International Conference on

Agriculture & Horticulture

Osaka, Japan   December 05-06, 2018

Scientific Program

Keynote Session:

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Stanislav Torma photo

Stanislav Torma

National Agricultural and Food Centre, Slovakia

Title: Soil quality from the point of view of nutrient transport

Biography:

Stanislav Torma is a Senior researcher in National Agricultural and Food Centre - Soil Science and Conservation Research Institute, Presov, Slovakia. He is the Principal Investigator of research works from the branch of plant nutrition, fertilization, nutrition balance, soil science, soil conversation and ecology. The results of his scientific work are presented in two monographies, 11 books and brochures and two academic texts for students and one university textbook. He is the author or co-author more than 20 scientific reports, more than 120 original scientific papers, almost 150 special papers. He is a member of Slovak Society of Soil Science and International Union of Soil Science (IUSS).

Abstract:

The transport soil function plays a dominant role in terms of transport and accumulation of substances in a vertical and horizontal direction in the soil. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the soil transport function on the base of present knowledge of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) transport in the soil. The evaluation of nutrient transport consists from the vertical transport in framework of the soil profile (especially the nitrates leaching) and horizontal transport caused by locality slope (water erosion). The amount of nitrified nitrogen in the soil is very important in this case. The phosphorus transport in the soil depends on “soil volume”, e.g. it depends on the soil depth and skeleton contents in the soil and naturally on the locality slope, too. The soil transport functions were classified in five categories: (1) very weak, (2) weak, (3) moderate, (4) strong and (5) very strong. According to the soil transport function information, the areas of individual categories of soil transport function in agricultural soils in Slovakia were created. Very weak, weak and moderate transport of nitrogen was recorded in almost 90% of agricultural soils in Slovakia and in 73% of agricultural soils in case of phosphorus transport. To these categories belong the deep soils (more than 0.6 m depth) with low amounts of gravel located on plains. More than a quarter of the area belongs to the category with strong and very strong transport of phosphorus. Especially in these localities (hilly landscape with shallow soils and/or with high content of gravel) can come to increased content of phosphorus in the water bodies and thus also to a decrease in water quality.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Sanghoon Kim photo

Sanghoon Kim

USDA/ARS/NCAUR, USA

Title: Encapsulation of essential oils into degradable microcapsules for controlled release

Biography:

Sanghoon Kim received Ph.D. in polymer physical chemistry from University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has worked in National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland for five years for the research in the field of polymer blends. After moving to USDA national lab in Peoria, Illinois, in 1997, he worked on the characterization of carbohydrates and proteins, and developed novel bio-based materials from agricultural products for industrial applications. His current research is focused on the development of nano- or micro- capsules that deliver agrochemicals for controlled release.

Abstract:

Many essential oils (EO’s) possess a wide spectrum of biological activity including anti-microbial, fungicidal, insecticidal/insect repellent, herbicidal, acaricidal and nematicidal properties. They provide a simple, inexpensive, and environmentally-friendly pest control. However, the volatility and water-insolubility of EO’s render their utilization as pesticide less appealing. To resolve these issues, EO’s were encapsulated into tiny shells (i.e., microparticles).

For the encapsulation of EO’s into microparticles, EO droplets were generated in the ethanol-water mixture through phase-separation. Subsequently, these tiny droplets were surrounded by protein molecules to prevent them from coalescing. Depending on the characteristics of employed proteins, the prepared microparticles showed different stabilities. For further stabilization of microparticles, the prepared microparticles were additionally coated with degradable synthetic polymer. The characteristics, encapsulation efficiency, and effective time of final products will be discussed.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Lyudmyla Symochko  photo

Lyudmyla Symochko

Uzhhorod National University, Ukraine

Title: Microbial communities in soil and antimicrobial resistance

Biography:

