Agenda

Schedule

Full-day Events with Awesome Speakers

Monday, April 15

09:30-10:05
Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Ricardo B. Maccioni photo

Ricardo B. Maccioni

University of Chile
Chile

Title

The Neuroimmunomodulation theory in Alzheimers disease

Biography

Dr. Maccioni is Professor of Neurology and Neurosciences, University of Chile, Director of the Laboratory of Neurosciences and the International Center for Biomedicine (ICC). He served as Professor at CU University, U.S.A. He received Doctoral degree in 1975, was a postdoctoral fellow at the NIH and the CU Medical School. Maccioni is a world-class scientist that has made some of the leading contributions to the study of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). His discoveries on the role of tau in AD, his neuroimmunomodulation theory of neurodegenerative disorders, the design of a new in vivo neuroimaging technology, novel biomarkers for its early diagnosis and innovative therapeutic approaches are among major contributions. He has served as Senior Editor and Regional Editor of the Journal of Alzheimer´s Disease and several other journals. Co-author with George Perry of the book “Current Hypotheses and Research Milestones in Alzheimer´s Disease”, among other 12 books. He is considered by the scientific community as a natural leader for his solid publications, but also for directing global projects for science development and human welfare. Maccioni is the author of around 200 publications in high-impact journals and 18 patents. His scientific findings are characterized by innovative approaches to elucidate complex problems of medical research. He is Scientific Director of Neuroinnovation, advisor for several international programs an elected member of the Danna Alliance for Brain Initiatives.

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, characterized by behavioral disorders, loss of memory and cognitive impairment affecting more than 48 millions worldwide. Cumulative evidence shows that innate immunity participates in the pathogenesis of AD. According with our neuroimmunomodulation hypothesis, microglial activation modifies the cross-talks between microglia and neurons. Thus, glial activation by the so called “damaged signals” triggers a cascade of pathological events leading to hyperphosphorylation and oligomerization of the tau protein, associated with cognitive impairment. This activation depends on the type and intensity of the stimulus. In AD, a persistently active microglial condition could generate neuronal damage and neurodegeneration favored by ApoE4, causing the release of pathological tau toward the extraneuronal environment. Released tau would subsequently cause reactivation of microglial cells, thus promoting a positive feedback and generating continuous cell damage. However, from the pathophysiological point of view, AD is significantly more complex that just inducing a loss of memory. As initial events in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disease, alterations in the dopaminergic pathway together with serotonin depletion in the elderly lead to late onset depression according with recent evidences. These events seem to occur together with immunomodulatory alterations that lead to tau oligomerization in the course of neurofibrillary tangles formation. Interestingly, mood disorders are followed by neuroinflammatory processes and structural/functional alterations that lead to cognitive impairment in the context of AD (supported by Innova Corfo and the ICC).

10:05-10:40
Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Donald A. Davidoff photo

Donald A. Davidoff

Harvard Medical School
USA

Title

Diagnostic issues and the nature of the relationship between dementia and depression

Biography

Donald A. Davidoff, Ph.D., is Chief of the Department of Neuropsychology and director of the Neuropsychology Fellowship Program at the McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School.  Dr. Davidoff is also an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Psychologist, McLean Hospital. He founded the Geriatric Neuropsychiatry Unit in 1993 and was its Psychologist-in-Charge for 15 years, retiring from that position to focus on research and the Department of Neuropsychology. He has published numerous papers and book chapters on the diagnosis and management of patients with dementia, treatment resistant affective disorders, optimal aging, the neurocognitive basis of Hoarding Disorder, nonverbal learning disabilities and affective and motivational aspects of memory functioning. He is a sought after speaker for interdisciplinary conferences and has taught courses at the American Psychiatric Association Meetings consistently for the last 15 years. He is an award-winning teacher and has mentored a large number of multi-disciplined professionals including pre- and post-doctoral psychologists and psychiatry residents. He is a member of the core faculty of the Harvard-South Shore Residency Training program and the McLean-MGH Harvard Residency Training Program.

