Agenda

Date

September 16-17, 2019

Location

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Conference Agenda

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Keynote Session:

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Ehud Spanier photo

Ehud Spanier

University of Haifa, Israel

Title:  Marine spatial planning for the Mediterranean coast of Israel – Confl icts of interest and possible solutions

Biography:

Ehud Spanier is a full professor (Emeritus) at the graduate Department of Mari me Civiliza ons and The Leon Recana  Institute for Maritime Studies, The Leon H. Charney School for Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, Israel. 

Abstract:

The Levant basin in the southeastern Mediterranean has a very dynamic marine ecosystem. Although it is characterized by poor productivity, this sensitive ecosystem is also typified by high biodiversity and unique habitats. Sea water warming and extreme species invasion, mainly via the Suez Canal ("Lessepsian migration") make this ecosystem very dynamic. Man-made intense activities, including overfishing, accelerated coastal development (e.g., ports constructions, desalination and power plants, pollution, mariculture, shipping), natural gas exploration, utilization and transport in the deeper part of the inshore water caused considerable changes and threaten this fragile ecosystem.  In order to enhance ecosystem-based management of this complex environment, we identified the many stakeholders (coastal and off shore), and spatial and temporal conflicts between them and with the natural environment. Possible opportunities were recognized, such as enabling the use of the same marine space for several stakeholders while preserving the natural environment. E.g., marine areas that are closed to the public for security and operational reasons (naval bases, coastal portions of power and desalination plants) can be used as de-facto MPAs (Marine Protected Areas) and be added to natural marine reserves. Our study indicates that number of fish and macro-invertebrates species, biomass, and diversity index were always higher in such MPAs compare to control areas. Groupers, fishes of high commercial value, some of which are on the IUCN Red List of threatened species, were significantly more common and larger in this MPA. These no-fishing zones also protect the Mediterranean slipper lobster, another threatened species, and could serve also as a sanctuary for reproductive populations of these overfished species. We also recommend limiting fisheries, especially bottom trawling, in space, time and equipment and completely prohibit fishing during the recruitment season of the indigenous species (which is usually different from that of invading species). Expanding marine reserves to include various habitats, depths and bio-communities, with adequate critical mass of key species and connectivity with other reserves and considerable buffer zones between them and development activities will ensure the continuous of the ecosystem services of this environment. Yet the basis for a proper ecosystem-based management and planning is sufficient environmental and ecological knowledge of the habitat.  However this knowledge in the Levant Basin is only partial especially in the deep and open sea. It is often derived manly from the developers. For designing an objective marine spatial planning, there is a need for scientific and environmental marine data from independent sources. 

 

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Giovanna Bucci photo

Giovanna Bucci

University of Padova, Italy

Title: Coastal zone culture: Towards an hermeneutic of waterscape archaeology

Biography:

Giovanna Bucci, PhD Archaeologist, Adjunct Professor of Christian Archaeology and Responsible of Underwater Archaeology Laboratory at Cultural Heritage Department, University of Padova, Italy. National Coordinator of Scientific Research and Underwater Archaeology at Federation ITA F07 A.CDCI. CMAS Diving Center Italia, Bologna - Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques. Member of UNESCO Roster of Experts active in protecting Syrian cultural heritage, within the framework of the Emergency Safeguarding of the Syrian Cultural Heritage. 146 archaeological fields (on land and underwater); author of 74 scientific publications. Research key words: Archaeology, underwater cultural heritage, surveillance archaeology, Mediterranean Sea, Late roman Architecture, Syria, mosaics. 

