World Congress and Expo on

Recycling

Berlin, Germany   August 29-30, 2018

Scientific Program

Keynote Session:

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Davis L Ford photo

Davis L Ford

The University of Texas

Title: The role of science in developing enhanced oil & gas resources, being environmentally sound & protecting water use

Biography:

Davis Ford is a practicing environmental engineer with over fifty years of experience in the field.  In addition he serves on the faculty at The University of Texas at Austin as an Adjunct Professor and a Visiting Professor of Petroleum Engineering at Texas Tech University. He has published hundreds of technical papers, has co-authored or contributed to ten textbooks, written several biographies, and also co-authored a children’s book. Dr. Ford lectures extensively throughout the United States, Europe, South America, and Asia. Dr. Ford received his bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University and his master's and doctorate degrees in Environmental Engineering from The University of Texas at Austin.  He is a Distinguished Engineering Graduate of both Texas A&M University and The University of Texas as well as a Distinguished Alumnus of Texas A&M.  Dr. Ford was elected to The National Academy of Engineers (affiliated with the National Academy of Science and the National Academy of Medicine) in 1997. In 2005, he was inducted into The Academy of Medicine , Engineering, and Science at Texas. He is an Eagle Scout. He resides in Austin, Texas, with his wife of more than fifty years, his three daughters close by, and ten grandchildren - nine boys and one girl.

Abstract:

The Major Producers of Oil and Gas Extraction Currently are the United States followed by Russia and Saudi Arabia with the Price of Brent Crude in the Range of $70 dollars per BBL (2018), Other Proven Reserves in the World Plan to Develop Production, Such as Chile and Argentina, China, Canada, Mexico and Norway (off shore). Moreover, Countries with a Sound GDP Will be Importing Oil and Gas as the Most Cost Effective Way, Namely from Cost Competition in the International Market. This Presentation Includes Areas of Proven Crude, which will be Competitively Prices Free on Board to Energy Deficit Countries, with the Free Market Pricing.

 

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Christer Forsgren photo

Christer Forsgren

Stena Recycling International AB

Title: Resource efficient use of polymers after end of life

Biography:

Christer Forsgren has completed his Master in Chemical Engineering at Chalmers Technical University and studied for PhD at Örebro University. Since year 2011,Forsgren is Adjunct Professor in Industrial Material Recycling at Chalmers.  He is the Technical and Environmental Director of Stena Recycling International, a premier recycling company in northern parts of EU. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an board member in many recycling related organizations. More than 25 years of experience from management positions.           
 

 

Abstract:

Thermoplastic material is often a mixture of a polymer and additives. Less than ten different polymers represents > 95 % of the plastics used in society. Today often the design of plastic containing products is the main reason for difficulties in the material recycling process. The consequence is an extensive down cycling to products that very seldom can replace use of virgin plastics, or even worse is sent for landfilling or incineration.. Even with improved design, perhaps from guides in the Eco design Directive, some plastic products will be very difficult to material recycle due to different forms of contaminations. For these, gasification to produce raw material to the chemical industry or a gas that could replace virgin fossil alternatives, is a good alternative.

No Separation, Identification and Sorting (SIS) processes are 100 % correct, why small amounts of contamination will always be possible to detect, especially with new analytical tools with very low detection limit values. In a more Circular Economy, “Everything can be found Everywhere”. It is now very important to educate everyone that even if something unwanted is found it does not mean that it is a problem. Bio availability is much more important than content of contaminations when requirements of recycled plastics are set.

Large scale recycling plants are needed for a more circular economy. In the image below you see the new recycling plant in Halmstad, Sweden where metals and plastics are recycled. Examples of new types of material recycling processes at this site will be presented.

 

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Remi Jaligot photo

Remi Jaligot

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology

Title: Valuing waste as resource: Mechanisms of change in developed and developing countries

Biography:

Rémi Jaligot is a PhD student at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland. He has conducted various work on waste management and the informal sector in Egypt, Jordan, Switzerland, etc. He worked for the German development agency (GIZ) and a consortium of NGOs on informal waste management near refugee camps in the Middle East.   