He has served as chairman of the Commissioner’s Task Force on Alzheimer’s disease and on the State House Task Force on Elder Mental Health.  He was a board member (for 12 years) and treasurer of the Alzheimer’s Association of Massachusetts.

He is a senior consultant for the Levinson Institute (a psychologically oriented organizational consulting group) and teaches the Harvard Medical School’s CME course on Leadership for Physician Executives.

He has also co-authored five mystery novels (Amnesia, Addiction, Delusion, Obsessed, and Guilt) under the pseudonym GH Ephron.

Abstract

There are many questions and conflicting research concerning the nature of the relationship between depression and dementia, i.e., are they coincidental, unidirectionally causal, mutually influencing or do they share a common pathophysiology.

Normal and pathological aging will be reviewed with a focus on the differences between crystallized and fluid intelligence. Effects of depression on cognition as individuals age are addressed.  Depression primarily impairs reaction time and some executive functions, such as mental flexibility, such that executive functions can appear impaired. There has been no demonstration of a consistent disturbance in memory functioning resulting from depression alone, whereas dementia is characterized by memory loss. Nonetheless memory complaints are ubiquitous amongst the elderly, regardless of whether they are healthy, depressed or dementing.

No consistent and agreed upon terminology is apparent throughout the literature on the relationship between dementia and depression, confounding a current understanding. For example, DSM-5 criteria for a diagnosis of depression may currently result in an under-reporting of major depression because elder patients tend demonstrate fewer symptoms and tend to focus on somatic and/or cognitive complaints rather than on mood issues. Thus, a nosology is proposed to help clarify these issues.

Depression confounds the diagnosis of dementia and vice versa. Current research has not provided a definitive understanding of this complex relationship. Recent studies have suggested that the magnitude and trajectory of depressive symptomatology have been underappreciated.

Perhaps the single greatest problem in understanding the relationship between dementia and depression is the heterogeneous nature of the illnesses themselves. Clarification can only come when careful specification of each group is made. In effect, apples must be compared with apples and not with oranges.

11:30-12:15
Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Dawn Wiggins photo

Dawn Wiggins

New Dementians
Canada

Title

Workshop on: A therapeutic approach towards dementia care

Biography

Dawn Wiggins RPN, Certified PAC Consultant, Trainer and Mentor (Teepa Snow), Certified Dementia Practitioner and President and Director of Operations of: ‘New Dementians Professional Healthcare’.

Dawn a registered nursing professional in the province of Ontario and has over 20 years of frontline healthcare experience. She leads a dynamic team of healthcare experts dedicated to one thing-making a positive impact in the lives of people living with dementia and their care partners. Rather than focusing on “tasks” like most people, Dawn and her team focus on “caring” and bringing as much joy as possible to the lives of each and every client, everyday.

Dawn has served in a number of different capacities over the years and has a wealth of experience in acute care, long term care, psychiatric care, home care, rehabilitation and palliative care.

She has built and managed world class dementia care neighbourhoods at the institutional level.

Her greatest passion, however, is caring for people living with dementia and their care partners. PAC skills help her have a deep and unique understanding of the disease that allows her to connect with her clients and their families in a very special way. New Dementians tm  Memory Care Revolutionized  is working with expert TEEPA SNOW  http://teepasnow.com/ on her Positive Approach to Care Team.

Abstract

Anyone who works in health care knows the reality of the statistics: the incidence of dementia is on the rise and the number of people living at home with later stages of the disease is also increasing. We are all hopeful for a cure, but what do we do in the meantime? This highly interactive and hands-on workshop will introduce renowned dementia care expert Teepa Snow’s Positive Approach to Care™ philosophy and associated care skills. These skills combine care techniques that match what is known about brain function changes through dementia, with the ability to complete dynamic assessment “in the moment” for all caregivers. Using these tools has been shown to reduce the incidence of responsive behaviours, which can delay institutionalization but more importantly, enhance quality of life both for people living with dementia and, also their formal and informal care partners. Additional benefits are increased efficiency and effectiveness by shifting focus from task-driven to patient-driven care.

