Agenda

Schedule

Full-day Events with Awesome Speakers

Thursday, October 25

10:00-10:35
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Robert W Thatcher photo

Robert W Thatcher

Applied Neuroscience Research Institute
USA

Title

New advances in electrical neuroimaging to evaluate EEG sources and brain networks

Biography

Robert W. Thatcher, Ph.D., is currently the Director of Applied Neuroscience Research Institute and Applied Neuroscience, Inc. St. Petersburg, Florida. Dr. Thatcher is certified as an expert in both conventional electroencephalography and quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG), has read over 20,000 EEGs, and has written or supervised the writing of over 10,000 clinical EEG cases. He has extensive mathematical and programming experience as well as organizational leadership skills. He is the author of over 200 publications, including eight books. His most recent book is entitled the "Handbook of Quantitative Electroencephalography and EEG Biofeedback".

Abstract

The 3-dimensional evaluation of the sources of nonictal discharges and focal gross pathologies has recently been enhanced using advanced technology called swLORETA (weighted sLORETA. swLORETA uses Single-Value-Decomposition (SVD) to weight the lead field in order to increase lead field homogeneity and hence improved localization of deep sources. This allows for estimates of EEG sources in different layers of the cortex. Also, swLORETA uses a real MRI and not an average MRI with 12,270 voxels and a Boundary-Element-Method (BEM) of source localization (Wroel and Aliahadi, 2002). Non-ictal events and gross pathologies are localized inside of 3 dimensional volumes with the aid of slice and volume cutting tools to allow one to navigate through the brain and identify dysregulated brain network hubs (Brodmann areas) and connections. Computations include Functional Connectivity (Coherence, Lagged Coherence and Phase Difference) and Effective Connectivity (Phase Slope Index) of the magnitude and direction of information flow between network hubs as well as integration with Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). A useful method is to also view the EEG potentials on a transparent scalp while simultaneously viewing the deeper sources of the EEG from inside the brain. Both raw scores and Z scores are used as well as the Laplacian transform of the scalp EEG. Examples of source localization in patients with traumatic brain injuries, strokes and epilepsy will be presented.

10:35-11:10
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Denis Gris photo

Denis Gris

University of Sherbrooke
Canada

Title

Signature of neuroinflammation from pathophysiology to machine learning

Biography

Denis Gris completed his PhD in Neurosciences in 2007 at the Western University in London, Ontario, Canada. He then moved to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he studied the biology of pattern recognition receptors. In 2011, he established his laboratory at the University of Sherbrooke. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving on several editorial boards. His primary interests are Neuroimmunology and machine learning.

Abstract

Neuroinflammatory changes constitute substrate and precede appearances of behavioural changes. By the time such changes are detected pathophysiological processes within the CNS often irreversible. Therefore, early detection of neuroinflammation will allow faster and more successful treatments. It is especially relevant for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in whom diseases return periodically.  We have used a novel model of spontaneous MS-like disease in mice to study early mechanisms of the disease and to find the behavioural signature of approaching autoimmune attack. Using comprehensive automated video analysis followed by machine learning algorithms we have dissociated general sickness behaviour from behavioural changes associated with activation of innate immune response in the CNS. Also, we found one of the mechanisms responsible for the initiation of multiple sclerosis.

11:25-12:00
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Oara Neumann photo

Oara Neumann

Rice University, USA

Title

Fluorescent and T1 MRI active multilayer nanoparticle for imaging and targeting cellular delivery

Biography

Oara Neumann is the J. Evans Atwell-Welch Research Scientist at Rice University (a fully funded, endowed research scientist position at the university). She has completed her PhD and Postdoctoral study in Applied Physics at Rice University, an MSc in Chemical Physics from Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel and a MSc in Analytical Chemistry from Bucharest University, Romania. She is the pioneer of nanoparticle-based solar thermal applications. She holds 12 patents and she has published more than 24 refereed articles and has an h-index of 16

Abstract

Multifunctional plasmonic nanostructures have enormous potential in the treatment of solid tumors; however, tracking particles with drug cargo and triggering the release of the cargo in mapped tumors is still impossible. To overcome this challenge we have developed an MRI and fluorescent active nanostructure nanomatryoshka. This new nanostructure with IR plasmonic signatures is composed of a 50 nm Au core surrounded by dye molecules and Gd(III)-DOTA chelate doped SiO2 inner-shell and an outer Au shell. The experimental results demonstrates an enhanced T1 relaxation (r1 ~ 24 mM-1 s-1 at 4.7 T) compared to the clinical Gd(III)-DOTA chelating agents (r1 ~ 4 mM-1 s-1). Further, this design preserves the fluorescence signal (65%) after 24 hours of exposure, leading to enahanced fluorescence photostability (23x). This dual-imaging functionality nanosystem increases MRI sensitivity by concentrating Gd(III) ions into the Gd-NMs, reduces the potential toxicity of Gd(III) ions and dye molecules by preventing their release in vivo through the outer Au shell protection, and the terminal gold layer surface can then be functionalized to increase cellular uptake, circulation time, or thermal drug-release properties.