Abstract:

Coastal zone is the Earth sector which involves Waterscape Archaeology, recent branch of Archaeological studies which provide a new approach to the environment with a total comprehension of the context. Environments consists of natural landscapes and cultural landscapes, altered in some manner by people. Among archaeologists, the term landscape can refer to the meanings and alterations people mark onto their surroundings: landscape archaeology is often employed to study the human use of land over extensive periods of time, waterscape archaeology is a multidisciplinary science devoted to the study of human use of wet lands, coastal zones, anthropological connection with the water environment: the study of the ways in which people in the past constructed and used the water environment around them. A new approach of scientific synergy with geomorphological analysis, biology and water environmental conditions studies associated to archaeology, history, ancient sources (texts, inscriptions, cartography), data coming from aerial and satellite photos has been great to map the sites and promote new strategies of use and conservation. RWT Researching While Training method following the international CMAS standards and UNESCO legislation has brought excellent results. In this cultural ambit we developed a pilote Research / Didactic Project called WAS Waterscape Archaeology in Sicily at Isola delle Femmine, Palermo, Italy, under the patronage of Soprintendenza del Mare, Regione Siciliana, Assessorato Beni culturali e Identità siciliana, Dipartimento dei Beni culturali e Identità siciliana, Dept. of Cultural Heritage, University of Padova with its Underwater Archaeology Laboratory. The project concerns researches, studies, protection, conservation, tutela of the coastal cultural heritage, with an ecosustainable approach, best practice for scientific diving, beginning from total respect of nature across a deep knowledge of the context and of the site. The campaigns completed between 2016 and 2018 has been very successful. More than 30 points of cultural interest attested, a new proposal for responsible tourism and conservation for protected marine areas. The Project, through the organization of 3 European events, is recognized by European Commission Environment and Energy European Commission as Partner for Satellite Event of EU Green Week and Energy Week. In this conference we would like to introduce our unpublished work, bringing an example of collaboration between different disciplines to safeguard and promote the coast as cultural resource. 

Oral Session 1:

  • Coastal Zone Management | Coastal Archaeology | Coastal Processes | Coastal Ecology
Speaker

Chair

Dr. Ehud Spanier

University of Haifa, Israel

Speaker

Co-Chair

Giovanna Bucci

University of Padova, Italy

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Robyn E Jones photo

Robyn E Jones

Swansea University, United Kingdom

Title:  Improving visual biodiversity assessments of motile fauna in turbid aquatic environments

Biography:

Robyn E Jones is a marine researcher with a background in marine consultancy and off shore surveying with interests in marine ecology and engineering. she is currently working towards a PhD which focuses on ‘Remote methods for the assessment of coastal biodiversity interac ng with marine renewable developments’ alongside Ocean Ecology Limited and Swansea University.

Abstract:

Current knowledge of turbid coastlines relies heavily on extractive sampling methods with less destructive visual techniques limited primarily by underwater visibility.  Such coastlines are present around Wales, especially dynamic locations targeted for Marine Renewable Energy developments.  Baited Remote Underwater Video (BRUV) is now a commonly used non-extractive sampling technique which involves the use of bait to attract motile fauna to the field of view of the camera, but its use is still restricted to clear water environments.  Here we describe and test the addition of a clear liquid optical chamber (CLOC) to a BRUV system to improve underwater visibility when observing motile fauna in turbid waters.
The CLOC method was trialled with respect to the ability of the system to identify taxa to species level in both controlled laboratory and field conditions across gradients of underwater visibility.  This study found that the introduction of a CLOC to a conventional BRUV system significantly improved the ability to observe identifying features of four fish species in a controlled low visibility environment.  The ability to identify taxa to species level in field conditions was also significantly increased with the addition of a CLOC.  
We conclude that the introduction of a CLOC to a conventional BRUV system is a reliable way of improving underwater visibility when assessing motile fauna allowing for a more consistent identification of taxa to species level.  This system may be applied to both marine and freshwater aquatic environments.

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Frida Occelli and Simon Luca Trigona photo

Frida Occelli and Simon Luca Trigona

Studium S.A.S, Italy Superintendence for Archeology, Italy

Title:  Portus Vadorum: New data after recent dredging

Biography:

Frida Occelli has been working as a fi eld archaeologist since 1993. She has directed hundreds of pres gious archaeological underwater and inland excava ons. As archaeologist, she is involved in many infrastructural projects, such as the high speed train connec ng Turin and Lyon or the underground lines 1 and 2 of Turin.

