Agenda

Schedule

Full-day Events with Awesome Speakers

Wednesday, November 28

10.00-10-40
Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Myrna Martin photo

Myrna Martin

Earth Sky Foundation, Canada

Title

Attachment: The template of physical and mental health

Biography

Myrna Martin is a Family Therapist, Teacher of Pre and Perinatal Psychology, and an approved teacher of Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy. She teaches across the USA and Canada, United Kingdom, Taiwan, New Zealand and Europe. The fields she focuses on includes pre and perinatal therapy with focus on the early developmental trauma resolution model. She has taught a two and a half year training in Pre and Perinatal Psychology (PPN) 7 times. Her next training will be in Santa Cruz, CA. beginning in Nov. 2018. Myrna has produced an 80 hour video series "Healing Early Developmental Trauma" which include hundreds of pages of notes, articles and references as well as group support calls. In July 2014 Myrna began three levels of two week intensives in PPN that includes theoretical knowledge, as well as in depth personal exploration of participant's own early history, in a residential format at her Retreat Center in Nelson, BC. 

Abstract

The attachment process from birth to eighteen months of age lays down a template in our bodies for our physical and mental health lifelong.  This biological communication between a newborn and developing infant and their caregivers create the relationship this baby has to themselves, to others, their ability to cope with stress, their ability to learn.  This process deeply influences the development of the autonomic nervous system. This, in turn, impacts the growing organs in a way in which the physical health of the cardiovascular system, the immune system, the glucose regulating system, and other important organs are vigorous or compromised.  The Adverse Childhood Experiences research further delineates these influences.

 

11.00-11.40
Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Emily McWhirter photo

Emily McWhirter

Royal Hospital for Neuro disability,UK

Title

Nursing patients with a profound brain injury: managing complex ethical issues with compassion at the end of life

Biography

Dr Emily McWhirter is the Director of Nursing at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability in London, UK. The hospital specialises in caring for patients with profound disability following acquired brain injury, as a result of major trauma or severe medical illness. Emily has been a nurse for over 30 years. She has a PhD in nursing management, with research interests in major trauma, patients experience, and nursing leadership and education.

 

 

Abstract

Caring for patients at the end of their lives is a challenging but essential part of the role of a nurse.  Providing an environment where patients can feel pain free, calm and at peace is an important part of this care, and supporting relatives and friends to come to terms with the death of a loved one takes skill, compassion and empathy. Experience and insight help nurses to manage these processes well but critical to providing high quality care at the end of life lies in high quality education and training.The Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability (RHN) provides care for patients who have an acquired brain injury. A number of these patients have a diagnosis of a prolonged disorders of consciousness (PDOC), including vegetative (VS) and minimally conscious states (MCS). They may remain in the hospital for the rest of their lives. For some, this may be for many years, even decades. Caring for patients in VS or MCS is complex. Over time, nursing and healthcare staff come to know these patients and their family and friends very well.The laws around withdrawal of clinically assisted food and hydration in the UK are clear. Decisions   around treatment plans and resuscitation status are made in the best interests of each patient and yet the ethical issues that evolve as a result challenge every individual who plays a role in the provision of care. Cultural, religious and personal views are important to all staff and cannot be ignored.Establishing a bespoke training programme for staff from multiple cultures, faiths and perspectives who are involved in end of life care has enabled staff groups to address the issues around ethics, the law, best interests and conflict in a way that has united the workforce to deliver a high-quality service in a complex speciality, at the end of life.

 

 

11.40-12-20
Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Michelle Carter photo

Michelle Carter

City University London, UK

Title

An exploration of Indian nurses motivation to nurse : a matter of service or economic gain and social mobility

Biography

Michelle currently works a City University of London as the Programme Director: Mentorship : Supporting & Assessing Learning in Practice Settings and Practice Lead for Adult nursing students. Michelle has previously worked as a Senior Lecturer at Buckinghamshire New University and Kingston University & St Georges University, London. This followed a successful nursing career as a District Nursing Sister and as an Intermediate Care Nurse. Michelle has taught a range of subjects latterly with a focus on Public Health, Culture & Diversity in Healthcare, Professional Nursing and Management of Long term conditions.Michelle has an MSc in Medical Anthropology and has a keen interest in culture, expressions of illness and how nurses cope with this. Michelle is currently in the final phase of her PhD exploring the experiences of Indian nurses coming to the UK to study and work.Michelle has an MSc Medical Anthropology; BSc Community Nursing (District Nurse); PGCE; Nurse Prescriber; Diploma In Nursing (Adult); BA (Hons) Business Studies

 

Abstract

 