12:00-12:35
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Zafar Iqbal photo

Zafar Iqbal

Glatt Air Techniques
USA

Title

Fluid bed pelletization systems: CPS and Wurster technologies

Biography

Zafar Iqbal has over 28 years of Formulation and Process development experience with strong business and technical skills. He has a successful track record of formulation and process development of difficult-to-craft modified release dosage forms and novel drug delivery systems. Prior to Glatt, he led various formulation and process teams at Barr Laboratories and Teva Pharmaceuticals and demonstrated his leadership and management skills.

 

Abstract

Granulation using fluid bed rotor processing has proven economical and manufacturing advantages to produce a high quality product targeting the desirable product profile for various dosage forms. Producing pellets using Glatt’s patented CPSTM technology has been a cornerstone of drug development for multiparticulate systems. Well defined granules developed from active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) and other powders mixture to form multiparticulate systems such as pellets are an ideal platform for modified release dosage forms which can be administered as tablets, capsules or powders to patients. Spherical form of pellets is known to improve the powder flow, uniform particle size distribution and reduce contact surface area between particles as potential advantages. Applications for multiparticulate systems have been increasingly favored over single-unit dosage forms as a result of benefits such as controlled modified release of drugs via different dosage forms to target patient demographics. Coating process using fluid bed systems have been widely accepted process in applying uniform polymer coating onto multiparticulate systems. An overview of Wurster fluid bed equipment to understand formulation and process considerations in developing finished pharmaceutical dosage forms will be discussed.

  • Neuroscience & Therapeutics | Neuroimaging & Neuroinformatics | Behavioural Neuroscience & Neurophysiology| Cellular Neurology & Neuroplasticity
    Location: Prince Albert
Speaker

Chair

Denis Gris

University of Sherbrooke, Canada

Speaker

Co-Chair

Panchanan Maiti

Central Michigan University, USA

Session Introduction: Thursday, October 25

15:00-15:20
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Binu Shrestha photo

Binu Shrestha

Trinity School of Medicine, St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Title

Effect of an intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) on electroencephalogram (EEG) of females with premenstrual dysphoric disorders (PMDD)

Biography

Binu Shrestha is an Assistant Professor at Trinity School of Medicine as Instructor in the Department of Neuroscience. Prior to coming to Trinity, she was working in as Assistant Professor at Nepalese Army Institute of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal. She received her Medical degree (MBBS) from College of Medical Sciences, Bharatpur, Nepal. She completed her three years Residency in Basic and Clinical Physiology from BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. She also had received Advanced Neuroscience Training at Monash University under IBRO. Binu’s teaching includes teaching medical students Neuroscience and Cell molecular Biology.  After graduating as medical doctor she got interest on academic and research activity more than clinical practice. She is currently working on the research project “Prevalence of Diabetic Neuropathy among the populations of St. Vincent and the Grenadines”, “Effect of Personality on Personal Burnout in Trinity School of Medicine Students”. She is also doing course on Essential Skills Medical Education. Her research interests are in the field of Neuroscience, Electrophysiology, Medical education.

Abstract

Many women with regular menstrual cycles report unpleasant physical and/or psychological symptoms just before the menstrual cycle begins. For many women, these symptoms are mild and tolerable. However, for some women, these symptoms can be disabling and may cause significant disruption in their lives and are often reasons for seeking a medical treatment. These symptoms together are called as premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and with the modern concept, the severe form of PMS is named as premenstrual dysphoric disorders (PMDD). The study was conducted on thirty females with PMDD, selected on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria, and research criteria, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV). All the participants were explained about the procedure and written consent was taken. Anthropometric and cardio respiratory variables were recorded followed by EEG recordings with 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 Hz frequencies of intermittent photic stimulation. The first recordings were taken before menses started or during peak of symptoms reported and were repeated immediately after menses were over. EEG recordings were dissected out into its constituent frequency bands by Fast Fourier Transformation. The data of EEG power spectra were non-normally distributed, hence subjected to log transformation and statistical analysis was done. The EEG power spectra were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Paired sample t test was used to compare the anthropometric, cardio-respiratory variables, and the premenstrual EEG power spectra with post menstrual EEG power spectra. The premenstrual EEG power spectra or the EEG power spectra during the peak of symptoms as compared to the postmenstrual EEG power spectra showed a significant (p<0.05) increase in Beta activity over frontotemporoparietal (F3,C3,T3 and P3) area of left hemisphere which concludes that the increased in beta activity at most of the sites of  left hemisphere under intermittent photic stimulus before menses or during the peak of symptoms of PMDD is indicative of presence of anxiety,stress, insomnia, and obsessive or negative thought.
 