Symochko Lyudmya is a specialist in environmental microbiology and soil ecology. Since 2008 she has focused on autecology and synecology researches of soil microbiota. She explores the soil resistome and the role of natural and transformed ecosystems as reserves of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. She developing and improving existing methods of bioindication and biotesting the edaphotops in different biogeocenosis. She is an author of over 120 scientific publications and 55 in professional journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The World Health Organization has identified antibiotic resistance as a serious threat to human health across the world. The observed increase in the frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has resulted from the increased use of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture, resulting in the reduction of organisms that do not possess antibiotic resistance genes. The fluoroquinolones are one of the most used classes of antibiotics. Enrofloxacin belongs to the class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics that have been intensively used for the treatment of bacterial infections in veterinary medicine. In the environment, enrofloxacin can undergo degradations by different processes including photolysis, biodegradation and oxidation by mineral oxides but it is not sensitive to hydrolysis. Despite these degradation mechanisms, environmental half life time of enrofloxacin is very long. This long environmental persistence of enrofloxacin can affect the growing and the activity of the soil microbial communities.

Methodology: The effect of enrofloxacin on the function and structure of soil microbial communities was evaluated. Soil samples were spiked with enrofloxacin (10, 100, and 1000 mgkg-1) and were incubated for 30, 60, 90 days. Untreated controls received only water. In pots with different concentrations of enrofloxacin were planted: Lactuca sativa var. crispa, Anethum graveolens, Thymus serpillum, Mentha piperita, Calendula officinalis.

Results: Soil respiratory responses were inhibited at the high enrofloxacin concentrations (1000 mgkg-1) in the soils and were increased at the lowest concentration (10 mgkg-1). The maximum level of soil toxicity was 67.21% at concentration of enrofloxacin 1000 mgkg-1, in the control this parameter was 8, 56%. It should be noted, the soil with a high concentration of antibiotic was characterized by a low content of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and a high number of oligotrophic and spore-forming microbiota.  In vitro experiments were isolated 5 bacteria absolutely resistant to all tested antibiotics. Among AR microorganisms were anaerobic bacteria: Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and aerobic bacteria: Enterococcus faecalis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Enterobacter cloacae. Other dominant bacteria were characterized by a high or moderate level of antibiotic resistance. In experiments In vivo from the soil, were isolated 7 bacteria resistant to all tested antibiotics. They were representatives of aerobic microbiota: Bacillus licheniformis, Serratia fonticola, Hafnia alvei, Bacillus cereus, Pantoea agglomerans, Bacillus megaterium and anaerobic bacteria - Clostridium difficile. In natural conditions, from the soil of model ecosystems were isolated mostly bacteria of the genus Bacillus. All of them are antibiotic resistant and are the causative agents of foodborne infections and pose a threat not only to the environment, but also to human health.

Conclusion: Results of investigations have not only theoretical value, but practical as well. The presence of enrofloxacin in the soil, especially in high concentrations, cause negative changes in microbial community, reduces the respiratory activity of the soil and is one of important factors in the formation of soil resistome.

Oral Session 1:

  • Crop Protection and Entomology | Food & Nutrients | Soil & Water Management | Soil Geology & Remote Sensing
Speaker

Chair

Md Kawser Ali

University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Vaclav Nedbal photo

Vaclav Nedbal

University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic

Title: Analysis of nitrogen nutrient status of winter wheat using aerial hyperspectral data

Biography:

Vaclav Nedbal has completed his PhD from University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic. He is the researcher at University of South Bohemia, Faculty of Agriculture and closely collaborates with ENKI non-profit scientific organization, Trebon, Czech Republic. He has published 15 contributions in reputed journals and book chapters.