The aim of this paper is to explore the context of the decision making process to become a nurse in India for both the male and female nurses, examining the differences between the genders. Nursing itself has changed there are different way of performing nursing which has led in part to the reduction of stigma associated with nursing. Nursing is associated with much more positive prospects in terms of career, travel and earning potential. This has attracted more men to the profession and led to more non-Christian nurses taking up the profession. Nursing at first glance appears ungendered as with other professional roles however both men and women show how gender can be fluid and adaptable within nursing. Two distinct explanations exist for what it means to be a nurse one feminine and the other masculine. For the female nurses the profession is one that encompasses service to others and duty a way to honour ones religion, community and family. Nursing is closely aligned with the aptitudes of a mother that is to care and nurture. The masculine explanation of nursing is concerned with career and social development, one linked to economic gain and status with little mention of care as a motivation to nurse. Through my ethnographic work I revealed clear differences and contrasting views of the male and female nurse’s career aspirations. The discussion with the nurses demonstrates how they fulfil they gender roles but also offer insights in to how nursing can support changes in gender roles, such as the women becoming the main breadwinner and financially secure. The male nurse, by expressing an economic motivation to become a nurse, would be able to fulfil his expected role as a son and husband; the primary contributor to the family’s finances.

 

12.20-13.00
Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Suzie Adam photo

Suzie Adam

Royal Hospital for Neuro-Disability, UK

Title

Enhancing the patient experience; how do we create and manage high quality patients’ experience of care in a complex brain injury setting?

Biography

Suzie Adam is the Head of Nursing at the Royal Hospital for Neuro disability in London, UK. The hospital specialises in caring for patients with profound disability following acquired brain injury, as a result of major trauma or severe medical illness. Suzie has extensive experience in caring for and leading teams working with some of the most challenging in-patients, from forensic mental health units, challenging behaviour, personality disorder and addictions to CAMHS and post-acute brain injury.

 

Abstract

Caring for patients who have a range of mental health, physical illness and long term conditions presents us at the Royal Hospital for Neuro Disability (RHN) with a nursing and organizational challenge. Hugely differing needs, from short-stay neuro-rehabilitation to long term care sometimes spanning decades, as well as behavioural challenges and advancing progressive diseases means we need to look critically at how we provide our treatment and care in a way that is truly bespoke.A hospital becoming a home; for many their injury will mean years of being in our hospital, sometimes for the rest of their lives and the impact this has cannot be underestimated. We therefore have evolved as a community as well as hospital and have to continually balance a fine line between normalizing our patients lives, providing leisure and meaningful activity as well ensuring they are safe and still have access to sometimes complex nursing and medical care. Because we are unlike normal hospitals we need to think broadly outside of the box!

Quality of life is the focus and assessable, specially-adapted activities are provided with the support of a large team of volunteers. Using technology and innovation as well as blue-sky thinking have been part of a journey that we are still on.

Supporting our staff with the emotional burden of caring for such a patient group is a huge part of how we can be successful in caring for our patient’s and ensuring they can live their best life. Recognising that their training needs are not just limited to typical nurse competencies and managing physical health has been a new development and one that has seen us create a bespoke training program, accredited by the Royal College of Nursing.

 

 

Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Keynote Speaker Hana Kadhom photo

Hana Kadhom

University of Royal College of Surgeon, UK

Title

The perceived level of knowledge of cervical cancer among female medical and nursing students in Bahrain

Biography

Hana Kadhom has 35 Years’ experience in nursing as a practitioner and educator. Her experience spans across the Middle East and UK.  She obtained her PhD in 1989 from Hull University (UK) and she has postgraduate diploma from British Universities (in nursing education and health and safety), she has supervised many postgraduate theses and is a former senior lecturer and Director of the Nursing Degree Bridging program at the Royal College of Surgeons Medical University in Ireland-Bahrain & Saudi Aramco.

 

Abstract

Cervical cancer is a leading cause of female mortality worldwide. Screening programs are invaluable in achieving: prevention, diagnosis and early intervention. The Papanicolaou (Pap) smear test is one of the most prominent of these programs and has been proven to be highly effective. Female healthcare professionals need to be knowledgeable about the Human papillomavirus (HPV). This need is born out of their own needs, primarily as women and members of the public. Moreover, knowledge should also improve their effectiveness as professionals.This cross-sectional study assessed knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the cervical cancer among students in Bahrain using a self-administered questionnaire. 192 females medical (n=44) and nursing (n=148) students were surveyed in 2016

Only one third of participants (65/192) correctly identified that a virus, spread sexually, was a major cause of cervical cancer. There was a significant difference in the proportion of medical and nursing students that answered this question correctly; medical 37 (84.1%) and nursing 28 (18.9%). The odds ratio for nursing students answering this question incorrectly was 4.4 (CI 95% 3.1 - 6.4).This study also suggests that future female healthcare workers maybe expected to be well informed on this topic in both their professional and personal capacity, but less than 1 in 5 of nursing students were aware of HPV in relation to cervical cancer. This indicates that there is a need to increase public awareness of HPV and risk factors for its spread in Bahrain. 