Abstract:

The total municipal solid waste (MSW) generated worldwide in 2012 was approximately 1.3 billion tonnes [1]. Were all countries to continue to generate waste at the current rate of high-income countries, total waste generation could reach 5.9 billion tonnes by 2025 [2]. While reuse remains best practice to turn waste into a resource, recycling is key to sustainable waste management. However, large differences exist in its objectives and in practice between developed and developing countries. In developed countries, MSW generation should be decoupled from economic growth [3]. Currently, recovery is seen as an alternative to expensive waste disposal, and as a response to more stringent environmental regulations. In developing countries, recycling is largely a private valorization, income-generating activity including the commercialization of recycled material for the actors in the value chain [4]. For example, the recycling value chain starts with source segregation after waste is produced. While raising awareness and economic incentives such as direct household payments may be useful in developing countries like Egypt to promote source segregation, legal enforcement and taxes may have positive, long-term impact on the production of MSW and source segregation in developed countries like Switzerland [4, 5]. Using case studies, we show the dichotomy between effective mechanisms used to value waste as a resource in developed and developing countries.

 

Oral Session 1:

  • Construction Waste Management | Biological Waste Management | Industrial Waste Recycling
Speaker

Chair

Davis L Ford

The University of Texas, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Christer Forsgren

Stena Recycling International AB, Sweden

Meetings International - Recycling 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Wang Wenqiang photo

Wang Wenqiang

Tsinghua University, China

Title: Recovery of valuable elements from spent hydrotreating catalyst using a carbothermic reduction method

Biography:

Wang Wenqiang received his master’s degree in Metallurgical Engineering from Central South University (Changsha, China) in 2016.  His research directions included extraction metallurgy of rare metals (W, Mo and V), separation and purification technology (separation of similar elements like Mo from W, Li from Mg). Currently, he is pursuing his PhD in Chemical Engineering and Technology under direction of Prof. Xu Shengming in Tsinghua University. His researches mainly focus on the recycling of secondary resources, including spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs), spent hydrotreating catalysts and metallurgical slags.

 

Abstract:

Recovery of spent hydrotreating catalyst is imperative considering their hazardous nature to the environment and high recovery value as an important secondary resource. As valuable metals contained in spent catalyst are in different chemical status and are highly mixed, the difficulty for their recovery lies in how to enhance leaching efficiency and separate different elements from each other efficiently. Till now, the leaching process has been studied fully while the separation of elements is complicated and reagent consumed. Herein, a novel promising method for separation valuable elements was introduced by using a carbothermic reduction process. In the new method, thermodynamic calculation method was used to predict the reaction mechanism and optimum conditions for carbothermic reduction. After carbothermimc reduction, metal oxides were transformed to compounds with obvious property differences using a carbothermic reduction method. Subsequently, the generated compounds were separated from each other through simple operations. This new route for recovery of valuable elements from spent hydrotreating catalyst not only dramatically reduce the handling cost and simplify handling procedure, but also make the recycling process much more environmentally friendly.

 

Meetings International - Recycling 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Xiaoyan Meng photo

Xiaoyan Meng

Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Title: Multi-agent based simulation and policy regulation for urban household solid waste recycling behavior

Biography:

Xiaoyan Meng has completed her PhD at the age of 30 years from Tsinghua University. She is working at Division of Sustainable Development Strategy, Institutes of Science and Development, Chinese Academy of Sciences. She has published more than 8 papers in reputed journals.

 

Abstract:

The urban household solid waste (HSW) classification and recycling system is a complex adaptive system, containing multiple agents and the behaviors between them are interactive. In order to figure out which is the most effective waste management policy for the HSW classification and recycling, this study tried to establish a simulation model combining multi-agent based simulation (MABS) techniques with a social survey questionnaire. The model can simulate the behavior change of the agents in the system under different policy scenarios. Then the proposed model is utilized in Suzhou city in eastern China. The system contains three main agents: (1) Resident agents that generate the HSW, (2) the recycling site agents that collect the recyclable materials, (3) the agents in the sanitation department that is responsible for the municipal solid waste collection and terminal garbage disposal. In addition, three waste charge policy scenarios are set and relevant simulation experiments are carried out. The results show that the specific charge policy can improve the performance of residents’ separation behavior, which is a more effective way to reduce the HSW and increase the collection rate of domestic recyclable resources. There exists certain benefit conflicts between the environmental sanitation agent and the DRR recycling agent at the present stage. At the same time, it is suggested to strengthen the planning and construction of supporting facilities for urban classification and recycling, to push forward the integration of the classification and recycling of the HSW, and to promote the new recycling mode according to local conditions