Simon Luca Trigona is a state offi  cial of the Soprintendenza Archaeological, in charge of underwater archaeology in Liguria (North Italy). 

Abstract:

The occupation of the natural harbor of Vado Ligure since the Republican age was already known during the last century. 
The preventive archaeology work and assistance carried out between 2014 and 2018 in the natural harbour of Vado Ligure, Liguria, Italy, for the realisation of a large multipurpose port platform has brought to the acquisition of an enormous mass of finds datable between the Roman and Modern age. The different investigative methodologies have allowed the acquisition of complex information which rendered necessary, in addition to the classification of finds, a functional data management system which could contextually meet the study, conservation and enhancement needs.
For the realization of the systematization activities of the archeological data acquired and the filing of materials a computer information system was planned which would link the information contained in the relational finds database with geo-stratigraphic GIS information; the result of the interaction of these two data management systems enables us to manage and organize information from several points of view for analytical needs (qualitative, distributive, geographic).

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Rosana Beatriz Silveira photo

Rosana Beatriz Silveira

Hippocampus Institute, Brazil

Title:  Occurrence and distribution of seahorses (Syngnathidae) inside and outside of Brazilian Protected Areas: Effectiveness of conservation actions

Biography:

Rosana B. Silveira is the principal researcher of the Hippocampus Ins tute, which develops the Hippocampus Project  (Biology, cul va on and conserva on of seahorses). She has experience in biology for conserva on of species, ac ng mainly on the following topics: Syngnathidae, threatened and over-exploited species, conserva on and management, development, breeding in cap vity, environmental educa on and public policies. 

Abstract:

Seahorses are globally threatened. In Brazil there are three species: Hippocampus reidi, Hippocampus patagonicus and Hippocampus erectus. The Brazilian Ministry of the Environment  classifies them as vulnerable, being protected by PAN Corais (National Action Plan for the Conservation of Coral Environments). Using snorkeling diving activities, inventory and monitoring of seahorses were developed to mapping the occurrence of species and its habitats during last 17 years. Seahorses occurred from north to south of Brazil, inhabiting mangroves, estuaries, bays, environments of continental rocky coastlands, continental and oceanic islands. Hippocampus reidi had this same general occurrence with marked distribution from the northeast (Maranhão) to the south (Santa Catarina) region; H. erectus had the same occurrence as H. reidi with a marked distribution from the northeast (Rio Grande do Norte) to the southeast (São Paulo) region. Hippocampus patagonicus was widely distributed between the southeast (Rio de Janeiro) and the southern (Rio Grande do Sul) region. Although Brazil has 257 marine and coastal Protected Areas (PAs), the map of distribution of seahorses shows that the PAs does not ensure the conservation of the species, mainly of H. patagonicus, whose populations are concentrated outside the PAs. Hippocampus reidi is present in marine PAs, and H. erectus needs further studies, including mapping.Our results indicate the need to evaluate public environmental policies in Brazil and suggest that H. reidi should be included in the PAN Manguezal (National Action Plan for the Conservation of Mangrove Environments), as we do not yet know if the marine populations are genetically the same to those of the mangroves. In the case of H. erectus its search in natural environments is needed, and for H. patagonicus, a conservation proposal in the light of new evidence of its restricted distribution is necessary.

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Claudia Scianna photo

Claudia Scianna

University Cote d Azur, Italy

Title: Organization science improves management effectiveness of marine protected areas

Biography:

Claudia Scianna, together with the co-authors, has developed the idea to apply the Organizational Science to the Marine Protected Area during her PhD. The approach and the methodology are based on several years of experience in the field of marine protected areas of some of the authors, as well as on several years of experience in the field of others. The main idea is that marine protected areas are organizations too and they need to be evaluate also as a business company in order to succeed. This has determined, for example, a new definition of size, the organizational size, in the MPAs field. Also the research has brought to the creation of a framework, easy to follow by MPAs managers in order to improve MPAs effectiveness.

