts motion:

Relative velocity [V] = [R]^64*10^7.

Relative energy [W] = 1+[V]^2.

Relative amplitude displacement [MM] = 12-[A]/10.

Relative phase displacement [KB] = Cos [MM]-Sin [MM].

Relative information entropy [NA] = {Sqrt(8*PI*E/(8*PI*E+A^2))/(1+2*[A]/1000) +5/10^8}/10.

Relative inverse information entropy [DA] =1/[NA]/100.

Ten scaling units coordinate binary [0...1], quantum binary [0.00000000>...1.11111111>], decimal [0...10], quantum decimal [0,00000000>...9.99999999>], alpha [0...137] and quantum natural [0…SMS] computations:

     Integral rotational speed of Maxwell

C = (R/10^8+4*PI*C/10^18)^64*10^7 = [299792457.86759134].

     Integral of Sommerfeld

A1 = 1/A = Sum{729927/10^(8*N) = [0.0072992700729927].

     Inverse integral of Sommerfeld

AS = 1/100/Sum{[A+(A-100)*N]/10^(3*N+2)}= [0.00729].

     Fine eccentricity of Feynman AF = 1000/Integer{1000*Sqrt(A^2+PI^2) = [0.0072973525205056].

     Integral of Avogadro

BS = Sum{B/10^(3*N+11)} = [0.00602817].

     Entropy limit of Avogadro

NB = B/(1+4*PI/10^8)/10^11 = [0.0060221410732354].

     Background temperature limit of Kelvin

K = E+AS+BS = [2.7315999984590452].

     Displacement factor of Wien

X = Root{X*E^X/(E^X-1) = 5} = [4.9651142317442763].

The functional relations of PI and E generate thirteen basic "consonant" of quantum alphabet:

Upper parabolic limit of eccentricity A4 =.(PI*E/100)^2+(1/A-(PI*E/100)^2) = 0.0073189621138002.

Upper hyperbolic limit of eccentricity AH = 1/(16*PI*E) = 0.0073187289405399.

Upper elliptic limit of eccentricity A(NB) =. 0.0073131309589000.

Upper logarithmic limit of eccentricity AL =. 1/(Ln(E)+59*Ln(10)) = 0.0073071361524362.

Hyperbolic symmetry point of eccentricity A1 =. 1/A = 0.0072992700729927.

Biquadratic symmetry point of eccentricity AF = 0.0072973525205056.

Parabolic symmetry point of eccentricity A0 =.  (PI*E/100)^2 = 0.0072927060593902.

Qubit symmetry point of eccentricity AS = 1/100/(1.111111111111>)^3 = 0.0072900000000000.

Upper limit of nuclear radius RC = R/10^8+4*PI*C/10^18 = 1.0545697837673031.

Upper median of nuclear radius RE = R/10^8+1/E/10^8 = 1.0545697836787944.

Lower median of nuclear radius RA = R/10^8+1/(E+AS)/10^8 = 1.0545697836787944.

Lower limit of nuclear radius RK

R/10^8+1/(E+AS+BS)/10^8 = 1.0545697836608581.

Lower limit of eccentricity AX = 5/X-1 = 0.0070261763632109.

Medians of “consonants” generate "vowels" of the quantum alphabet:

Background (‘relic”) temperature TBG = [2.72525432756].

Vibrational tempo T = [2.99792456086] *10^+8.

Translational velocity V = [2.99792456976] *10^+8.

Relative molar mass MR = [0.011999277750].

Boltzmann constant KB = [1.38064845023] *10^-23.

Avogadro constant NA = [6.02214105620] *10^+23.

Atomic mass constant DA = [1.66053898549] *10^-29.

Planck constant PP = [6.62607001111] *10^-34.

Elementary charge Q = [1.60217661502] *10^-19.

Newtonian gravitational constant G = [6.67405289685] *10^-11

Conclusion: The quantum alphabet combines binary (bit), natural (nat), decimal (dit) and alpha (alt) computational systems in the framework of unified non-commutative mathematics. Natural computing creates an absolute metric system and mutually coordinates classical thermodynamics, electrodynamics, chromodynamics and gravidynamics with special and general theory of relativity. All calculated fundamental constants of quantum physics are mutually consistent, more accurate than recommended by CODATA, and can be used as an exact base for the new SI-2019.