15:20-15:40
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Christina Vadiyala photo

Christina Vadiyala

Texila American University, Guyana

Title

The visual cortex and fusiform facial recognition connections revealed: noninvasive mapping with diffusion tensor imaging tractography on prosopagnosia in Alzheimer’spatients

Biography

Christina Vadiyala is a medical student in an Eminent University in the Caribbean region Guyana, the Texila American University. She is an outstanding Junior Young Researcher in “Team NeurON” group from the same University.  Her   research area   of   interest   is   Neuroscience   and   Imaging tractography.  She is leading a research sub-group within the Team NeurON.  She  also  involved  in  more  than  15  research  activities  in Team  NeurON,  and  also  she  has  been  serving  as  Secretary  and Coordinator  for  the  same  Team  NeurON  group  in  Texila  America University.

Abstract

Prosopagnosia is a common sign in Alzheimer disease (AD), especially characterized by the loss of familiar face recognition in the earlier stage.   Brain regions dedicated to human face processing include Amygdala,   Fusiform   Face   Area   (FFA), Occipital Face Area (OFA), a region of ventro-medial temporal cortex and superior temporal sulcus.  Early visual analysis of facial features occurs in the visual cortex and Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS).  Invariant aspects like similar Face recognition is processed in the lateralusiform gyrus, which is interconnected with temporal lobe, where specific information about name and biographical data are  retrieved.  The  Diffusion  tensor  images (DTI) datasets  were obtained  from 25 control and 25 Alzheimer patients  of  both  the  sexes,  with  age  group  from 50  to  75  years. Study aimed to identify the neural structural connectivity analysis in failure of familiar face recognition in Alzheimer’s Patients. Also, correlates its functional importance, using “Non-Invasive Diffusion Imaging fiber Tractography”.

Results: Analysis of tracts from visual cortex to inferior temporal lobe showed decrease in number and increase in the length of the tracts  in  Alzheimer’s  patients  when  compared  to  normal  (DTI). Tracts reaching fusiform are greatly varied.  Variation  in  the number  and  volume  of  connectivity  fibers  between  the  visual cortex   with   fusiform   gyrus   are   primarily   identified   in   right hemisphere than left hemisphere.

Conclusion:   As   the   tracts   reaching   the   fusiform   gyrus   are deteriorated, it interprets in the atrophy of fusiform gyrus which leads to the absence of Familiar Face Recognition in AD patients.

15:40-16:00
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Bibi Maleki photo

Bibi Maleki

Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title

Promoting psychosocial wellbeing following stroke: The Roy’s adaptation model approach

Biography

Bibi Maleki has completed her Master Science in Nursing at the age of 35 years nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. She is the instructor and research employee of Research center of Nursing and Midwifery Care, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University. She has published some papers in Iranian reputed journals.

Abstract

Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is a chronic disease which influences different aspects of human’s life such as the psychological and social dimensions. The patients’ recovery of balance in these dimensions needs proper and pre-planned care. Therefore, the objective of present study is to examine the effects of a care plan upon the extent of patients’ compatibility with psychosocial dimensions in reference to Roy’s adaptation model and from biological aspect. The present study is based on a clinical trial of 50 CVA patients in selected hospitals of Isfahan during 2014-2015. The studied units are selected through accessibility sampling and randomly assigned to two groups of similar size. The necessary data is collected through researchers’ developed form of recognition and review of Roy’s model. The care plan is developed based on the incompatible behaviors and their stimuli which is implemented for the test group and follow-up study was also done. The control group receives routine cares. The collected data is analyzed through SPSS Software (version.18) and the statistical tests are analyzed. The mean score of compatibility before intervention in the two groups shows no significant difference in regard to psychological adjustment (i.e. self-perception, independence-dependence) and social dimension (role-playing) but a significant difference is found after intervention in the two groups (P<0.001). The application of designed care plan based on Roy’s adaptation model with holistic approach and the cares based on cooperation among the units leads to enhancement of psychosocial dimensions among CVA patients.