Meetings International - Recycling 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Silvia Ponce photo

Silvia Ponce

University of Lima, Peru

Title: Biocomposite based on tara gum for arsenic remotion in water from mining industry

Biography:

Silvia Ponce , researcher at the Institute of Scientific Research (IDIC) of the University of Lima and PhD in Chemical Sciences from the Autonomous University of Madrid , has been awarded the first place in the L'Oréal-UNESCO-Concytec National Award for Women in The science. She was presented with the project "Processing of agricultural waste to obtain fuels that can be used in kitchens in rural Andean areas with less domestic environmental impact", that to rise as the winner of this contest will receive a grant of 30,000 nuevos soles . Currently, Dr. Ponce leads a team involved in an initiative contemplated by the National Council of Science and Technology (Concytec ) that is being developed at the University of Lima. Using specially developed materials, this project proposes the degradation of volatile organic compounds in water, such as pesticides in Apurímac farms. Throughout her career, the doctor has participated in various projects related to the environment. Among them, there is a practical bag that, with the help of solar radiation, decontaminates water, whose research and development were encouraged by the  National University of Engineering and the University of Buenos Aires.

 

Abstract:

One of the most dangerous pollutants that could be present in water is arsenic, which accumulates in all living beings, producing arsenisism in humans. Mining is a strong industry in Peru. Extraction process produces high quantity of polluted sludge than is difficult to manage. The methods commonly used for removal of arsenic contain iron, which is capable of binding to remove arsenic from the contaminated source, produce a large quantity of sludge, that it´s difficult to manage.

Tara gum is a natural product obtained of Tara tree. Its product is useful as an additive for the food industry and its biodegradability. Sludge obtained from remotion of arsenic in water product of mining, could be removed using the magnetite nanoparticles. Tara gum that provide surface area will be degraded naturally and arsenic from magnetite nanoparticles are removed using a magnet, removing the sludge management. A biocomposite based on magnetite nanoparticles supported on Tara gum was prepared using coprecipitation method in controlled atmosphere. Remotion of arsenic studies shows that the new material can removed 40% using a solution with 2 ppm of arsenic. Magnetite nanoparticles are responsible of arsenic removal, which are more efficiency because of its small size. The new material is eco-friendly because it can be biodegradaded by exposed to the environment. Water obtained after treatment can be incorporated to water bodies or used for agricultural purposes without negative effects.

 

Meetings International - Recycling 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Xu Shengming photo

Xu Shengming

Tsinghua University, China

Title: Recovery of valuable elements from spent hydrotreating catalyst using a carbothermic reduction method

Biography:

Xu Shengming is a professor in Tsinghua University. His researches mainly focus on the recycling of secondary resources, including spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs), spent hydrotreating catalysts and metallurgical slags.

Abstract:

Recovery of spent hydrotreating catalyst is imperative considering their hazardous nature to the environment and high recovery value as an important secondary resource. As valuable metals contained in spent catalyst are in different chemical status and are highly mixed, the difficulty for their recovery lies in how to enhance leaching efficiency and separate different elements from each other efficiently. Till now, the leaching process has been studied fully while the separation of elements is complicated and reagent consumed. Herein, a novel promising method for separation valuable elements was introduced by using a carbothermic reduction process. In the new method, thermodynamic calculation method was used to predict the reaction mechanism and optimum conditions for carbothermic reduction. After carbothermimc reduction, metal oxides were transformed to compounds with obvious property differences using a carbothermic reduction method. Subsequently, the generated compounds were separated from each other through simple operations. This new route for recovery of valuable elements from spent hydrotreating catalyst not only dramatically reduce the handling cost and simplify handling procedure, but also make the recycling process much more environmentally friendly.