Monday, June 25, 14:15 - 15:15

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Sergi Dosta photo

Sergi Dosta

University of Barcelona, Spain

Title

Thermal Spray research developments and possibilities offered at CPT

Biography

Sergi Dosta is working as professor at the University of Barcelona since 2007. His expertise in the materials science and engineering starts in 2003 focused in the Thermal Spray field with nanostructured materials.  He is the technical manager of the Thermal Spray Centre (CPT) since 2010. Dr. Dosta has published more than 80 research papers, has directed 3 thesis and has 20 patents and industrial trade secrets. He is main responsible of 2 european projects from the H2020 and has lead over 50 industrial and research projects. he is the expert in Cold Gas Spray Technology and has been invited to give talks in different conferences and workshops all over the world.

Abstract

The Thermal Spray Center at the University of Barcelona has a wide experience in surface engineering field and specifically working with thermal spray technologies, mainly HVOF and CGS. During all these years it has been developing a wide range of materials from metals to ceramics from traditional high wear coatings to corrosion resistant materials. The center has been focusing on novel materials, including new cermets, intermetallic, polymers or metallic glasses, offering both higher wear resistance and/or new surface properties as it is the case of photo catalysis, considering also super hydrophobic or anti-fouling materials. Some of the new developments and their possible applications will be exposed in this presentation, such as main research lines included in H2020 projects like RIBLET4WIND, HYDROBOND or PROCETS.

Monday, June 25, 15:15-15:40

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Alexander Katsman photo

Alexander Katsman

Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

Title

Mechanisms of metastable phase transformations in Al-Cu alloys with additions of Si, Ti and B

Biography

Alexander Katsman has completed the PhD from Ural State Technical University, Yekaterinburg, Russia in 1985. Since 2010, he has been serving as the senior researcher in Department of Materials Science and Engineering of the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. He has published more than 70 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract

Different metastable phases formed during thermal treatment of Al-Cu alloys were investigated by combination of HRTEM, TEM+EDS and HRSEM techniques. The based Al - 4.97 wt. % Cu - 0.56 wt. % Ag alloy (A201) was modified by different additions of Si, Ti and B. Microstructure and mechanical properties were studied in the as-cast, solution treated (at 550ËšC for ~20 hours) and aged (at 170ËšC up to 32 days) conditions. The precipitation sequence during aging was the following: supersaturated solid solution (SSSS) → GP zones → θ'' → θ' + Ω → θ. During the early stages of aging GP zones are nucleated as single layers of Cu parallel to {100} planes of the α-Al matrix. Then these GP zones are united and generate the metastable θ''- CuAl3 phase consisting of several single atomic layers of Cu, each of them separated by three atomic layers of Al. The Ag, Ti and B additions resulted in nucleation of metastable semi-coherent Ω phase formed at {111} α-Al planes. The Si addition increased nucleation of GP zones and inhibited Ω phase. The following aging resulted in θ" transformation to semi-coherent metastable θ'- CuAl2. The mechanism of this transformation is discussed The next step of microstructure evolution is diffusional dissolution of θ'' precipitates in the presence of more stable θ' and Ω phases. The maximum microhardness corresponded to simultaneous formation of semi-coherent θ' and Ω precipitates. After extended aging, the θ' transforms to stable incoherent BCT θ-phase.

Monday, June 25, 15:40-16:05

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Jaroslav Capek photo

Jaroslav Capek

Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic

Title

The texture of zinc after direct extrusion

Biography

Jaroslav Capek has completed his PhD in metallurgy at The University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic in November 2016 at the age of 31 years. Currently he is working as a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic. He has published more than 15 papers in impacted journals and possesses h-index 7 (according to WOS).

Abstract

Zinc belongs to metals with hexagonal closed packed structure (hcp); therefore, it possesses low plasticity, especially in the as-cast state. Because zinc based materials have been studied as potential biodegradable materials, there is a big interest in improving their mechanical properties. That can be done using thermomechanical treatment, for example by direct extrusion. In the case of extruded hcp metals, e.g. magnesium, significant texture of the products is observed (basal planes are parallel to the extrusion direction). Therefore, a similar effect of direct extrusion on zinc texture can be expected. On the other hand, zinc possesses a c/a ratio higher than √3 meaning that deformation mechanisms are limited only to basal slip and twinning at room temperature. Although the direct extrusion is usually performed at elevated temperatures
and other deformation mechanisms can be activated, some differences may be observed compared to the hcp metals with lower c/a ratio (e.g. magnesium). In this work we produced a zinc wire with a diameter of 250 μm by a one-step direct extrusion with an extrusion ratio of 576 and we studied its microstructure using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction. To understand the microstructure evolution during the direct extrusion better, we extruded zinc single crystals in various directions and observed their microstructure too. We also performed some other tests in order to find the mechanisms of microstructure evolution during the direct extrusion. We would like to thank to the Czech Science Foundation for the financial support of this research (project no. 18-06110S).