16:20-16:40
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Anjana Chowdary Elapolu photo

Anjana Chowdary Elapolu

Texila American University, Guyana

Title

An attempt on simplifi cation of strange human visual perception of physical world

Biography

Anjana Chowdary Elapolu is a medical student in an Eminent University in the Caribbean region – Guyana, the Texila American University. She is an outstanding Junior Young Researcher in “Team NeurON” group from the same University. She is basically from India, migrated to Guyana for her Medicine study and Research activities. Her area of interest is Cognitive neuroscience and Imaging tractography. She is working over the cognitive aspect of Neuroscience, and also involved in research sub-group of Team NeurON. She also is serving as Young Research Coordinator (YRC) for the same Team NeurON group in Texila America University.

Abstract

Human has highly intellectual quality of perceiving the physical world through an immense sense of eyes called “Vision” and it is really mysterious in terms of “visual perception”. Visual perception refers to the interpretation of what we take in through our eyes. The information congregated by our eyes is processed by our brain, creating a perception that in reality, sometimes it does not match to the true image.  In other words, brain acts on a strange way that the subjective perception of physical reality of objective state, while no form of illusion has actually been created by the object. The following are some of the strange aspects human visual perceptions are considered to attempt for some simplifications, which are luminance, colour, area, length, orientation, lines, angles, distance, depth, and motion. Though the perception of some of these aspects has been thoroughly studied, our knowledge of the rest is still shallow. Our perception is an amalgamation of various parameters of judgment. This study focuses on various such parameters that lead to the difference that occurs between objective appearance and subjective perceptions, these include – psychological, physiological, interpretational, empirical and neurological aspects. This study will assess which of these factors interact in order to deliver outputs different from reality under different conditions, and why our judgment is challenged by moderate variations in the background of our field of view, just how much do we depend on comparative analysis, and how reliable our judgment is in a situation where our comparative ability is challenged.

16:40-17:00
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Mahboobeh Parsapoor photo

Mahboobeh Parsapoor

McGill University,Canada

Title

Understanding the nature of consciousness and qualia using artifi cial intelligence

Biography

Mahboobeh Parsapoor has a licentiate degree of information technology from Halmstad University where she has been a member of Center for Research on Embedded Systems and she focused on developing a new type of data-driven models that is referred to as brain emotional learning inspired models. She is interested in conducting research on various topics include: computational intelligence, nonlinear system identification and classification, wireless communication and has published several articles in these subjects. She is in the reviewer panel of IEEE communication letter and Neural Networks Journal.

Abstract

One of the big challenges in the field of cognitive neuroscience understands consciousness and its building blocks.  The fact is that understanding consciousness can help cognitive neuroscientists understand the underlying procedure of the human brain to form a personal view of the world. It also can assist neuroscientists to figure out how the human brain process information, extract valuable message, form memory and expand knowledge. To do so, cognitive neuro-scientist have defined the terminology qualia and introduced it as a building block of consciousness.  It has been stated that information messages which is extracted from basic sensory input as light, voice, etc. and represent it as information messages the basis of qualia is the basis of qualia. Qualia have been defined by philosophers and neuroscientists to explain introspectively accessible phenomenal aspects of our mental lives.  However, the existence of qualia has been the sourse of conflicts between cognitive neuroscientists. The existence of their bearers”; 3) “How qualia relate to the physical world both inside and out- side the head”. In contrast, some scientists have agreed on existence of qualia and offered the following statements, 1) Does the perceptual knowledge of human have a material character of its own?; 2) Does it have some physical impacts, in particular on the brain ; 3) If it is what is the order of such impact?  4) Finally, how the brain can regulate those impacts.  In our research, we have decided to take advantage of artificial intelligence (AI) in particular machine learning and deep learning to prove the existence of qualia.  To do so, we have set up some experimental studies and recorded the electroencephalogram (EEG) of participants in the studies, and then we apply MLs to classify the data sets. of qualia has been denied on the basis of the following question: 1)”Which mental states have qualia”; 2) “Whether qualia are intrinsic qualities.

Friday, October 26

10:00-10:35
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Ramandeep Kaur photo

Ramandeep Kaur

Reg Web Consulting Services Inc.,
Canada

Title

Symbiosis of regulatory affairs and drug development to deliver high quality, safe and effective medicines

Biography

Ramandeep Kaur is a post graduate in pharmacy and has more than 14 years of experience in Regulatory Affairs in pharmaceutical and biotechnological industry. She is well experienced in regulatory aspects of all phases of drug development, approval and life cycle maintenance. She has dealt with different types of submissions for a vast range of products for global markets. Currently, she is working as a Director in RegWeb Consulting Services Inc., Canada.