Abstract:

Knowledge of spatial distribution of nitrogen nutrient status of crops is very important for planning of its fertilization, mostly in system of precision agriculture. Aerial hyperspectral sensors can provide very detail information about spectral characteristics of crop which can be used for spatial analysis of nutrient status and physiological condition of crops. Spectral indices derived from spectral data are usually used for estimation of nutrient status. We analyzed relation between 16 spectral indices derived from hyperspectral data and field assessment of nutrient content in winter wheat biomass using Nitrogen Nutrient Index (NNI). The best result provided index REIP (Red Edge Inflection Point Index) with R2 = 0.66, however the correlation between REIP and NNI varies spatially and during the vegetation season. Important factor which might have essential impact on the correlation between spectral indices and nitrogen content in crop mass is spatial proportion of both crop and soil cover recorded by spectral sensor. This finding is important mostly on fields with high variability of soil environment and canopy cover. This work was supported by grant of Technological Agency of the Czech Republic TA CR Epsilon TH02030133.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Md Kawser Ali photo

Md Kawser Ali

University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh

Title: Effect of polythene color & types on the quality and shelf life of tomato at ambient condition

Biography:

Md. Kawser Ali has completed his PhD at the age of 40 from University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. He has been a Scientific Officer, Spices Research station at Magura, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute. He has published more than 28 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a Professor in the Department of Crop Science and Technology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. He is specialized on vegetable and spices research.  He has supervised more than 10 MS and 6 PhD students and at present 6 MS student, 5 PhD students are working under his supervision.

Abstract:

An experiment was conducted at Natore district in Bangladesh during from March to April 2013 to study the effect of polythene bags on shelf life of tomato. Significant variation was found due to the combined effects of different color and types of polythene bags at room temperature (25ËšC) in respect of time required for ripening of tomato and percent of weight loss. Control treatment gave the sign of full ripening after 9.67 days where as black sealed treatment took 12.00 days. Control treatment showed the highest weight loss (19.41%) where as it was the lowest (8.9%) in black sealed polythene. There were non-significant variations found in total soluble solids (TSS), acidity and pH. Significant variation among the treatments resulted from the combination of color and types of polythene in respect of moisture content, percent of dry matter and shelf life. The highest moisture content (94.13%) was recorded in black sealed polythene and the minimum moisture content (82.87%) in white and transparent with perforated polythene. White and non transparent polythene with sealed condition showed the highest dry matter content (17.13%) whereas the lowest dry matter was in black sealed (5.87%). The highest shelf life (28.89 days) was recorded in black perforated polythene and the lowest shelf life (14.33 days) in control.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Misbah Safdar photo

Misbah Safdar

University of Sydney, Australia

Title: Impacts of genome size and ploidy level on the morphological traits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench

Biography:

Misbah Safdar has completed her Masters of Honors in Agriculture at the age of 25 years from PMAS Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi and pursuing PhD at University of Sydney, Australia. She worked as Research Officer in Barani Agricultural Research Institute, Government of Punjab, Pakistan. She has published four papers in reputed journals and is in last semester of PhD.

 

Abstract:

Polyploidy has played a significant role in the evolution of vascular plants and about 80 % of angiosperms are estimated to be polyploid.  The knowledge of nuclear DNA content in plants (either in relative or absolute units) is used to estimate genome size and the ploidy level. Genome size (C-value or the haploid nuclear DNA content) is used to explain evolutionary patterns and adaptation mechanisms of plants. Genome size varies to about 2400 folds across the angiosperms. Flow cytometry (FCM) is commonly used to estimate genome size and ploidy level in plants. Okra Abelmoschus esculentus L. (Moench), is an economically important vegetable crop grown in tropical and sub-tropical as well as in the Mediterranean region. Ploidy level has been determined mostly by counting the chromosomes of stained root tips but studies on genome size of the genus Abelmoschus are rare. Due to smaller chromosome size, variable chromosome number and high ploidy levels existing within the species the visual counting is laborious and can potentially lead to errors. In this study FCM was used to determine absolute DNA content, genome size, relative chromosome number and ploidy level of 170 genotypes of okra by employing CyStain PI Absolute P kit and CyStain UV Precise P (DAPI) kit. CyStain UV Precise P (DAPI) proved to be a better choice for the determination of ploidy level and relative chromosome number. This was a base specific kit and data obtained showed low CV. Results indicated that relative number of chromosomes varied from 84-189 for Abelmoschus moschatus and 115–170 for Abelmoschus esculentus. Eight groups were formed based on basic set of chromosome i.e., x=12. The ploidy 2n for A. moschatus was 7x, 11x, 13x, 15x and 16x whereas for A. esculentus it ranged 10x–14x. The 2CDNA value for A. moschatus ranged from 2.42pg–6.90pg and genome size in Mbp ranged from 2362.92Mbp–6794.86Mbp. For A. esculentus 2CDNA value ranged from 2.34pg–4.13pg while genome size in Mbp ranged from 2292.31Mbp–4042.30 Mbp. The genome size data was found inadequate to accurately indicate the number of chromosomes and further studies were needed to optimize the protocol to determine the precise chromosome count using the genome size data. Negative correlation between relative ploidy and genome size showed a downsizing of the genome size with increased ploidy level. Correlations among traits showed that increased vegetative growth (more number of branches) reduced reproductive growth in okra under heat stress.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker M A Rahim photo

M A Rahim

Bangladesh Agricultural University, Bangladesh

Title: Quality and safety issues for horticulture produce in Bangladesh

Biography:

M A Rahim holds Ph.D. degree in Vegetables Physiology and Post-doctorate in vegetables breeding from University of London, UK and University of Wisconsin, USA, respectively. He is now the Advisor of Aquaculture-Horticulture Collaborative USAID program in Bangladesh. He is now the Director of HORTEX Foundation in Bangladesh- a government organization for Horticulture production and export. His expertise is in the area of improvement, irrigation water market, conservation of agriculture, food safety and nutritional security, and mechanization in postharvest managements, varietals development of nutrient rich high value fruits and vegetables. Now he is working at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA with the horticulture research team. Now he is working in the Feed the Future (FtF) working areas in Bangladesh in collaboration with AAS-World Fish, Blue Gold, Solidaridad, and Government organization. He is also working with University of Wisconsin for adopting the wild crops relatives in saline and drought areas of Bangladesh.

Abstract:

Fruits and vegetables are rich sources of vitamins, minerals, dietary fibers. Per capita consumption is still lower (212 g day-1) than desirable amount (400 g day-1). There exists food-phobia in the society. Consumption of fruits and vegetables has been dropped due to perceived health risks due to consumption of adulterated or unsafe foods. There are also reports of rejection of export consignments.  Postharvest loss is substantial. Assurance of quality and safety is a challenge in the context of nutrition security, public health and export. Presence of chemical residues in food is a major food safety concern. Food Safety Act 2013 and establishment of BFSA are noticeable steps to deal with this deep-rooted problem. Consumption of safe fruits and vegetables and expansion of export can only be achieved if quality and safety controls are in place.  Quality and safety issues in horticultural chains to be prioritized for domestic marketing and export. Postharvest loss is substantial. The present paper deals with the safe horticultural production, policy, post-harvest loss reduction and nutritional food security.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Johnson Benziwa Nathalie photo

Johnson Benziwa Nathalie

University of Lome, Togo

Title: Germination of Lawsonia inermis L. under different abiotic constraints Etude de la germination de Lawsonia inermis L. sous differentes contraintes abiotiques

Biography:

Johnson Benziwa Nathalie has completed her PhD at University of Lome, Togo. She has attended many conferences and she has published more than 10contributions in International reputed journals and books.