Monday, June 25, 16:20-16:45

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Allal Barroug photo

Allal Barroug

Cadi Ayyad University, Morocco

Title

Controlled adsorption and release onto/from calcium phosphate materials for medical applications: The example of a bisphosphonate

Biography

Allal Barroug has completed the bachelor of chemistry in 1979 from Mohamed V University of Rabat in Morocco, a third cycle doctorate in1982 on materials science from the National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse in France and a PhD in1989 on chemistry of interfaces from the Catholic University of Louvain-La-Neuve in Belgium. He is the professor at Cadi Ayyad University of Marrakech in Morocco and his research interests focus on the surface properties of apatites materials and bio-composites. His awards from Harvard Medical School of Boston in USA took him as a senior research scientist to work on “Apatites as local delivery system for anti-cancer drugs”. Allal Barroug published over 60 articles in peer reviewed journals and conferences proceedings, and he is serving as a reviewer of many reputed journals.

Abstract

The surface reactivity of biological apatites has received major attention in the medical field during the last decades, mainly for their physicochemical and biological properties. Thus, numerous studies have been devoted to develop biomaterials based on calcium phosphates as carriers to deliver therapeutic agents in the skeletal systems. In this context, the present study reports on the in vitro basic binding and release of hydroxyapatite and a bisphosphonate molecule, in order to throw light on the main driving forces at the mineral surface. The adsorption from dilute solutions revealed that the uptake of risedronate was inhibited in presence of excess of phosphate species in solution, due to their competition for adsorbing sites on the apatite surface. Conversely, the uptake of the bisphosphonate molecule was accompanied by the release of phosphate ions in the solution. Besides, the molecules bound to apatite crystals were not removed by simple dilution of the equilibrium solution, while the adsorbed molecules can only be displaced by a reverse action of phosphate ions. These observations suggest that the uptake process can be described by an ion exchange mechanism, involving the functional groups of the molecules and the ionic groups at the apatite surface. Whoever, the interaction appears to be reactive for concentrated solutions and the adsorption reaction could then be described as a dissolutionreprecipitation phenomenon. Thus, the control of the uptake and release processes could be useful to develop ‘‘smart delivery systems’’ of therapeutic substances from apatitic biomaterials in vivo.

Monday, June 25, 16:45-17:10

Mohamed Bensaidi

Djillali Liabes University, Algeria

Title

Preparation of SnO2/ ZnO composite thin films: Structural and optical characterizations and comparison with Brugmann model

Biography

Mohamed Bensaidi is working in chemistry of wells at Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Djilali Liabes University, Algeria since 2011. He has completed his grad¬uation in chemistry in the year of 2008 and post-graduation in water chemistry and sustainable development in the year of 2013. His research interest includes organic, inorganic, analytical chemistry and water chemistry.

Abstract

(SnO2) x (ZnO) 1−x composite coated films were deposited on glass substrate by spray pyrolysis method at the temperature of 350 °C. The structural details of composite films were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Optical properties of the deposited films were obtained using transmittance measurements in the wavelength range [200–2500 nm]. The direct optical band gap value of these films varies from 3.1 to 3.7 eV. The effective dielectric functions of the composite films as a function of the volume fraction are deduced using the Brugmann effective medium theory. The real and imaginary spectra resulting from these are compared with the experimental spectra. The results demonstrate that the Brugmann theory can adequately interpret the optical properties of the composite, indicating that an accurate tailoring of the composite optical properties can take place by varying the composite volume fraction.