 

  • Evidence-Based Nursing | Evidence Based Non Clinical Practice| Reproductive Health Nursing| Cancer Nursing| Mental Health Nursing| Surgical Nursing| Cardiac Nursing| Orthopaedic Nursing| Male Nursing| Holistic Nursing
    Location: Conference Hall

Session Introduction: Wednesday, November 28

Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Session Speaker Kuldeep Singh  photo

Kuldeep Singh

Ian Donald School, India

Title

Anomaly Scan: Paradigm shift from the second to the first trimester

Biography

Dr. Kuldeep Singh is practicing in South Delhi and is known for his skills in Ultrasound in Ob, Gyn and Infertility. He has authored 16 books on Ultrasound in Obs, Gyn and Infertility. His books have been translated into Spanish, Chineseand Portuguese. He was awarded the IMAGING SCIENCE AWARD in the AICOG in Delhi. He is presently the President of the Delhi Chapter of IFUMB. With teaching as his passion he is presently running Ultrasound Teaching Modules in Basic and Advanced Ultrasound in Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Infertility.

 

Abstract

Ultrasound is an essential tool for any obstetric practise. When it started five decades ago little did we realise that this invention is a technological marvel. One could look into the presentation and the viability of the fetus. Acrania could be excluded in the third trimester and with ultrasound machines and probes getting better we could exclude that in the second trimester so called Level II scan. With high resolution probes and high frequency transvaginal probes one can now diagnose fetal abnormalities in the late first trimester. This avoids the mental trauma the mother and the family have to go through and lethal abnormalities can be terminated much earlier. Acrania, anencephaly, gross dysraphic disorganisation of the fetal spine, anterior thoracic and abdominal wall defects and gross limb abnormalities are few structural malformations that can be detected with ease as early as 11-12 weeks. Apart from structural abnormalities the index of suspicion for chromosomal abnormalities also is there with looking at the nuchal translucency, nasal bone and flow through the tricuspid valve and in the ductus venosus. Combined testing with a dual test increases the sensitivity manifold. What is most important is the knowhow of what to look and how to look in your 11-14 weeks scan.

 

 

Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Session Speaker Mursi  Jbara photo

Mursi Jbara

Rabin Medical Center, Israel

Title

Second victim: prevalence, symptoms and support perception

Biography

He had completed his  nursing BA degree in 1998 in Tel-Aviv University and public health MA degree (MPH) in 2013 in Ben-Gurion University. Now days he is studying PhD at Tel-Aviv University in the department of epidemiology and these days he is moving to stage B. Until two years ago, He worked as nursing director in internal department in Beilinson hospital. And for the past two years He has been working as coordinator of nursing research in Rabin Medical Center (Beilinson and Hasharon hospitals) and in the context of research coordinator he lead researches such Operating Room, Complexity and Variety of Quality Projects

 

 

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patient safety adverse events (PSEs) cause harm and suffer to patients and their families (first victim). However, the involved health care providers (HCPs) can also become victims (second victim-SV). The prevalence of SV phenomenon varies from 10.4% to 43.3%.

OBJECTIVES: Measurement the prevalence of PSE exposure and risk factors, symptoms and support perception among exposed.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study, conducted at Rabin Medical Center, Israel. The data were collected by using a validated self-reporting questionnaire, based on a convenience sampling of HCPs.

RESULTS: A total of 870 HCPs responded, 630 (70%) of them reported to be involved in PSEs. There was no difference in the prevalence of PSEs by profession / education of the HCPs. The participants without any academic education and those with a BA degree perceive less substantial responses whereas physicians assessed the most severe response to PSEs (3.8, 4.02, 4.08 p <.05, respectively).

Those who reported to be involved in PSEs tended to agree that the involvement in PSEs might cause  negative responses, including feelings of guilt, anger, anxiety, shame, tiredness and sleeping difficulties. At the same time, the respondents agreed that these HCPs need an organizational support.