Abstract:

Henna (Lawsonia inermis L.) is one of the best known plants for its cosmetic, dyeing, ornamental and medicinal properties. It is grown in tropical and subtropical regions, particularly in countries such as Algeria, Egypt, India, Iran, Mali, Morocco, and Senegal. In main exporting regions of the Middle East, Asia and West Africa, the preferred method used for industrial plantations is seed sowing. However, several constraints have been reported as impediments to henna germination, thus limiting a large scale multiplication of the species. Those include the presence of a hard and resistant shell-seeds, low germination percentages that hardly reaching 20% and limited shelf life (<<90 days). In this study, seed multiplication improvement tests have therefore been carried out both en serre and in vitro. In the greenhouse, the effect of light has been tested both by light intensity (0-120 μE.m-².s-1) and by the duration of illumination (variable from 0h, 12h, 14h, 16h then continuously 24/24) as well as of pre- treatments (immersion in distilled water and mechanical scarification). Seed burial tests - from 0 to 30 mm deep with 5 mm increments -were also conducted and the conservation of germinability was studied. In vitro, introduction of local ecotypes was carried out. The results show the necessity of light for the germination of Lawsonia inermis's seeds, which reacts positively to an elongation of the photoperiod from 0% in continuous darkness to 89% for 12h of light and 94% for 16h of light, with a decrease in average germination time of around 36 hours. From 5 mm deep, burial in the substrate causes a drastic drop in germination percentage. The most interesting result of this study was the possibility of preserving henna seeds at an ambient temperature of 25 ± 2 ° C in darkness conditions, for almost 9 months in simple plastic boxes. The seeds used retain a germination capacity exceeding 93%. In vitro culture test, seeds showed more than 90% of germination and a regular growth of seedlings was obtained.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Jakub Brom  photo

Jakub Brom

University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic

Title: Assessment of infiltration zones by crop water stress derived from remotely sensed data

Biography:

Jakub Brom has completed his PhD at University of South Bohemia in ÄŒeské BudÄ›jovice, Czech Republic. He is the Associate Professor at University of South Bohemia, Faculty of Agriculture and closely collaborates with ENKI for non-profit organization TÅ™eboň, Czech Republic. He has published more than 40 contributions in reputed journals and book chapters.

Abstract:

Infiltration zones are defined as areas with high ability of water infiltration to the soil. These soils are usually shallow, with high proportion of sand and low proportion of organic matter and with low retention capacity. The knowledge of infiltration zones spatial distribution is crucial for purposes of fertilization of crops in system of precision farming, management of nutrients loss (mostly nitrates) from soil and for protection of surface waters. In principle, usage of crop water stress for identification of infiltration zones is based on faster drying out of these zones and thus faster crop water stress development than in other areas. We analyzed relation between some several soil types with different water regime with crop water stress index (CWSI) derived from aerial spectral and thermal data. Analysis was developed on example of winter wheat field with heterogenous soil characteristics in Czech Republic. Our results showed good agreement between CWSI and infiltration properties of analysed soils. High values of CWSI corresponding with soils with high ability for water infiltration (arenic cambisols). The difference of results between arenic cambisols and other soil types was statistically significant. This work was supported by grant of Technological Agency of the Czech Republic TA ÄŒR Epsilon TH02030133.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker M A Rahim photo

M A Rahim

Bangladesh Agricultural University, Bangladesh

Title: Role of tropical and subtropical fruits for crop diversification, biodiversity, environmental protection in changing climates, nutritional food security and poverty reduction in Bangladesh

Biography:

M A Rahim holds Ph.D. degree in Vegetables Physiology and Post-doctorate in vegetables breeding from University of London, UK and University of Wisconsin, USA, respectively. He is now the Advisor of Aquaculture-Horticulture Collaborative USAID program in Bangladesh. He is now the Director of HORTEX Foundation in Bangladesh- a government organization for Horticulture production and export. His expertise is in the area of improvement, irrigation water market, conservation of agriculture, food safety and nutritional security, and mechanization in postharvest managements, varietals development of nutrient rich high value fruits and vegetables. Now he is working at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA with the horticulture research team. Now he is working in the Feed the Future (FtF) working areas in Bangladesh in collaboration with AAS-World Fish, Blue Gold, Solidaridad, and Government organization. He is also working with University of Wisconsin for adopting the wild crops relatives in saline and drought areas of Bangladesh.