Abstract:

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are important tools to achieve ecological, cultural and socio-economic goals. MPAs Ecological Management Effectiveness (EME) is the degree to which MPAs reach their ecological goals. The significant variability of EME among MPAs has been extensively studied and partly explained by several MPA features linked to design, management and implementation (e.g. surface area, enforcement, age of protection). We investigated EME variability by employing, for the first time, Organization Science, the discipline that studies organizations. Using an exploratory multiple case study approach, we applied OS principles to eleven Mediterranean MPAs in order to characterize several organizational features. Among those eleven, eight MPAs were taken into account to explore the relationships between EME and MPA features, such as: 1) organizational size (i.e. the ratio between the number of full-time employees and the total MPA surface area), 2) management performance (i.e. the level of effort exerted to enhance and sustain the MPA management, including enforcement), 3) total surface area, and 4) MPA age. The logresponse ratios of fish biomass in protected vs unprotected (control) areas was used as a proxy of EME. Results show that a number of organizational features are highly variable among the MPAs we studied. Management performance, organizational size and, to a lesser extent, MPA age were positively correlated with the log-response ratio of fish biomass, whereas total surface area did not display a significant role. Based on our findings, two relevant outcomes emerge from this exploratory study: i) the management performance of the MPAs considered needs extensive improvements; ii) the employment of Organization Science in the management effectiveness assessment made possible the elaboration of a framework (see image) that can assist MPA managers to reach goals more effectively, with a more efficient use of available resources. 

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Maryam Cheraghian photo

Maryam Cheraghian

University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Iran

Title:  A scrutinized estimation of longshore sediment transport rate along the northern coastline of the Oman sea

Biography:

Maryam Cheraghian is a Ph.D. candidate in civil engineering - hydraulic structures, at University of Sistan and Baluchestan. Her main fi eld of interest is in coastal engineering and sediment transport. She is familiar with sedimentology and GIS-related skills and her PhD disserta on focus is on es ma ng LST rate over the northern coastline of the Oman Sea. Her background is in civil engineering – hydraulic structures (MSc, 2014) from University of Sistan and Baluchestan and in civil engineering (BSc, 2011) from University of Tabriz.

Abstract:

Estimations of sediment transport rate is the prerequisite of coastal development and management studies, as accretion and erosion are among main controlling considerations for port planning (Nam et al., 2009). The Iranian coastline of the Oman Sea, which is so - called Makran Coastline, has a complex morpho-dynamic behavior and should be considered from both scientific importance and its high potential for development in the next decade. It is while morpho-dynamic perspective of the area is not well studied so far (Dibajnia et al., 2016). On the other hand, the wave climate of the area is affected by different regimes: monsoon waves, normal seas, swells coming from the Indian Ocean and tropical cyclones. There are limited researches on the contribution of each regime on the longshore sediment transport with considering the sensitivity to deep water wave direction variability (Jedari Attari et al., 2018). This study aims to put different pieces of knowledge together, including field measurements, numerical modeling and GIS-based analysis of multi-year cross-shore profile data, to obtain a more realistic estimation of LST rate along the un-developed Makran Coastline. The focus of this paper is mostly on the accurate wave and sediment transport modeling, verified against available field data and morphological evidences. A numerical model is applied for simulating the transportation process of sediments along Makran Coastline. The existing extracted shoreline changes around Makran Coastline through GIS analysis of satellite images were used to assess the general morphological changes in the study area. All the simulation and coastline change analysis results are adopted for obtaining an integrated conclusion in Zarabad Port as the case study of this research. The obtained results were in fair agreement with observations and this is why the model setup and study methodology can be applied for LST rate estimations over Makran Coastline.
 

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Deb Raha photo

Deb Raha

University of Derby, UK

Title:  Coastal resource mismanagement: People, land and sea, interconnectedness of coastal management for a fi shing community in Ghana

Biography:

Deb Raha is a lecturer in Human and Developmental Geography at the School of Environmental Sciences. Her research expertise and interest lie in critically analysing impact of physical geography issues on people’s lives such as climate change, sustainable ci es, food security and renewable energy. She is current working in a mul disciplinary team studying the impact of sea level rise on coastal community in Ghana. The research is so-far emphasising the interconnectedness of social, economic, cultural, political and environmental factors that affect rural coastal livelihoods and wellbeing. 