Abstract

Regulatory Affairs plays a crucial role in the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industry and is involved in all stages of drug development, drug approval and life cycle maintenance of the product after approval. The Drug Discovery and Development cell in the industry is obligated to follow the strict regulations and guidelines issued by health authorities to develop the safe and effective medicines. Regulatory Affairs acts as an interface between the industry and the health authorities and provides strategic advice to ensure regulatory compliance at all stages. The drug development process is changed drastically from the last 2 decades due to new technological advancement in the science. With this advancement, the role of Regulatory Affairs is also broadened and strengthened. The Drug Discovery/Development and Regulatory Affairs have joined hands in the modern process of drug development for interpretation and application of regulations with a goal to provide high quality, safe and effective medicines to the patients.

10:35-11:10
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Shereen Aly photo

Shereen Aly

Pharma Consulting Group
Canada

Title

Impact analysis of mandatory reporting of serious adverse drug reactions and medical device incidents on healthcare institutions following the 2014 amendment to the food and drug regulations (Vanessa's Law) in Canada

Biography

Shereen Aly is a Physician & Pharmacovigilance expert. She received her Master and PhD degree in Critical Care Medicine in 2007 and also a holder of a master degree in pharmacovigilance and epidemiology from 7 affiliated European Universities under the EU2p Program. She is a true pioneer in her field and an author of many scientific publications. Her role focuses on being a medical advisor to healthcare providers, industry and regulatory agencies. Her priority is Post- Market drug surveillance relating to the collection, detection, assessment, monitoring and prevention of adverse effects with pharmaceutical products.

Abstract

The study measures the national readiness of acute healthcare institutions for the adoption and implementation of the serious adverse event and medical device incident mandatory reporting process to meet the new Canadian drug law; Protecting Canadian from Unsafe Drug Act “Vanessa’s Law” set by Health Canada. An online survey questionnaire was designed to gain institutional insights on policy awareness, preparedness, systems and processes, resourcing and training measures taken for adverse event reporting and the potential challenges and benefits that would be faced when the law becomes implemented in December 2019. Analysis of the results indicated that 96.4 % of the respondents were unaware of Vanessa’s Law and its reporting requirements, 50% of respondents confirmed the preparedness of their respective institutions to implement the new ADR reporting requirement. In regards their information management sytems, 75% of respondents indicated they have a well-established reporting system in place to support the new regulation. Currently, ADR reporting within the healthcare institutions is an encouraged voluntary process. It has been identified that awareness of the new law is very low with no clear supporting guidance in place yet. Hospitals need a formal guidance from Health Canada upon which to base their operational procedures and in order to ensure that institutions can develop appropriate training and standard operational procedures for the reporting of mandatory ADR and medical device incidents. Health Canada needs to consider immediately implementing educational strategies to address this issue as well as a clear and descriptive supporting guidance before the law goes into full force.

 

11:25-12:00
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Ganesh Elumalai photo

Ganesh Elumalai

Texila American University, Guyana

Title

3D constructive connectivity analysis in Alzheimer patients: Detecting structural alterations and their underlying substrates for optic ataxia in correlations with

Biography

Ganesh Elumalai is an Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Neuroscience at the Texila American University, College of Medicine. He has received a distinguished Neuroscience, Medical Embryology and Histology Teacher award. His designation, decorates various positions in TAU-COM as Academic, Research, Chair in Program Evaluation Committee, Chair and Principle Investigator Team NeurON and Publishing activities that relate to teaching and research support.

Abstract

Optic ataxia is a high order neurological deficit, mostly seen in Alzheimer’s patient which affects the posterior parietal cortex. These patients exhibit deficit for spontaneous eye hand coordination. Visual information is processed in two distinct routes dorsal and ventral streams, for (visual spatial recognition and perception). The interactions between dorsal and ventral streams are important for controlling, object-oriented hand movements. Previous studies unravel the substantial evidences, we Team NeurON focused to correlate its structural connectivity with Optic Ataxia in Alzheimer’s Patients correlating its functional importance, using “Diffusion Imaging fiber Tractography”.  The study involves both the sex (DTI) datasets from 25 control and 25 Alzheimer patients, age group from 50 to 75 years.