 

 

Keynote Session:

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Pratik Desai photo

Pratik Desai

Perlemax Ltd., UK

Title: Waste factory – Microbubble mediated ammonia recovery processes (MMARP)

Biography:

Pratik Desai is the R&I Director of Perlemax Ltd., MEng (1st hons) Chemical Engineering w Fuel technology, PhD in Chemical Engineering. He has expertise in microbubble generation, fluidics, is a co-inventor of Desai-Zimmerman Fluidic Oscillator (for generating microbubbles), and has led pioneering work on hot microbubble injection in thin liquid layers including scale up. Pratik has extensive experience in microbubble generation, visualisation, fluid dynamics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and associated phenomena, fluidics and reaction catalysis. He has worked on/working on lab scale and scale up of 5 different pilot plant processes developing several new technologies. He has designed disruptive solutions to conventional unit operations (microbubble distiller/condenser, microbubble stripper, and microbubble sorption) and translated them from blue-sky research ideas to POC and pilot scale within 2 years. He has also managed several projects and led technical innovations including implementation of microbubbles for ammonia-water- carbon dioxide reaction dynamics and catalysis, bioethanol production and separation, bioreactor design, bagged microbial reactors, fermenters, aquaculture, anaerobic digestion enhancement, foam dynamics, CO2 capture and sequestration–with Ionic liquids, MEA, and mineral carbonation, biodiesel production, micro/nanobubble drug delivery and WWA-self actuated wastewater aeration unit. He has also worked on microbial and algal based engineered communities in order to selectively uptake heavy metal ions from waste streams as well as algal growth and bioreactor development. Following on that, he is working on the ‘Waste Factory’- a concept developed by him and Professor Zimmerman which works towards a cascading circular economy approach in order to remediate waste and generate products; converting liabilities and remediating the waste streams into valorised products and energy-‘Waste Factory’-DZ MMARP. He has demonstrated each process in this cycle on the lab scale as a PoC and is leading a £3.8Mn application with academic and industrial partners in the UK and India. He is sole inventor of an energy efficient micro/nanodroplet generation method and a novel gas enrichment processing solution. He is lead technologist/lead/co-lead on grants/projects totaling £6.1Mn (overall £13.4Mn). He has successfully run an internship scheme with over 200 members comprising of assistant professors, postdoctoral researchers, doctoral candidates, process engineers, M level, and UG students from across the world. He has consulted/consulting over 45 industrial collaborators/industrial projects. He was a finalist for the IChemE Global Awards 2017 for the Young Researcher Award. His project on Anaerobic Digestion with biogas sweetening is a finalist for the ADBA global awards for best research project and has been highly commended.

 

Abstract:

Ammonia is used ubiquitously and underpins modern human life and population growth, ever growing in volumes of use and within waste produced. With 250MT produced per annum, over 2% of the world's total energy output is used for ammonia production. Less than 2mgL-1 is harmful to flora and fauna but most waste streams contain between 500 mgL-1-4000mgL-1 making this pernicious chemical highly problematic to deal with it.  Physico-chemical processes recover ammonia but are not highly effective in terms of efficiencies and either have limited operating ranges or high operating/capital expenditures. They might also require further downstream processing. Desai and Zimmerman, with their team, developed a novel approach – microbubble stripping – via hot microbubble injection in thin liquid layers. The process is able to reduce the ammonia concentration 300 times faster than conventional stripping (industrial benchmark) and has several unique features including the ability to strip ammonia at a pH of less than 8 as well as increasing the optical transparency of the remnant liquor. Desai and Zimmerman using this as a primary processing step were then able to design an entire waste factory basing it on a cascading circular economy approach and demonstrate these on a larger than lab scale. The approach uses a combination of physical chemistry (to remove ammonia), biotechnology (microbial algal communities to selectively target BOD/COD and heavy metal ion removal) and reactive separation of the waste ammonia to upgrade it into tuneable salts of ammonia carbamate and carbonate. The key feature of this entire cycle is that what was once a liability, costing approximately £10-£20 per m3 to treat, is now generating a revenue and waste heat, upto £5-£15 per m3 depending on the selected products. This process is proven on the lab scale and larger than lab scale ( 10m3 per day) and will be scaled up for an on site process to be implemented, scheduled in 2020, for 80-100m3 per day plant ( typical size of leachate lagoon – 50 -100m3 per day) .  Figure 1 shows the process cycle.