Abstract:

Coastal communities across the world are faced with the projected climate change stressors such as sea level rise. This is further challenging when global south rural coastal communities are also faced with interconnected physical, environmental, social, political and economic concerns. These fishing communities will not only be affected by sea level rise in the future, but at present are dealing with developmental issues related to livelihood, water, sanitation and waste. Local resource management and usage along with livelihood diversification strategies are the main developmental problems for these fishing communities. The research objective uses multidisciplinary lens through qualitative and quantitative methods to critically analyse Munni Lagoon in Winneba, Ghana, West Africa. The research context has a protective recognition of Ramsar designation for wetland and biodiversity management, however, implementation of this well-intentioned policy indicates a gap. The mangroves in the lagoon would enable to reduce flooding, maintain water quality in the lagoon and also in the future protect shoreline erosion. However, there has been mangrove depletion due to the over usage as fuel wood for cooking and smoking fish. Findings from this multidisciplinary data collected between 2014 to 2019 indicate that while people acknowledge the climate change threat, the community are prioritising livelihood strategies and diversification in the short term. Number of factors such as precipitation, over-exploitation of fishing zones and market saturation are affecting this predominantly fishing community that undertake drag-net fishing. Thus, community exposure to sea level rise appears to be secondary to adaptive strategies of improved income generation. Potential solutions such as biogas toilets at the household level can reduce overdependence on unsustainable use of cooking fuel improving indoor air quality, sanitation and waste management at the village level. Finally highlighting the participatory nature of coastal management, creating an integrated approach to prioritise resource protection and management through an interlinkage of ecosystems services, social, economic and environmental perspective to reduce coastal vulnerabilities to climate change.

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Sudarsha de Silve photo

Sudarsha de Silve

EarthLanka, Sri Lanka

Title:  Multi disciplinary approach on DPSWR on coastal & marine resources of Sri Lanka

Biography:

Sudarsha De Silva is a well known science and environment reporter from Sri Lanka. He was recognized as the best environment reporter in Sri Lanka by the Ministry of Environment 2009. He is the head and Chief Editor of Earth-Lanka News Network the only online media in Sri Lanka for science and environment reporting. 

Abstract:

The growing human and environmental pressures in coastal areas have significant impact on marine living and non- living resources, especially developing island like Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka has a maritime areas of 230,000 km2 belonging to country’s about three times larger than the land area. Ocean resources of Sri Lanka fall within the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem, which has been considered as one of the most productive ecosystem in the world oceans that consist of living and non-living resources including energy resources. But, Country under the pressure on marine litter and micro plastic pollution has been growing over the past few decades at an unprecedented rate putting coastal and ocean resources at a great risk. Such as, marine habitats, species, mammals, turtles and birds from beaches to deep sea water. Therefore, country need to focus on holistic approach to marine environmental management which considers the environmental, societal and economic impacts of all activities. In order to, this article used DPSWR (Drives – Pressure – State – Welfare - Response) analytical framework to understand the problems and identify measures to manage these problems. The Driving forces are the activities and social factor of marine litter and micro plastic pollution activities, directly or / and indirectly put Pressure on the marine environment in various ways. The pressure change or have an impacts on the State of the environment, which subsequently change or impact the ecosystem goods and services provided and the human welfare (Welfare)  attributable to a change in state. Those then required Responses (as measures and incentives i.e. Policy Instruments) to reduce at least one impact of change in state or welfare. Sri Lanka plays a key point when considering maritime boundary with neighbor countries. The methodology will be a macro analysis on the key aspects of mainstreaming coastal and marine resources of Sri Lanka, integrating the three dimensions of sustainable development. Environmental, social and economic, policy and institutional coherence, financing the sustainable development agenda and data readiness for monitoring and evaluation. 