Results: The fibers were traced, and identified for “Dorsal-how” stream pathways involved in visual objects spatial orientation. The neural structural connections, seen in “Dorsal” stream pathways, extending between the “Visual cortex (BA 18 & 19) with Superior Parietal Lobule (BA 7)”, shows visuo-motor coordination pathway or “how” stream pathways in visual perception. Observations on control groups (numbers and volumes) of fibres are higher at proportion in female than in male (Fig-1). In contrast it was observed that females displayed a much severe changes in (numbers and volumes) when compared with male’s patients (Fig-2).
Conclusion: The current observations, propose insight knowledge to understand Damage to “how” stream fibers in the Visual pathways, manifest as Optic ataxia in Alzheimer’s Patients. But, the findings need to be confirmed with functional MRIs analysis in future understandings.

12:00-12:35
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Panchanan Maiti photo

Panchanan Maiti

Central Michigan University
USA

Title

Comparative study of effects of natural Curcumin and solid lipid curcumin particles on cell death and autophagy mechanism in cultured glioblastoma cells

Biography

Panchanan Maiti has completed his PhD from Defence Research and Development Organization, Ministry of Defence, Govt of India under Bharathiar University and Postdoctoral Studies from Dept. of Neurology and Dept. of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, USA. Currently, he is the chief research scientist of Field Neurosciences Institute, St. Mary’s of Michigan, and also hold adjunct faculty positions at Psychology, Neuroscience program, Central Michigan University, Dept. of Biology, Saginaw Valley State University and Laboratory instructor, brain research laboratory at Saginaw Valley State University, MI, USA. He has published more than 43 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of several reputed journals.

Abstract

Despite significant advancements in cancer therapies over the years, glioblastoma (GBM) remains largely incurable. Curcumin (Cur), a natural polyphenol, has potent anti-cancer effects against several malignancies, including metastatic brain tumors. However, its limited bio-availability reduces its efficiency for treating GBM. Recently, we have shown that solid lipid curcumin particles (SLCPs) have greater bio-availability and brain tissue penetration. The present study compares the efficiency of cell death by Cur and or SLCPs in cultured GBM cells derived from human (U-87MG) and mouse (GL261) or rat (F98) tissue. Several cell viability and cell death assays and markers proteins (MTT assay, annexin-V staining, TUNEL staining, comet assay, DNA gel electrophoresis, Western blot) and autophagy markers were investigated following treatment of Cur and or SLCP (25 μM) for 24-72 h. Relative to Cur, the use of SLCP increased more cell death, DNA fragmentation, produced longer DNA tails. Whereas, macroautophagy markers, such as Atg5, Atg7, Beclin-1, LC3A/B, mTOR, p-mTOR, as well as mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) markers, such as BNIP3/NIX, FUNDC1 and HIF-1α were inhibited by Cur and or SLCP. Furthermore, we found a greater inhibition of these markers in the case of SLCP-treated cells in comparison to Cur-treated cells. We did not find such inhibition in the case of control glial (C6-glioma) and neuronal cell line (N2a). Overall, our result suggests that SLCP can be used to inhibit GBM growth and proliferation more than natural Cur via inhibiting autophagy mechanism.

  • Neuroscience & Therapeutics: Recent Advance Treatment |Neuroimaging & Neuroinformati cs | Behavioural Neuroscience & Neurophysiology| Neurological disorder
    Location: Prince Albert
Speaker

Chair

Denis Gris

University of Sherbrooke, Canada

Speaker

Co-Chair

Panchanan Maiti

Central Michigan University, USA

Session Introduction: Friday, October 26

14:00-14:20
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Geethanjali Vinodh Anand photo

Geethanjali Vinodh Anand

Texila American University, Guyana

Title

Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography: Neural Structural Connectivity analysis for Olfactory Attention Defi cit in Alzheimer’s Patients

Biography

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, and like most neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, olfactory dysfunction is a clinical marker appearing years before the decline in motor and cognitive functions. According to the results of a study comparing the odor-visual association between a controlled group and AD-affected group, a conclusion was drawn regarding degeneration in the central olfactory nervous system, but the specific structure affected remained unknown. The present study includes Diffusion tensor images (DTI) datasets of 25 control and 25 Alzheimer patients from both the sexes, with age group from 50 to 75 years. This study is aimed towards identifying the structural connectivity for Olfactory Attention Deficit in Alzheimer’s Patients by identifying the structural connectivity extension between the Olfactory Cortex (OC) and Frontal Eye Field (FEF), using DTI fiber tractography for Olfactory – Saccadic pathways.