Abstract:

Bangladesh economy is predominantly dependent on agriculture. So, the importance of horticulture in the national economy has been well justified. The Horticultural crops, particularly fruits, vegetables and spices are  playing  a vital role in crop diversification, human nutrition, economy, environment,  with an ultimate goal of balanced diet, fight malnutrition, food self-sufficiency, biodiversity, environmental protection and poverty alleviation.  In Bangladesh around 40 million peoples are suffering from micronutrient deficiency-the hidden hunger. Moreover, almost 70% peoples are below the poverty level.  Our Government has paid much emphasis on rice but not on fruits, vegetable, spices and flowers production as our diet is rice based. Although there has been considerable success in variety development and technology generation in fruits and vegetables but their application are not adequate. Improved varieties of fruit like mango, guava, jackfruit, litchi, pineapple and banana   are available in Bangladesh. The paper deals with mainly achievements, constraints and opportunities of horticultural crops (fruits) in Bangladesh for plantations and climate change.  They are also contributing in nutrition and poverty alleviation of our land scarce, malnutrition affected and poor peoples. Bangladesh Agricultural University also established the largest fruit repository including a number of underutilized, tropical, subtropical, indigenous and temperate fruits here in Mymensingh. Contribution of the horticultural crops in the climate change, nutrition of poor people and to alleviate poverty in coastal (saline), hunger prone (monga) and flood affected areas also addressed. Plantation of underutilized fruit ber (Jujube) cv. BAU Kul 1 tremendously contributes in the poverty reduction and natural soil reclamation from saline to non-saline condition. Finally, the paper focuses on the future policy of the managements of horticultural crops in Bangladesh for economy, nutrition, food security, poverty alleviation and sustainable development.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Nav Raj Adhikari  photo

Nav Raj Adhikari

Tribhuvan University, Nepal

Title: Red light absorbance-transmittance, fluorescence and electron transport measures from PS II on the T4 and E1 and leaves of eight maize hybrids

Biography:

Nav Raj Adhikari is the Professor at Institute of Agriculture and Animal Science (IAAS), Tribhuvan University (TU), Nepal. He has worked on triticale genome engineering in his MS Thesis work from Tottori University, Japan in 1995. He completed his PhD in Plant Breeding from Tribhuvan University, Nepal in 2015. He worked in flowering and photosynthetic model formulation in maize in his PhD. He has been involved in teaching courses and undergraduate and graduate research students of plant breeding.

Abstract:

We examined red light absorbance-transmittance (RAT) and chlorophyll fluorescence (Fo, Fm, Fm-Fo), electron transport from PS II (Fv/Fm, Fv/Fo) of eight maize hybrids since the crop scientist’s curiosity. For it, we conducted an experiment of randomized complete block design of three replications planting seeds on Dec 1, 2017 at farmers’ field at Fulbari-Chitwan, Nepal. We took one hundred observations of RAT measures (using SPAD 502 plus, Spectrum, USA) from T4 leaf of each of the six randomly selected plants in 3 day period from 69th day during early vegetative stage and Fo, Fm, Fv (=Fm-Fo), Fv/Fm and Fv/Fo from the E1 leaf from the same plants in each of twenty four plots from 141 to 148th day during late grain filling (using chlorophyll fluorometer (OS30p+, Opti-Sciences, USA). After analysis of the frequency distributions of the measures and their mean comparisons, we found no significant difference among the single reading, three and 100 readings averages of the measures. Besides, we can conclude that a single reading from sample plants from the T4 and E1 leaves of six plants in each plot is enough to examine the traits from the equipments, but we must eliminate outliers while taking observations from the equipments if we are just examining averages of maize crop genotypes in the respective T4 and E1 leaf. We could not find special peculiarities in the frequency distribution of the variety of the measures for high grain yielding hybrids although we found different types of frequency distribution pattern for different hybrids based on skewness and kurtosis. Three significantly differing highest grain yielding hybrids are Bioseed, Gangakaveri, and Shresta and their corresponding grain yields are 16, 14 and 12 t ha-1