Tuesday, June 26 , 10:00-10:40

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Eui-Hyeok Yang photo

Keynote Forum

Eui-Hyeok Yang

Stevens Institute of Technology, USA

Title

2D Flatlands – Synthesis, characterization and applications

Biography

Eui-Hyeok Yang is a full professor of Mechanical Engineering Department at Stevens Institute of Technology, USA. He received his Ph.D. degree from Ajou University, Korea. After his postdoctoral training at University of Tokyo and at California Institute of Technology, he joined NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) where he became a senior member of the engineering staff. In recognition of his excellence in advancing the use of MEMS-based actuators for NASA's space applications, he received the prestigious Lew Allen Award for excellence at JPL in 2003. His scholarly leadership has been recognized by peers. Examples of these efforts include appointment as an associate editor and/or editorial board member of several journals including Nature’s Scientific Reports, and elected as the Division Chair of the ASME MEMS Division. Since joining Stevens in 2006, he has been responsible for obtaining competitive research funding from several federal agencies including NSF, AFOSR, US Army, NRO, NASA and DARPA (including 6 NSF and 3 AFOSR grants, and 5 NASA and 3 NRO contracts). Eui-Hyeok Yang holds over 12 patents (issued or pending). He is the director of the Micro Device Laboratory, a Stevens's multi-user microfabrication facility.

Abstract

I will present our investigation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-growth, achieving localized, patterned, single crystalline or polycrystalline monolayers of TMDs, including MoS2, WS2, WSe2 and MoSe2, as well as their heterostructures. We study CVD-growth and perform extensive material characterization to illuminate the role of dissimilar 2D substrates in the prevention of interior defects in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), thus uncovering the conditions for anti-oxidation. We further demonstrate the epitaxial growth of TMDs on hBN and graphene, as well as vertical/lateral heterostructures of TMDs, uniquely forming in-phase 2D heterostructures. This research provides a detailed observation of the oxidation and anti-oxidation behaviours of TMDs, which corroborate the role of underlying 2D layers in the prevention of interior defects in TMDs. If the technique could be developed to be highly reliable and high fidelity, it could have a large impact on the future research and commercialization of TMD-based devices. Furthermore, we develop flexible electrodes and energy storage toward wearable and multifunctional electronics. Here, we develop a facile fabrication technique utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), which enables high-throughput fabrication of flexible supercapacitors. We develop an innovative technique, which facilitates a stable charge/discharge under varied strains. Our structure shows a high flexibility and stability during stretching up to 20% and bending up to 180 degrees. These flexible supercapacitors are promising for various flexible electronics applications. Building on these previous results from 2D material growth and flexible electrodes, our next step is to combine 2D materials with flexible substrates toward next generation wearable detectors.

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials | Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology | Metals, Mining, Metallurgy and Materials | Advanced Materials and Devices | Characterization and Testing of Materials
    Location: Aurelia
Speaker

Chair

Mauro Giorcelli

Polytechnic University of Turin, Italy

Tuesday, June 26, 10:55-11:55

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Augusto Di Gianfrancesco photo

Session Introduction

Augusto Di Gianfrancesco

European Collaborative Creep Committee, Italy

Title

The European Creep Collaborative Committee: History, structure, activities and last assessments results

Biography

Augusto Di Gianfrancesco has graduated in chemical engineering at University of Rome “La Sapienza” in October 1982, with specialized background in materials science. He was employed at the Centro Sviluppo Materiali (CSM), Rome, Italy since February 1983 until December 2014. He holds Senior Metallurgist and Project Leader positions on “High Temperature Materials”. He was responsible for R&D activities on steels and superalloys for high temperature applications in power generation plants. He was also member of Management Committee of EU Program COST 522-536, co-founder of the European Creep Collaborative Committee and co-founder of the Italian Working Group on Creep Resistant Materials. In addition he has been member of the International Board of the 5th, 6th &7th EPRI International Conferences on Advances in Materials Technology for Fossil Power Plants, METAL2013/METAL2014 / METAL2015 / METAL2016 / METAL2017 / METAL2018, the 6th International Conference on Creep, Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Interaction, and vice chairman of the 3rd ECCC Conference held 2014 in Rome. He is author and/or co-author of more than 280 technical reports and more than 100 papers presented in national and international conferences or magazines. His current position is Materials and technologies consultant at Compusystem (www.compsyst.it), Chairman of ECCC (European Collaborative Creep Committee) and Vice-president of Center of Study Materials for Energy of Italian Society of Metallurgy (Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia).

Abstract

The European Creep Collaborative Committee (ECCC) is a voluntary group founded in 1991 to co-ordinate Europewide development of creep data for high temperature plants. The 12 countries represented in ECCC are earnestly involved in a joint effort to coordinate the generation of creep data throughout European Countries; 1) Interact with, and supply information to the technical committees at the formal European Standards organisations; 2) Mutually exchange technical expertise relating to new developments on materials for high temperatures; 3) Develop guidelines for data generation, collation/exchange, assessment and Post Assessment Tests (PAT’s). After several years of European Commission sponsoring, the ECCC is now organized as a Joint Industrial Project (JIP) that started in 2011 and is still running. This contribute will summarize ECCC’s activities over the past 26 years, its actual structure and future targets. Special emphasis will be put on the most recent achievements, that include the assessments of the CSEF grades 91, 92 and Alloy 617, completed in 2017; as well as the newly available Post Assessment Test Software – EPAT.