Oral Session 2:

  • Poster Sessions
Speaker

Chair

Ehud Spanier

University of Haifa, Israel

Speaker

Co-Chair

Robyn E Jones

Swansea University, United Kingdom

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Idania Briceno photo

Idania Briceno

Universidad Mayor, Chile

Title:  Intra-annual coastal dynamics through remote sensors and photogrammetry morph sedimentary patterns, Renaca beach, Central Chile

Biography:

Idania Briceno is a geographer graduated from Los Andes University, Merida, Venezuela, with 19 years of experience. She is pursuing a master of science degree in spa al analysis and territory management at the Central University of Venezuela (thesis in progress), Master degree in remote sensing. 

Abstract:

The Renaca Beach, located in the Valparaíso Region, Central Chile, is a place of special interest to understand the influence of oceanic, atmospheric and anthropic agents in the coastal dynamics. This study aims to determine the evolution of the coastal area, with survey studies were carried out with a differential GPS according to the revisit dates of the Landsat 8 satellite and photogrammetry to obtain accurate information of beaches and characterize evolutionary trends along the coast of Chile. In addition, the shoreline was automatically extracted with SHOREX, using images captured from the same satellite, considering data from January 2016 to December 2018. Sedimentological analyzes with transversal beach profiles were also carried out. Samples for season’s summer were collected in the profile. These samples were sieved and granulometric curves were constructed. In addition, oceanographic data for tide and wave height were compiled for the Landsat 8 satellite revisit dates. Also, a high-definition digital elevation model was generated from images captured by DRONE. The preliminary results show that the coastline advances landwards in winter and seawards in summer. The shoreline extracted with SHOREX provides a quantitative description of the short-term change (measured in three years), and the seasonal change in the coastline. In addition, sediment transport is dominated by saltation at the beginning of summer, while the dominant transport is saltation and suspension at the beginning of autumn. The variability will depend on the intensity of the dynamic agents that are present, be it wind, waves, tides, and the recurrence of extreme weather events such as storms. Continuous monitoring is vital for coastal use policy generation, as well as for the local management of coastal resources. 

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Rosa-Maria Canedo photo

Rosa-Maria Canedo

UNMSM, Peru

Title:  Moving forward to a multi-scale approach to improve the management and conservation of Peruvian MPAs: Using EUNIS habitat classifi cation in the study of RNIIPG-“Islands Fishermen Group”

Biography:

Rosa Maria is a young marine scien st from Peru. Currently,  a student in the Interna onal Master of Science in Marine Biological Resources (IMBRSea) and member of the Laboratory of Aqua c Ecology in the University of San Marcos where she co-leads a research program (DivEPerSea) to study the biodiversity and ecology in Peruvian marine ecosystems. She is par cularly interested in icthyology, marine conserva on and fi sheries but also determined to resolve today’s challenges in the marine realm. 

Abstract:

In Peru, there are three Protected Natural Areas (PNA) that include a marine component. One of this PNA is Reserva Nacional Sistema de Islas, Islotes y Puntas Guaneras (RNSIIPG) comprising of 33 subareas (islands, islets and rocky ledges). However, even when the main component (90%) is comprised of the marine area, there are just a few studies about it and an incipient eff ort to manage it. From its crea on to the present, the approaches used to manage the biodiversity and marine resources have been focused on target species and communi es and other important habitats that host valuable resources (e.g. razor clams, clams, crabs, sea cucumbers) have been ignored due to the gap of knowledge and wrong spa al representa on. In this study, we applied the European nature informa on system (EUNIS) habitat classifi ca on for the fi rst  me in the RNSIIPG and we took as a case study one of the subareas: Islands 
Fishermen Group located on the central coast of Peru and part of the Humboldt Current Ecosystem. We could iden fy 11 types of habitats, 2 habitats types at Level 2 and 9 habitats at Level 4.  In the case of habitats with mobile sediment, we could reach the Level 4 with bathymetric data and type of sediment (i.e. fi nd sand). Nerveless, we couldn’t reach the Level 5 due to the lack of informa on regarding the biological component. In the case of no-mobile sediment (i.e. hard substrates) we could only reach the Level 2 due to the lack of informa on of exposure degree and energy level the habitats are subjected. The applica on of EUNIS classifi ca on allows us to have an improved spa al overview of marine habitats in RNSIIPG. This is an evidence of the poten al use this tool can provide in Peruvian PNA to defi ne conserva on elements with a hierarchical approach.