 

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Shalin Shah photo

Shalin Shah

Adani Ports & SEZ Ltd. (APSEZ), India

Title: Convert waste to wealth through 5R principles of waste management

Biography:

Shalin Maheshkumar Shah has completed masters in environment management (gold medalist) in 2008. 20 years of experience in the field of Environment Management. He has experience on Climate Change mitigation & adaptation, Value addition to wastes, Cleaner Production, Waste to Energy, Clean Development Mechanism & Multilateral Environmental Agreements. He has around 20 publications for national and international seminars. Currently he is working with Adani Group since April 2011 and heading Environment department since Nov 2015 for Adani Ports across the India. Some of the leading projects include Zero Waste Initiatives, Carbon footprint assessment, and Sustainability Reporting as per GRI-G4.

 

Abstract:

Environment regulations allow disposal of waste through landfill or incineration. This is mere conversion of waste from one phase to another and it also has disadvantage of loss of land and resources. Waste hierarchy suggests to focus on prevention first and disposal at last. Between these two ends one has to explore various options for reduce, reuse, reprocess, recycle and recovery of waste. These 5R principles of waste management have become essential for Sustainable Development.  Port & logistics generates four types of wastes i.e. Municipal Solid Waste, Industrial waste, Bio-medical Waste and E-waste. APSEZ has developed a vision of becoming – a zero waste company by 2020. All wastewaters are reuse for Horticulture purpose. MSW includes paper, plastic, metal, glass, rubber; scrap etc. is segregated at source, sent for recycling. Non-recyclable waste is handled through combustion without use of fuel or electricity. All biodegradable waste is converted to manure and same is used in-house for horticulture purpose. E-waste including other materials such as metals, plastic etc, Used oil/spent oil, and Downgrade chemicals from on board tanks of ships are sold to registered recyclers. Oily water received from vessels (slope) is pumped tangentially in the Oil Water Separator. Separated oil is sold to registered recyclers. Oily cotton waste & pig waste is sent to cement industry for co-processing through cement kiln. These practices results in saving of land, resources, money, emission, pollution and help generate revenue in some cases. Time has come to focus on value added initiatives to make business Sustainable.

 

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Nader Noureldeen Mohamed photo

Nader Noureldeen Mohamed

Cairo University, Egypt

Title: Benefits and impacts of re-use of agricultural drainage water in egypt to land degradation and food security

Biography:

Abstract:

Egypt is not plentiful in agriculture resources, whereby the total cultivated land is only 3.6 million ha, and total renewable freshwater is only 62 Billion Cubic Meter (BCM) for 104 million people (the annual water resources in Egypt depend mainly on the Nile water (55.5 BCM), 5.5 BCM groundwater, and 1.3 BCM of rain water that falls on the agricultural land in the Delta, in addition to reuses of wastewater about 20 bcm). Agricultural drainage water contains appreciable amounts of salts, residual fertilizers and pesticides which have negative impacts on soil properties and food productions. Most of the groundwater in Egypt is non-renewable except for the shallow groundwater in the Nile valley and Delta lands and its fringes in addition to some depression sources and oasis like Wadi El-Natrun in the west Delta (the Valley of Sodium salts) and Siwa oasis south of the northwest coast of Mediterranean. The water shortage in Egypt exceeds 42 BCM/year with Egypt’s water share per capita being 600 m/year. This severe shortage of water resources and arable lands in addition to growing population are one of the reasons why Egypt is one of the largest food importers in the world. Egypt is the biggest importer of wheat (12 million tons/year), and fourth importer of maize at 8.5 million tons/year and the seventh biggest importer of edible oils in the world, with a gap, reached 100% of lentil, 70% of broad bean, and 32% of sugar and 60% of red meat, butter, and milk powder. There are several impacts of food and water insecurity and socioeconomic impacts such as the soaring price of food, and small and tiny farm. More than 80% of land tenure and ownership is less than 0.8 ha in addition to very low share land per capita not exceeding 0.14 acres and continuous increase in poverty rate, which reached 27.8% at the end of the year 2016. To deal with this food insecurity, Egypt counts on major reclamation projects for an addition of more than 1 million acres as an extension to the present agricultural land located in North Sinai, at Toshka in the southwest valley and the Oweinat project in the far south of the western desert near the border with Libya. Agriculture related policies in Egypt should be reformed to plan and advances increased food production especially the essential crops such as wheat, maize, sugar, lentils and broad bean, oilseed, and meat and dairy products. Moreover, Egypt should make serious efforts to find new sources of water to combat water shortage, which may include untraditional sources such as desalination of seawater, treated sewage and treated industry water, and reclaimed agricultural drainage water, and also develop and renovate the whole agricultural system.