Tuesday, June 26, 11:55-12:20

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Mauro Giorcelli photo

Mauro Giorcelli

Polytechnic University of Turin, Italy

Title

Comparison of electrical behavior of different carbon fillers as a tool to predict final composite behavior

Biography

Mauro Giorcelli holds a master in electronic engineering and a PhD in physics and is currently enrolled as a researcher at Department of Applied science and Technologies (DISAT) at Politecnico di Torino. He has published over 50 articles in international journals and those have received over 500 citations. He is a carbon material specialist, in particular in composites materials. Recently he has started to work also in the field of low cost carbon materials, in particular, carbon materials derived from biomass (Biochar). He has a widespread collaboration network in Europe, Asia and Canada for biochar applications.

Abstract

Carbon materials are used in polymer composites to tune their properties (electrical, mechanical and thermal). Besides the traditional carbon fillers like carbon black, nanotubes and graphene biochar have been recently considered. Biochar is a carbon rich material derived from the pyrolysis of biomass. Interest on this material is due to its low cost and its great availability. Biochar perspective as a filler has been investigated by comparing its impact on composite properties to that of more expensive carbon fillers. Here we focus our attention on the electrical performance of such composites. The assessment of the electrical conductivity of the carbon filler is actually, together with its shape and aspect ratio, a good predictor of the final composite behaviour. Here we report a series of measures on the conductivity of different carbon materials in powder form. Biochar will be compared with traditional carbon filler from the electrical point of view (conductivity) and its advantage/disadvantage will be discussed in the optical of final composite performance.

Tuesday, June 26, 12:20-12:45

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Soheli Farhana photo

Soheli Farhana

International Islamic University Malaysia, Malaysia

Title

High frequency nano-transistor based ring oscillator

Biography

Soheli Farhana has completed her PhD in engineering from International Islamic University Malaysia and postdoctoral fellowship from International Islamic University Malaysia, Malaysia. She was the visiting researcher at ONE Lab, MIT. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputed journals and also serving as the committee member in several conferences.

Abstract

Carbon nanotube (CNT) transistor based ring oscillator is expected to significantly reduce the losses in signal generation circuits and increase the power density. This makes CNT devices very stimulating candidates for nextgeneration semiconductor electronics, for the applications in controllers, digital electronics, and high-frequency communications.
Presently, both graphine and carbon nanotube devices show excellent properties in the field of electrical and mechanical. Particularly, CNT based transistor devices have attracted significant attention recently, due to the potential for achieving high breakdown voltage and current levels without enlarging the chip size. Especially, chip dimension become in nano meter size. In addition, CNT devices show superior high frequency operation performance than their lateral counterparts. This research proposed CNT transistor based oscillator model which is the competitor of the conventional MOSFET technology due to their higher current drive capability, ballistic transport, lesser power delay product, higher thermal stability, and so on. Based on these promising properties of CNT transistor, a CNT transistor based ring oscillator operating around 6THz and beyond is introduced here in 14 nm technology node. The oscillator is proposed based on CNT transistor based five stack inverters. The inverters with DC gain of 32.5 dB are achieved by proper design with the non- loaded delay around 0.2ns. The oscillator’s average power consumption is as low as 0.43μW with the operational frequency of 6THz. The proposed ring oscillator design shows better performance in low energy consumption and high operating frequency by comparing with present commercial silicon based ring oscillator.

Tuesday, June 26, 12:45-13:10

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Gitae Park photo

Gitae Park

Hanyang University, South Korea

Title

Effect of prior austenitic grain size on the tensile toughness of ultra-high strength steel weldments

Biography

Gitae Park is pursuing third-year PhD in metallurgy and materials at Hanyang University, Republic of Korea. His research interests centers on the resistance spot welding of ultra-high strength steel. He has published 2 articles about welding metallurgy in a famous journal, Materials Characterization, Elsevier and the further research is being continued. He is also a member of the Korean Institue of Metals and Materials (KIM) and the Korean Welding and Joining Society (KWJS).