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Tariq Alrushaid photo

Tariq Alrushaid

Kuwait University, Kuwait

Title:  Field measurements of near shore currents, waves, and sediment dynamics on a microtidal beach during fl uctuating onshore and offshore winds

Biography:

Tariq has completed his PhD at the age of 32 years from Texas A&M University. He is an assistance professor at Kuwait university Marine science department. He has a several experience in field deployment focusing on surf zone processes and nearshore dynamics.

Abstract:

Coastal zones around the Gulf of Mexico are very dynamic, due to prevailing energetic wind systems such as tropical storms during summer, and frequent cold fronts during winter. Detailed field measurements are needed to better understand: (1) the effects of cold fronts on nearshore current circulation, waves, sediment transport, and morphodynamics; (2) the effects of the interplay between onshore- and offshore-directed wind patterns on nearshore dynamics. This work synthesizes in-situ observations of nearshore hydrodynamics, atmospheric parameters, and sediment dynamics along a natural beach on the west side of Galveston Island (Texas, USA). The goal is to better understand the complex coupling effects between wind-driven waves, nearshore current circulation, and resulting sediment transport responsible for continuously reshaping coastal morphology. From November 16 to December 1 2016 instruments were deployed capturing three cold fronts (offshore-directed) with varying wind speed (4 - 7 m/s) and three strong southerly (onshore-directed) wind events (5 - 8 m/s). Flow velocities and water surface elevations were measured at five cross-shore locations covering the region from the inner surf zone to the inner shelf using two acoustic Doppler velocimeters and three profilers. Initial results suggest that southerly winds are associated with onshore and eastward currents (0.6 and 0.5 m/s, respectively), while cold fronts are associated with offshore and westward currents (0.7 and 0.3 m/s, respectively). Higher values of suspended sediment concentration were found at the beginning of the surf zone (4 - 6 gl), while lower values were present at the inner surf (2 - 4 gl).

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Ilja Voorsmit photo

Ilja Voorsmit

IMBRsea, Netherlands

Title: Short term attraction of fi sh to newly restored coral reef areas around Cerf Island, Seychelles

Biography:

Ilja Voorsmit is a starting marine scientist with a passion for coral reefs and their associated biota. Recently graduated (while writing not officially graduated yet) from the International Master In Marine Biological Resources (IMBRsea), this research represents the thesis with which he obtained his Master Degree.

 

Abstract:

While coral reefs are threatened by a multitude of factors such as sea surface temperature rise, overexploitation and ocean acidification, they are home to a third of marine life discovered so far. The threats are thus not only directly affecting the scleractinian coral themselves but also the associated marine life. Reef-associated fish assemblages were monitored around Cerf Island, Seychelles for six weeks during February and March 2019. Afterward, coral transplantation was performed, restoring 125m2 of degraded reef with a density of 4 coral fragments/m2. Once the transplantation was finished a week was given for the corals to adapt to their new environment. Then in April 2019, four weeks of monitoring was done to collect data on the fish assemblages after transplantation. Here we show that coral transplantation does not have an immediate effect on the fish assemblages in the area. We suggest that monitoring should continue for longer periods of time and that transplantation should be extended over a larger surface area as well as a different period in the year when surface temperatures are not likely to exceed 30°C.