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Sidhartha Kar  photo

Sidhartha Kar

Krishi Vigyan Kendra, India

Title: Precious supply chain management of onion (Allium cepa L) by examining the production, quality expansion & market analysis for food safety

Biography:

Siddhartha Kar has completed his PhD from university of Krishi Vigyan Kendra, India. He has published published more than 10 papers in reputed journals. He also attended for so many conferences and received so many certifications.

Abstract:

Onion is the nearly everyone important and indispensable vegetable in kitchen as condiment and vegetable which captured an extensive internal market. The green leaves, matured and immature bulbs are eaten raw or used in preparation of vegetables. It is used as salad and cooked in various ways, in all curries fries boiled or baked. It is also used in processed form e.g. flakes, powder, paste, pickles and some seasoning foods. It is valued much on account of its characteristics pungency which is due to presence of sulphur compound (Ally propyl disulphide). It possesses some important medicinal properties.The organic onion is flourishing mainly due to consumer choice. The organic onion is much preferred than traditionally grown. It makes an increase in varieties and selection of onion in retail, supermarket and restaurant. The market plays an important role in determining the pattern as well as the pace of diversification in favor of high-value crops like onion. An increase in production is of little value unless there is a good marketing system. Keeping the above view a research analysis on “Precious supply chain management of onion (Allium cepa l) by examining the production, quality expansion & market analysis for food safety” was carried out and found among two zones selected such as eastern coastal plateau zone & mid central table land zone, Mid central table land zone found most suitable for onion farming and fulfilling all most all farming requirements. Effect of organic nutrient and botanical pesticides on onion applied, the best onion varieties response to vermi compost (50%) that is 2 t/ha + NPK (50:50:50) 50 Kg each / ha was remarkable and best organic treatment. Effect of cultivation of different onion varieties found best results with onion variety Agri found Dark Red which has got best results in concern to growth & yield of onion. Effect of integrated weed management on weed density, Dry matter weight of weeds & weed control efficiency found best results with weed control treatment one hand weeding at 20 Days After Transplanting + Ridge & furrow making (6” X 6”) length X breadth in onion variety N-53. Experimental State found best in progress with onion infrastructure development for processing of onion, onion storage structures & market development in last three year is concern it is utmost in concern with the agro ecological situations. Experimental Country was found best in fulfilling the annual production & demand of onion, onion cultivation area, production & export of onion by excellent in designing of description about grading, standardization parameters & bulb produced in experimental field as well as in different agro climatic situations are found best to face the global requirements. Market survey found best results with variation within experimental period of time analysis found Bhubaneswar has lowest variations of onion price from wholesale to retail sell price. And also experimental State have best control over onion price hike during the market research & experiment year that is survey results from year 2013 – 2017.  Supply chain management models analyses it is concluded that onion SCM developed after survey that is a new model from research to different marketing channel partner involvement and then grass root label point coverage’s prepared and samples are tested in field found best results. E- Onion marketing & digitalization found a new & best technology to reduce marketing costs and examined during experiment founds best response among primary, secondary & tertiary stock holders. Among different onion farming treatments integrated organic onion production technology found best economic results in comparison to conventional onion farming technology that is C:B = 1.97 (Cost Benefit ratio) & net returns are best with organic onion production technology that is Rs. 1,95,802/- (Rs/ha). Price transmission mechanism is concerned from farmer’s field to consumer points costs is concern the best minimum price transmission is found during Season I during February to July average Rs. 19.25 (Rs/q) in comparison to season II (August to January).