Abstract

This study focused on the effect of prior austenitic grain size on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-high strength steel (UHSS) weldments. For this purpose, GPa-grade UHSS has produced by POSCO, and subsequently heat affected zone (HAZ) has simulated using the Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator. To evaluate tensile toughness of the weldments, uniaxial sub-size tensile test was carried out and detailed microstructural analysis was conducted. As a result, martensitic matrix with high carbon equivalent in UHSS, which was formed due to quenching during welding, was causative of brittle fracture behaviour in coarse-grained HAZ (CGHAZ). In contrast, it has been shown that fine-grain HAZ has ductile fracture behaviour. We, therefore, suggest the inverse relationship between the prior austenitic grain size and tensile toughness. The results were explained in terms of several microstructural terms such as alloying elements segregation to boundaries, retained austenite, and microhardness.

Tuesday, June 26, 14:00-14:25

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Mauro Giorcelli photo

Mauro Giorcelli

Polytechnic University of Turin, Italy

Title

Fibre functionalization by plasma treatment

Biography

Mauro Giorcelli holds a master in electronic engineering and a PhD in physics and is currently enrolled as a researcher at Department of Applied science and Technologies (DISAT) at Politecnico di Torino. He has published over 50 articles in international journals and those have received over 500 citations. He is a carbon material specialist, in particular in composites materials. Recently he has started to work also in the field of low cost carbon materials, in particular, carbon materials derived from biomass (Biochar). He has a widespread collaboration network in Europe, Asia and Canada for biochar applications.

Abstract

Carbon fibres (CFs) are well-known for their light weight, high strength, heat resistance, anticorrosion properties, and conductivity. Owing to these inherent properties, the combination of CFs with polymers has attracted the interest of many researchers. To develop high-strength composites fibers, it is important to design interfacial chemical bonds. Simultaneously seeking cost-effective production processes and final products is important. Different surface enhancing and modification techniques on CF based materials show different behaviour. Here we report a study of plasma functionalization of CFs in the framework of the EU MODCOMP project (contract 685844), aimed to develop novel fibre-based materials for technical, high value, high performance products for nonclothing applications. In particular, we show the effect of vacuum and air plasma functionalization on CF. XPS, Raman and FESEM investigation will highlight the difference between these two types of plasma treatments. The impact of these differences on the final products will be discussed.

Tuesday, June 26, 14:25-14:50

Meetings International - Materials Science Conference 2018 Conference Session Speaker Kevin Storr photo

Kevin Storr

Prairie View A&M University, USA

Title

Condensed matter physics at the threshold of the extreme environments of temperature and magnetic fields

Biography

Kevin Storr earned a Ph.D. in low temperature condensed matter physics from the Florida State University at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee Florida. He is currently an associate professor of physics at Prairie View A&M University where he mentors undergraduate students in physics research along with directing the thesis of graduate students. He is a member of the Texas Physics Consortium and former faculty senator. He is also known as the Professor of Value. Kevin Storr conducts colloquia in areas of value, leadership, science and education. He is the director of the newly formed, “Global Value Initiative.” He is the recipient of the International Golden Rule Award, The Girma Wolde-Giorgis, Human Conservation Solutionist Award and serves as special advisor to the office of the ambassador-at-large for the Republic of Burundi.

Abstract

In the area of condensed matter, we use extreme environmental conditions of temperature (down to 20 millikelvin) and magnetic field (≤ 45 Tesla) to elucidate and tune the electronic, magnetic and thermal properties of candidate materials using several techniques. Three of our most commonly employed techniques are: electrical transport, magnetic torque cantilever and specific heat. Here we present results from three classes of materials, each studied using similar methods: organic conductors, heavy fermion systems and hybridized graphene. λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 is a quasi, two dimensional, layered, anisotropic organic conductor which has shown three states below liquid helium temperature: an antiferromagneticinsulator state, metallic state, and a field induced superconducting (FISC) ground states with observed reentrance. Nd1−xCexCoIn5 is 115 heavy fermion single crystal which exhibits unconventional superconductivity due to being an intermetallic compounds with large electron effective masses. This material can progress from having local moment magnetism to a heavy fermion with the gradual substitution of Nd with Ce. This leads to an adjustment of the availability of 4f electron coupling. Hybridized graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BNC) domains as a disordered 2D electronic system was studied using magnetoelectric transport measurements. It clearly showed show an insulating to a metallic anomalous transition during the cooling process which we modulated with electron and hole-doping. It was concluded that in comparison to other 2D systems, that in h-BNC the transition came about from percolation associated with the metallic graphene and hopping conduction along edge states.