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Alessia Monticone photo

Alessia Monticone

University of Sassari, Italy

Title:  Archeological and cultural tourism in relation with underwater archeological sites protection: The Olbia Gulf case study

Biography:

Graduate in Scienze dei Beni Culturali indirizzo Archeologico (3Y, Faculty of Literature & Philosophy-Conservation of Cultural Assets, Archaeology, University of Turin) Master Degree in Underwater Archaeology, (2Y,  University of Pisa, Faculty of Literature & Philosophy, Dept. od Archaology) Post Graduate in Coastal and Underwater Archaeology (Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia), University of Sassari Alessia also got a deep training and education in Archeological Underwater Intervention accomplishing the OTS training (Surface Supplied Inshore Air Diver by the International Diving School Association), got the DiveMaster certification by CMAS and got training in Scientific Diving by the International School for Scientific Divers. After a cooperation with CASC (Centro de Arqueologìa Subacuea Català) in 2013 entered in the Ministero dei Beni Culturali e Turismo working in the Museo Archeologico di Torino, now become Musei Reali Torino and went on studying the Gulf of Olbia underwater heritage.

Abstract:

Many are the projects to enhance Underwater Archeological Heritage, from wrecks to villas to port structures. Coastal Management is a subject itself which every day more involves archaeological studies in long term territorial planning (Daire 2014).  In the Olbia Gulf a technical preliminary study for an Underwater Archaological Park was done in the 90’ by the Soprintendenza (SABAP SS NU OT Archive) when also the underwater park of Ustica was born (Purpura 1992) but then the park was never realized because of protection issues. In 2001 the Tavolara Punta Coda Cavallo Marine Protected Area (then cited as AMP Tavolara PCC) was established, then endowed with a management plan and a regulation by 2007 but the archaeological enhancement of the many underwater sites preserved (which notice was given in the national Bollettino di Archeologia: D’Oriano-Riccardi 1990-1991-1993-1997) is still not possible because of the not yet exceeded protection requirements.  The study presented in this poster was lead during a University course of Marketing and Management of Cultural Heritage, and is centered to focus the statement of the problem in 2018 through stakeholders perception of underwater archeological heritage in the AMP Tavolara PCC and its value also for tourism. Stakeholders are individuated following the indication in the Management Plan of the AMP as published in Del Principe-Nicolini 2008, and the questions of the survey administrated to them follow the Mires 2014 phd doctoral study, the UNWTO 2018 and Gray 1985.  A conclusive reflection is given confuting Hannahs (2003) following statement: ‘If the best use of a resource is to be made through public access and not through an archaeological recovery of information, should archaeologists be taking the lead in managing these resources? If the value o f a cultural resource resides in its archaeological potential, then increasing the stress on that resource by encouraging public visitation is a bad idea. If the value of a cultural resource is not primarily archaeological, why are archaeologists taking the lead role in management decisions concerning them?’

Oral Session 3:

  • Workshop
Speaker

Chair

Giovanna Bucci

University of Padova, Italy

Meetings International - Coastal Zone 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Giovanna Bucci photo

Giovanna Bucci

University of Padova, Italy

Title: Coastal archaeology workshop

Biography:

Giovanna Bucci, PhD Archaeologist, Adjunct Professor of Christian Archaeology and Responsible of Underwater Archaeology Laboratory at Cultural Heritage Department, University of Padova, Italy. National Coordinator of Scientific Research and Underwater Archaeology at Federation ITA F07 A.CDCI. CMAS Diving Center Italia, Bologna - Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques. Member of UNESCO Roster of Experts active in protecting Syrian cultural heritage, within the framework of the Emergency Safeguarding of the Syrian Cultural Heritage. 146 archaeological fields (on land and underwater); author of 74 scientific publications. Research key words: Archaeology, underwater cultural heritage, surveillance archaeology, Mediterranean Sea, Late roman Architecture, Syria, mosaics. 

Abstract:

Coastal ecosystem includes also archaeological sites: settlements, houses, ports, sanctuaries as well as wrecks. Artificial elements that has modified landscape and waterscape. The interdisciplinary platform created for Coastal Zone Conference is a great chance to create a workshop to discuss actual approach to coastal zone archaeological research.  
Topics:
1. Coastal archaeological sites: environment, history, settlements and findings 2. Shallow water coastal archaeological surveys and near shore wrecks 3. Methodology of the research (direct surveys, remote sensing, etc.) 
4. Conservation of the coastal archaeological sites 
5. Archaeological tourism, coastal and underwater itineraries