Participants who were involved or knew colleagues who were involved in PSEs (n = 630) assessed the risk of developing negative responses after the event higher than those who were not involved in PSEs or were not familiar with these cases (n = 151) (3.98 vs. 3.56, p <.001). These subjects also had higher need for support (4.91 vs. 4.69, p <.05). In addition, it was agreed that the existing support is insufficient, and that the hospital should invest more in supporting these HCPs.

CONCLUSIONS: SV phenomenon is widespread among all HCPs, which require centrally organized support to promote a positive safety environment.

 

Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Session Speaker Paula Rodriguez Gomez photo

Paula Rodriguez Gomez

Gregorio Maranon General University Hospital, Spain

Title

Educational project. Application of osteopathic medicine in the neonatal and infant period

Biography

Paula Rodríguez has just started in the world of research after finishing college in 2018. Without having any previous experience in research, she has presented this project that aims to achieve an improvement in maternal and child health care, area in which she wants to focus her studies. She is currently working in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Mother-Child Hospital belonging to the Gregorio Marañón General University Hospital, in which she intends to implement the educational project presented.

 

Abstract

Statement of the Problem: Osteopathic medicine is a form of drug-free, non-invasive manual medicine, classified as a complementary and alternative medicine. It involves manual contact of body structures with slight pressures that, in addition, produce a stimulating effect of the organism's own health resources. All this suggests that its indication in the neonatal and infant period should be high, being necessary to know its contribution during this period, especially in the most vulnerable newborns, premature infants. Many studies and cases have shown the existence of clinical and scientific evidence on the benefits of this manual therapy in some of the pathologies present in childhood. Due to the close relationship between nursing professionals and their patients, nurses play a fundamental role in providing health education to patients. For this reason, this educational project focuses on nursing professionals in the NICU of Mother-Child Hospital belonging to the Gregorio Marañón General University Hospital, with the aim of making them aware of the great benefits provided by this therapy during the neonatal and infancy periods; in addition to the pathologies which respond well to osteopathic treatment, and how to recognize and select a legally accredited osteopath. Thus, in many cases, improvements in children’s health would be seen, as well as a reduction in the costs associated with these diseases.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: I conducted a systematic review, aiming to answer the following clinical question: Know the scientific evidence of osteopathic manipulation in the neonatal and infant period.Findings: Searching retrieved 136 articles. After the removal of conference abstracts and those which didn´t have free access to the full abstracts, 27 articles were evaluated.

Conclusion & Significance: In this systematic review, I evaluated the efficacy of the Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment based on clinical cases that reported disorders, such as: infant colic, suction problems, plagiocephaly.

 

Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Session Speaker Ramanjeet Singh photo

Ramanjeet Singh

Birla Vidya Niketan, New Delhi, India

Title

Challenges of nursing

Biography

Abstract

Nursing basically is an art of providing to the sick and instead of being worshipped has come under constant scrutiny and is being forced to face many challenges. Challenges like regional differences have penetrated through and has gradually led to the development of income inequalities. Not only this,  the nurses on a day to day basis are exposed to various diseases, pathogens as well as flu germs which affects their health adversely. Inspite of their gruelling schedules they are forced to work for longer hours and also for more shifts that to without any incentives. Often this leads to fatigue, lack of sleep and gradual development of a negative atmosphere. Societies have been very harsh on the women from the start but this problem has become more acute in the case of nurses as they have to face the violent behavior not only from their fellow workers but also from the patients. A lot of times due to shortage of staff the nurses are pressurized to work more which leads to burnout and as it is their job is extremely taxing. These challenges leave them dissatisfied with their jobs. This leads to less and less people being attracted and opting for this profession.

 

Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Session Speaker Kuldeep Singh  photo

Kuldeep Singh

Ian Donald School, India

Title

Workshop on fetal Growth restriction: Suspicion, diagnosis and management by ultrasound and color doppler

Biography

Dr. Kuldeep Singh is practicing in South Delhi and is known for his skills in Ultrasound in Ob, Gyn and Infertility. He has authored 16 books on Ultrasound in Obs, Gyn and Infertility. His books have been translated into Spanish, Chineseand Portuguese. He was awarded the IMAGING SCIENCE AWARD in the AICOG in Delhi. He is presently the President of the Delhi Chapter of IFUMB. With teaching as his passion he is presently running Ultrasound Teaching Modules in Basic and Advanced Ultrasound in Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Infertility

 

Abstract

A small for dates fetus is broadly any fetus with an estimated fetal weight below the tenth percentile. What is most important is to define and classify and segregate whether it is a constitutionally small for gestational age fetus which is normal in terms of perinatal outcome or a fetus with true fetal growth restriction which is going to show signs on ultrasound and color Doppler and also reflect a poor perinatal outcome.