At the end of the session, participants will have a toolkit of simple, practical, hands on skills that can be used immediately to aim for excellence in care. In the words of Teepa herself, “Until there’s a cure…there’s care.”

12:15-13:00
Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Donald A. Davidoff photo

Donald A. Davidoff

Harvard Medical School
USA

Title

Special Session on: Mild neurocognitive disorders: improving detection, diagnosis, and early interventions

Biography

Donald A. Davidoff, Ph.D., is Chief of the Department of Neuropsychology and director of the Neuropsychology Fellowship Program at the McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School.  Dr. Davidoff is also an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Psychologist, McLean Hospital. He founded the Geriatric Neuropsychiatry Unit in 1993 and was its Psychologist-in-Charge for 15 years, retiring from that position to focus on research and the Department of Neuropsychology. He has published numerous papers and book chapters on the diagnosis and management of patients with dementia, treatment resistant affective disorders, optimal aging, the neurocognitive basis of Hoarding Disorder, nonverbal learning disabilities and affective and motivational aspects of memory functioning. He is a sought after speaker for interdisciplinary conferences and has taught courses at the American Psychiatric Association Meetings consistently for the last 15 years. He is an award-winning teacher and has mentored a large number of multi-disciplined professionals including pre- and post-doctoral psychologists and psychiatry residents. He is a member of the core faculty of the Harvard-South Shore Residency Training program and the McLean-MGH Harvard Residency Training Program.

He has served as chairman of the Commissioner’s Task Force on Alzheimer’s disease and on the State House Task Force on Elder Mental Health.  He was a board member (for 12 years) and treasurer of the Alzheimer’s Association of Massachusetts.

He is a senior consultant for the Levinson Institute (a psychologically oriented organizational consulting group) and teaches the Harvard Medical School’s CME course on Leadership for Physician Executives.

He has also co-authored five mystery novels (Amnesia, Addiction, Delusion, Obsessed, and Guilt) under the pseudonym GH Ephron.

Abstract

This talk is designed to help clinicians understand the evolution, detection, and clinical significance  of Mild Cognitive Disorder (MCI), which in DSM-5 is now termed Mild Neurocognitive Disorder (MiND). Beginning in the 1980’s the idea of a transitional stage between normal cognitive functioning in older adults and dementia began to be explored. Before that, mild cognitive symptoms were often attributed to depression or anxiety. The term MCI was first used by Reisberg and colleagues in 1988 to refer to Stage 3 on the Global Deterioration Scale. In addition, the Clinical Dementia Rating scale sought to identify early signs of dementia with an eye towards diagnosing dementia at the earliest point possible so has to maximize the efficacy of interventions. By 1999, the idea that MCI could be a prodrome or risk factor for further cognitive decline into dementia began to take hold. Initially, just as with the earlier DSM criteria for a diagnosis of dementia, early conceptions of MCI focused on the presence of memory impairments. Since these early conceptualizations, MCI has come to be associated with an acquired decline in one or more of six cognitive domains: attention, memory, language, visuospatial, executive function, or social cognition, in the context of independence in everyday day activities (i.e., complex instrumental activities of daily living). Compensatory behaviors are required to deal with this cognitive decline that is significant but not disabling.

Many elders note mild to moderate changes in cognitive functions and express concern about progression. In fact, memory complaints are ubiquitous amongst older adults. Concerns about memory or other cognitive faculties may lead an older adult to seek evaluation at this stage. Complicating accurate diagnosis is the fact cognitive symptoms often accompany psychiatric issues such as depression in older adults. Thus, an accurate diagnosis of MCI is critical to both rule out treatable causes of cognitive impairment and because MCI can represent the prodromal stage of major neurocognitive disorder, whether associated with Alzheimer’s disease or another etiology. MCI is the single best predictor of future dementia. Yet at the current time, even with the diagnostic criteria described in the DSM-5, the construct of MCI lacks clear operational clarity. While the addition of biomarkers to the diagnostic process is promising, they still require more investigation. At the current time the use of neuropsychological testing in the context of a multidisciplinary approach remains the most efficacious method to yield both an accurate diagnosis and a practical treatment plan.