 

Oral Session 1:

  • Recycling | Solid waste Recycling | Entrepreneurs Investment Meet: Recycling Expo-2018
Speaker

Chair

Davis L Ford

The University of Texas, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Christer Forsgren

Stena Recycling International AB, Sweden

Meetings International - Recycling 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Ramadan A Mohamed, photo

Ramadan A Mohamed,

Assiut University, Egypt

Title: Recycling of keratin resources to produce water stable, soluble and the smallest worldwide nano-keratin

Biography:

Ramadan Mohamed has completed his PhD at the age of 36 years from Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University, Hanover, Germany and Postdoctoral Studies from School of Microbiology, Assiut University, Egypt. He is one of the staff members of the Centre of Excellence (Biochemistry and molecular biology) of Faculty of Science, Assiut University. He has published more than 13 papers in reputed journals.  He has Patented the melanoprotein the key protein in fungal pathogenicity of apple scab disease (EP2487237A1; 2012.08.15; Google), DE1 0 20110 00701A 1 2012.08.16) and, in the meantime, he is involved in a project for the future of nano-keratin.   
 

 

Abstract:

Keratin is a structural protein and considers as a key material in hair, nails, wool, feathers and the outer layer of human skin building up. Keratin has mostly studied for the use in cosmetics (hair care) products because it makes up 95% of hair structure. Nano-keratin is the result of a special manufacturing system that produces tiny particles. With this technology, tiny cracks in the hair can be sealed to bring the hair back to its optimum health. The smaller is the size of the nano-keratin, the greater is the success of the product in penetrating and filling small gaps of the hair. In a recent study, Xu et al., 2014 developed nano-keratin in a size of 70nm. Here, we have developed a new based chemical technique to create the world´s smallest nano-size of the nano-keratin (3.03-4.41nm). Besides, in our research, the synthesized nano-keratin particles showed particular properties such as solubility and stability in water, compatibility. This addresses one of the disadvantages of current products in the market that contains dangerous ingredients (formaldehyde). In our method, the principal steps of nano-keratin synthesis included solubilization, precipitation and self-folding, washing, and solubilizing the nano product at pH around 7. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the shape of the produced nano-keratin was sub-spherical. We are expecting that the future of cosmetics and any other pharmaceutical products (drug delivery, ion and other nanoparticles stabilization) will be more efficient and safer products. Now, the keratin nanoparticle can be produced on a pilot scale

Meetings International - Recycling 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Ndayambaje Jean Bernard photo

Ndayambaje Jean Bernard

University of Rwanda, Rwanda

Title: Fermentation strategy for enhancing phytase production under D-mannitol co-induction in pichia pastoris

Biography:

Dr. Ndayambaje Jean Bernard is a lecturer in the University of Rwanda. He holds PhD. of Technology in Industrial Biotechnology from Anna University and MSc. in Chemical engineering from XiamenUniversity. The first intention of his research orientation is in cloning technology, optimization andexpression at small scale and large scale fermentation. Furthermore I’m International Membership in the Technical committee/RSB of Quality assurance of Pharmaceuticals and Quality Management System and also Associate editor in the journal of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology and African Journal of Biotechnology.