This differentiation is done by meticulous search for signs on 2D ultrasound with charting of growth potential and Doppler ultrasound showing changes in cerebroplacental ratio and uterine arteries and umbilical artery. Once this is done we need to reclassify them as early or late onset fetal growth restriction. Further management strategies and decision of when and where to deliver are determined by changes in Doppler showing progressive fetal deterioration.

Which vessels to be insonated, what to infer, optimal time intervals to repeat the scan and when to deliver so as to minimize fetal injury and demise and to avoid risks of iatrogenic preterm delivery is the aim of this study.

 

  1. Turan OM, et al: Progression of Doppler abnormalities in intrauterine growth restriction. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2008;32:160-167.
  2. Batalle D, Eixarch E, Figueras F, Muñoz-Moreno E, Bargallo N, Illa M, Acosta-Rojas R, Amat-Roldan I, Gratacos E (2012). "Altered small-world topology of structural brain networks in infants with intrauterine growth restriction and its association with later neurodevelopmental outcome". NeuroImage. 60 (2): 1352–66
  3. Vergani P, et al: Prognostic value of uterine artery Doppler velocimetry in growth-restricted fetuses delivered near term. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2002;187:932-936.
  4. Ghosh GS, Gudmundsson S: Uterine and umbilical artery Doppler are comparable in predicting perinatal outcome of growth-restricted fetuses. BJOG 2009;116:424-430.
  5. Oros D, et al: Longitudinal changes in uterine, umbilical and fetal cerebral Doppler indices in late-onset small-for-gestational age fetuses. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2011;37:191-195.

 

 

 

Meetings International - Nursing Meetings 2018 Conference Session Speaker Myrna Martin photo

Myrna Martin

Earth Sky Foundation, Canada

Title

Workshop on Co-creating effective emotional communication in high risk families with Preschoolers: An essential for adult mental health

Biography

Myrna Martin is a Family Therapist, Teacher of Pre and Perinatal Psychology, and an approved teacher of Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy. She teaches across the USA and Canada, United Kingdom, Taiwan, New Zealand and Europe. The fields she focuses on includes pre and perinatal therapy with focus on the early developmental trauma resolution model. She has taught a two and a half year training in Pre and Perinatal Psychology (PPN) 7 times. Her next training will be in Santa Cruz, CA. beginning in Nov. 2018. Myrna has produced an 80 hour video series "Healing Early Developmental Trauma" which include hundreds of pages of notes, articles and references as well as group support calls. In July 2014 Myrna began three levels of two week intensives in PPN that includes theoretical knowledge, as well as in depth personal exploration of participant's own early history, in a residential format at her Retreat Center in Nelson, BC.

 

Abstract

This presentation outlines a somatic emotional based approach to therapeutic clinical work with high risk families with preschoolers. The neuroscience and attachment based research of the past two decades has shown us that early developmental trauma impacts physical and mental health lifelong. The relationship with self, others, stress coping abilities are all affected, as well as immune system, cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic health and our capacity to learn. Effective trauma informed treatment is essential and possible for pre schoolers who developed insecure or disorganized attachment. The cost of chronic illness in both developed and developing countries is skyrocketing, making the pressure on prevention, and early healing an economic and social issue as well as an individual family issue.Uitilizing video clips of one family, as an example, repatterning approaches will be demonstrated. This aboriginal mother was adopted, ran away at age 14, lived on the streets during four subsequent pregnancies. Two children born were adopted into other families, and an eight month old and a four year old child are with her. The referral agency was a Transition House. These clips include a prenatal repatterning of fear, protection games, and a spontaneous regression to infancy repatterning process and sand play photos. Community based supports include subsidized housing, home support, transportation, and attendance at free community family based play programs. The four year old girl gains a sense of safety and lovability with her mother, with a corresponding change in behaviors, in both child and mother.Greenspan’s Functional Emotional Assessment Scale (FEAS) were used pre and post treatment, with 25 families. A summary of outcomes will be presented, as well as qualitative outcomes reported by the families. Improved social emotional communication resulted in all but one family.  This family did not complete treatment as the mother was alcoholic, abusive, and was admitted to a lengthy rehabilitation residential program.  18 of these children were classified  “disorganized attachment” and 7 were ‘insecure’. Referrals came from the Transition House, Child/Youth Mental Health, Infant Development Services, Child Welfare, Early Childhood Educators. 

 

Trauma informed early intervention and treatment, in a safe setting, that focuses on the relationship between parents and child, that is a somatic and emotional based approach, is effective. Healing adverse childhood experiences and supporting the ongoing health and secure attachment in high risk families is possible, worthwhile, and cost effective.