Results: A rigid pattern was not noted, but among control groups, a number of fibers in Olfactory–Saccadic pathways for female subjects was much higher in proportion (in numbers and volumes) than male. In Alzheimer patients, it was observed that females displayed a much drastic deterioration in (numbers and volumes) Olfactory –Saccadic pathways compared with male patients.

Conclusion: Olfactory dysfunction is the earliest clinical symptom, and an inexpensive and practical diagnostic method is urgently needed for early diagnosis. This study provides a significant finding in the identification of structural degeneration, for Olfactory Attention Deficit in Alzheimer patients. But, the confirmation of finding with functional MRIs analysis is crucial.

Abstract

Geethanjali Vinodh Anand, she is a medical student in an Eminent University in the Caribbean region – Guyana, the Texila American University. She is an outstanding Junior Young Researcher in “Team NeurON” group from the same University. She is basically from India, migrated to Guyana for her Medicine study and Research activities. Her area of interest is Neuroscience and Imaging tractography. She is leading a research sub-group with in the Team NeurON. She also involved in more than 15 research actives in Team NeurON, and also, she has been serving as Secretary and coordinator for the same Team NeurON group in Texila America University.

14:20-14:40
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Bhawana Neupane Pant photo

Bhawana Neupane Pant

Nepalgunj Medical College, Nepal

Title

Autonomic function test in obese among mid-western population of Nepal

Biography

Purpose: Obesity is associated with metabolic risk factors such as high blood pressure, blood fat abnormality, and glucose intolerance which may influence the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases. Besides being a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, certain cancers and type II diabetes, obesity has also been associated with change in autonomic function in human. Although a lot of progress has been achieved in past decade on accessibility and awareness about health, the obesity remains impending and burgeoning health concern in Nepal. With this trend, we can foresee that the Body Mass Index (BMI) one of the commonly used indirect measure of obesity might potentially turn out to be one of the leading factor of autonomic dysfunction.

Methods: 100 healthy subjects were screened and divided into 2 groups- Group I (BMI>30) and Group II (BMI< 30). Height was measured by stadiometer with subjects having their shoes removed. Weight was measured with weighing machine in light clothes. BMI was calculated using the formula: BMI= weight(kg)/height(m2)

Resting heart rate (RHR) was recorded with Lead II of ECG. Blood pressure (BP) and Heart Rate (HR) were recorded in supine position and on immediate standing. Cold pressure test: Resting BP was recorded in sitting position. Then the subjects were asked to immerse the hand in cold water, and the BP was measured from other hand. Data was analyzed using SPSS 16 (Statistical Package for Social Science).

Result: Our result showed that RHR of Group I (79.32 ± 4.22) was higher than that of Group II (74.38 ± 7.26). However, BP and HR response to immediate standing (P =0.34 &P=0.23 respectively) were non-significant between obese and non-obese person. When the correlation was done for the change in BP in  response to cold pressor test in between obese and non-obese person it was found to be significant (P = 0.04).

Conclusion: Our data suggests that the BMI can be a predictor of autonomic dysfunction.

 

Abstract

Bhawana Pant Neupane has completed her BDS ( Bachelor of Dental Surgery) from Dhaka University, Bangaladesh & M.D at the age of 33 years from Kathmandu University, Kathmandu, Nepal. She is a lecturer in department of Medical Physiology in Nepalgunj Medical College. She is actively involved in teaching to medical students of this college. She has published 1 paper as a co-author till now named: Goit RK, Jha SK, Pant BN. Alteration of cardiac autonomic function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

14:40-15:00
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Shahnaz Soleimani photo

Shahnaz Soleimani

Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title

Autism Spectrum Disorders in Iranian Children: A Behavioral Challenge Approach

Biography

Shahnaz Soleimani has completed his BS degree at the age of 25 years from Payame Noor University, Iran in 2012. Also she has graduated from Azad University in Master of Science in the Clinical Psychology. She is the Director of behavioral department of the Nobel, Office of Social and Child Advisory Services.