 

Abstract:

The addition of D-mannitol with methanol as a co-substrate at the induction phase during fermentation by Pichia pastoris (Mut+) is a new beneficial technology for recombinant protein production. The major challenges as heat generation and high oxygen demand are increasing during induction phases with methanol at large scale and this causes high oxygen demand during cultivation. One possible way to reduce the oxygen demand for getting more protein productivity is the addition of D-mannitol along with methanol during induction time. The promoter of alcohol oxidase I (AOX1) gene in P. pastoris is exclusively matched for the controlled expression of foreign genes and the high levels of foreign proteins can be expressed, even if they are lethal to the cell. The co-feeding strategy was optimized to produce phytase activity of 10280 U/ml compare to methanol fed alone and which it could be used as food additives for non ruminant animals. A deep understanding of the regulation of AOX1 promoter, the physiology of the cells and which are being used to govern protein production during methanol/D-mannitol strategy is still not developed at large.

Meetings International - Recycling 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Abdellatif Lajdel photo

Abdellatif Lajdel

Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), Bangladesh

Title: Treatment of tannery effluent by electrocoagulation

Biography:

Md Abdul Jalil is a Professor of Civil Engineering Department at Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology (BUET), Dhaka, Bangladesh. He received his BSc in Civil Engineering in 1986 from BUET. He obtained his MSc in Civil Engineering in 1988 from the same university. He received his PhD in Civil Engineering in 1993 from Tokyo University, Japan under ADB Scholarship. He conducted Post-doctoral research on Water Management in Loughborough University, UK under Commonwealth Fellowship. He was appointed as a Lecturer in the Department of Civil Engineering of BUET in 1986. He was promoted to the post of Assistant Professor in 1989. He became Associate Professor in 1996 and Professor in 2001. He has published over 36 papers upto now. His current research areas are biogas generation from solid wastes, water and wastewater treatment technologies, and rain water harvesting. He also works as a Consultant and completed over 45 important national development projects.

 

Abstract:

Electrocoagulation (EC) has been studied extensively throughout the world during the last decade for the treatment of various types of water and wastewater. The optimum treatment times, current densities and initial pH have been reported in the literature in the range of 5-60 minutes, 10-150 A/m2 and near neutral pH respectively for mostly high removal efficiencies. Both operating cost and electricity consumption costs have been indicated to vary between 0.0047-6.74 €/m3 and 0.002-58.0 kWh/m3. As EC has great potential in the field of water and wastewater purification, a study was carried out to determine the efficiency of EC to treat tannery effluent of Hazaribag, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total of three raw effluent samples were collected from Hazaribag area and were treated in the Environmental Engineering Laboratory of BUET. The samples were tested for color, turbidity, BOD and COD. Stainless steel electrodes were used and batch experiments were conducted with 1.5L capacity of the reactor at three different current densities (70, 140 and 210 A/m2). For each experimental run, samples were taken out from the reactor after 20, 40, 80 and 160 minutes flow of current. All these samples were then filtered and analyzed for color, turbidity, BOD and COD. Analysis of the results showed that the color removal efficiency varied from 48.3% to 98.7% having the best performance (86.4-98.7% removal efficiency) at the current density of 140 A/m2. The turbidity removal efficiency was found to be in the range of 82.4-99.6% with the best performance (98.9-99.6% removal efficiency) for the current density of 140 A/m2. The BOD5 removal efficiency varied from 49.6 to 93.3% and the best performance (80.9-93.3% removal efficiency) was at the current density of 140 A/m2. At the same current density, the COD removal efficiency varied within a very narrow range (76.3-78%) whereas it varied greatly (35-78%) when all the data were considered. The experimental results revealed that the optimum time and current density were 40 minutes and 140 A/m2 respectively for removal of color, turbidity, BOD and COD from the tannery effluent, and EC is an efficient process for treating tannery effluent especially for color and turbidity. The treated effluent can be recycled for various purposes. 

 

Meetings International - Recycling 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Md. Abdul Jalil photo

Md. Abdul Jalil

Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), Bangladesh

Title: Treatment of tannery effluent by electrocoagulation

Biography:

Md Abdul Jalil is a Professor of Civil Engineering Department at Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology (BUET), Dhaka, Bangladesh. He received his BSc in Civil
Engineering in 1986 from BUET. He obtained his MSc in Civil Engineering in 1988 from the same university. He received his PhD in Civil Engineering in 1993 from Tokyo University,
Japan under ADB Scholarship. He conducted Post-doctoral research on Water Management in Loughborough University, UK under Commonwealth Fellowship. He was
appointed as a Lecturer in the Department of Civil Engineering of BUET in 1986. He was promoted to the post of Assistant Professor in 1989. He became Associate Professor in
1996 and Professor in 2001. He has published over 36 papers upto now. His current research areas are biogas generation from solid wastes, water and wastewater treatment
technologies, and rain water harvesting. He also works as a Consultant and completed over 45 important national development projects.

Abstract:

Electrocoagulation (EC) has been studied extensively throughout the world during the last decade for the treatment of various types of water and wastewater. The optimum treatment times, current densities and initial pH have been reported in the literature in the range of 5-60 minutes, 10-150 A/m2 and near neutral pH respectively for mostly high removal efficiencies. Both operating cost and electricity consumption costs have been indicated to vary between 0.0047-6.74 €/m3 and 0.002-58.0 kWh/m3. As EC has great potential in the field of water and wastewater purification, a study was carried out to determine the efficiency of EC to treat tannery effluent of Hazaribag, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total of three raw effluent samples were collected from Hazaribag area and were treated in the Environmental Engineering Laboratory of BUET. The samples were tested for color, turbidity, BOD and COD. Stainless steel electrodes were used and batch experiments were conducted with 1.5L capacity of the reactor at three different current densities (70, 140 and 210 A/m2). For

each experimental run, samples were taken out from the reactor after 20, 40, 80 and 160 minutes flow of current.All these samples were then filtered and analyzed for color, turbidity, BOD and COD. Analysis of the results showed that the color removal efficiency varied from 48.3% to 98.7% having the best performance (86.4-98.7% removal efficiency) at the current density of 140 A/m2. The turbidity removal efficiency was found to be in the range of 82.4-99.6% with the best performance (98.9-99.6% removal efficiency) for the current density of 140 A/m2. The BOD5 removal efficiency varied from 49.6 to 93.3% and the best performance (80.9-93.3% removal efficiency) was at the current density of 140 A/m2. At the same current density, the COD removal efficiency varied within a very narrow range (76.3-78%) whereas it varied greatly (35-78%) when all the data were considered. The experimental results revealed that the optimum time and current density were 40 minutes and 140 A/m2 respectively for removal of color, turbidity, BOD and COD from the tannery effluent, and EC is an efficient process for treating tannery effluent especially for color and turbidity. The treated effluent can be recycled for various purposes.

 

Meetings International - Recycling 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Ann T W YU photo

Ann T W YU

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

Title: Onsite generation of electricity from discharged urine from male toilets in non-residential buildings

Biography:

Ann T.W. Yu is an Associate Professor in the Department of Building and Real Estate of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. She has 15+ years of experience in the field of
construction and demolition waste. Dr. Yu teaches in both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, conducting research projects and carrying out consultancy services. Her
research interest includes C&D waste management, construction project management, value management, building procurement systems and sustainable construction. She
has a strong track record and has published extensively on the broad theme of project management in leading construction management journals and international internal
conference proceedings.

Abstract:

This research study explores the potential for producing electricity from discharged urine in the daily operation of male toilets in non-residential buildings. The majority of the population in metropolitan cities lives in these high-rise buildings apart from residential buildings. High-rise buildings consume large amounts of energy in daily operation and release considerable amounts of waste including human urine into the environment. In addition, untreated urine from urinal of these buildings contains polluting organic compounds and requires energy-consuming treatment prior to discharge into waterways. Urea is a major composition of urine. Urea contains four hydrogen atoms which are less tightly bonded than H2O in water. Hydrogen, which is a clean source of energy, is considered by scientists as a promising fuel for future. Hydrogen and urea are produced in electrolysis of urine (Fig. 1). The generated hydrogen gas can be utilized to generate electricity for building operations. Ohio University in the USA has developed Ammonia Green Box® which can extract hydrogen gas directly from urine by electrochemical oxidation using an economical catalyst. Electricity is produced from the electrolysis of hydrogen gas in a hydrogen fuel cell. The simple and convenient hydrogen extraction process is suitable to be applied highrise developments. Production of electricity from urine can reduce power supply from the grid system and subsequently reduce building management cost.