Abstract

Autism is a complex neurobehavioral condition that involves loss of harmony with repetitive behaviors in social interaction and developing language and communication skills. Due to the limitations of symptoms, this condition is now called Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The World Health Organization noted in 2013 that reviews estimate one child in 160 has an autism spectrum disorder. Most research into Autism Spectrum Disorders has been conducted in affluent English-speaking countries which have extensive professional support services. Also, a series of investigations was undertaken in Iran. Iran does not have any official estimation of its autism population. Mohammed Taki Jaghtei, a consultant to the Health Ministry, has said that by September 23, an autism screening program will be conducted in the partner initiative between the Kalyan organization and the Special Education Organization. Nevertheless, the state welfare organization says that the number of diagnoses is increasing. According to findings of searched PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and 4 Iranian databases (IranPsych, IranMedex, Irandoc and Scientific Information Database (SID) to find Iranian studies on ASDs., 39 investigations, comprising original, review and editorial articles; proceedings; and available dissertations were categorized by prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment Awareness about autism is growing in Iran through TV shows and educational campaigns. But families still struggle without any outside help and worry about the future when they are gone. According the research findings, the most commonly reported needs of Iranian parents who have children with autism are related to services, professionals, and information about their child unusually behaviors. Parents also express that they need help to deal with their fear about childs future. Some researcher believe that in Iran, the main issues are lack of resources and support for families.
 

15:00-15.20
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Mojtaba Ansari Jafari photo

Mojtaba Ansari Jafari

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title

Techniques for imaging in the clinical neuroscience & therapeutics

Biography

Mojtaba Ansari Jafari has completed his MD at the age of 30 years from Tehran University and Medical Imaging specialist degree Studies from Tehran university of Medical Sciences, Iran. He is faculty member and the Director of Medical Imaging department in an educational hospital. He has published some papers in valuable national and international journals and had been serving as a board member of scientific imaging.
 

Abstract

In the last 30 years, a number of non-invasive spatial mapping techniques have been demonstrated to provide powerful insights into the operation of the brain during task performance. With the recent technological improvements in imaging devices, but also networking and computing, the data handled by researchers has remarkably evolved. For example, sophisticated imaging techniques are required to characterize the complex dynamic neuro-anatomical changes that occur over time in health and disease. These are, in order of their emergence as robust technologies: positron emission tomography, source localization with EEG and MEG, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. The imaging neuroscience study areas represented in this volume use the first or last of these PET and fMRI. Imaging in clinical neuroscience has an impact in a variety of areas of medicine, therefore, computational skills, including multimodal analyses, signal processing and parametric statistical modelling, are key to successful analyses. In order to apply clinical neuroscience imaging, we have to know the physical principles underlying techniques and also, the important assumptions and limitations.In this article, we will discuss the range of applications for each is briefly indicated.

15:20-15:40
Meetings International - Neuroscience 2018 Conference Session Speaker Venkata Hari Krishna Yadav Kurra photo

Venkata Hari Krishna Yadav Kurra

Texila American University, Guyana

Title

Logopenic aphasia tau pathology: An observation on phonological loop fi bre-specifi c white matter reductions in Alzheimer’s disease - Is it a causal or casual link?

Biography

Venkata Hari Krishna Yadav kurra is a medical student at the Texila American University in the Caribbean region Guyana. He is an outstanding Junior Young Researcher in Team NeurON group from the same University. He is basically from India, migrated to Guyana for his Medicine study and Research activities. His area of interest is Neuroscience and Imaging tractography. He is also involved in more than 15 research actives in Team NeurON group in Texila America University.
 

Abstract

Primary progressive fascia is a neurodegenerative disorder that was recently classified into three types: fluent (meaningful), non-fluent, and logophenic. Logopenic aphasia, is characterized with difficulty in retrieving correct words, names, or numbers and sentence repetition. In previous studies, it has been said that 50% of the LogicGenic versions are closely related to Alzheimer's disease compared to two other types, which are closely related to frontotemporal dementia. Previous workers identified that the atrophy of Inferior parietal lobe, cause logopenic aphasia. But, the exact structural connectivity correlations are still unproven. We Team NeurON focused to identify the structural connectivity correlations, using “Diffusion Imaging fiber Tractography” and identified the detoriation of fibers in phonological loop, possibly cause aphasia in Alzheimer’s Patients”.  The study involves both the sex DTI datasets from 25 control and 25 Alzheimer patients, age group from 50 to 75 years.

Results:  Alteration in numbers and volume of the tracts in the phonological loop of both the hemispheres, insignificantly vary between the control and Alzheimer’s groups. But, we observe that the fibers connecting the bilateral phonological loops are markedly reduced in Alzheimer's disease.

Conclusion: The current observations, propose an insight knowledge to understand the probable cause of aphasia in Alzheimer’s patients. The phonological loops are nearly normal in both the cases but, variation in the communicating fibers from right to left connections are severely detoriated, which may lead to the cause of aphasia, but, the findings need to be confirmed with functional MRIs analysis in future understandings.