  • Dementia, Dementia Care & Awareness, Alzheimers disease, Treatment Strategies, Neuroimaging
    Location: Hotel Park Inn by Radisson
Speaker

Chair

Ricardo B. Maccioni

University of Chile
Chile

Speaker

Co-Chair

Heather Palmer

Amica Mature Lifestyles
USA

Session Introduction: Monday, April 15

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Norman McNamara photo

Norman McNamara

Dementia Purple Angel Awareness Campaign
UK

Title

If I can do this living with dementia, anybody can: Norman McNamara

Biography

Norrms McNamara is a global advocate for dementia, and as a man from the UK also living with a diagnosis of Lewy Body dementia, he has been very active in working to help reduce stigma of dementia. His accomplishments include organizing the first ever Dementia Awareness Day (now an annual event), founding the Torbay Dementia Action Alliance, speaking to police and other first responders about their role in the dementia crisis, and authoring four books. He is also a frequent speaker and blogger on the topic and the inspiration behind the Purple Angel, which is quickly becoming the international symbol for dementia awareness.

Abstract

I was diagnosed aged just 50 with dementia, I had no idea but my wife Elaine (Angel) as I call her, was a professional carer/caregiver for 30 years + and she knew the signs so took me straight to the Doctors. When I was diagnosed I was devastated, I have said so many times since that I had already lost my own grandmother and father to this awful illness so I have already read the book, seen the last page, and read the last line, unless they find a cure, I KNOW what's about to happen, how it ends and because of that, went on a downward spiral for months after.

The more I looked around the more I realised there was very little out there for those with dementia and especially at the age of 50.I realised we had to do something that had never been done before which was to approach as many people as possible, with information and educate them a little in dementia. Nothing too complicated, just the basics to wet their appetite and get them to look up for more info on it.

As I write this today I can confirm that the Purple Angel campaign is now known as the Global Purple Angel campaign, we are recognised in over 55 Countries worldwide, we have nearly 1,000 Global purple Angel Ambassadors all over the world, and always looking for more. We were the first ever to open a memory cafe in the United States, Africa and Turkey.

Who cares if I can't remember what happened yesterday? As long as today is okay that's fine with me!!! Maybe keeping myself so busy has kept me as well as I am today. I think as an organisation we have helped others together and as one “TOGETHER WE ARE STRONG” The purple Angels Motto is “INCLUSION AND ENGAGEMENT FOR ALL”.

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Fangyu Peng photo

Fangyu Peng

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
USA

Title

Quantitative analysis of cerebral metabolic changes in Alzheimers disease with positron emission tomography

Biography

Fangyu Peng graduated from Jiangxi Medical College in 1982 and obtained PhD in Medical Microbiology and Immunology from University of South Florida, Tampa, USA.  He is the Director of PET Translation Imaging, UT Southwestern Medical Center, a premier academic medical center at USA. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Abstract

Aging is one of the major risk factors for development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).  Brain aging is associated with various metabolic changes that play a role in the pathophysiology of AD.  Using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-Dglucose (18F-FDG), a radiolabeled glucose analogue [1], changes of brain glucose metabolism can be evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging [2, 3].  In addition to visual assessment of altered biodistribution of 18F-FDG on PET images, semi-quantitative analysis of 18F-FDG radioactivity localized within a brain region of interest (ROI) increase sensitivity and specificity of 18F-FDG for diagnostic imaging of AD [Figure 1].  PET quantitative analysis is a useful technology for elucidation of the role of various metabolic changes in development and pathophysiology of AD [4].

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Bobbi Carducci photo

Bobbi Carducci

Author and National Speaker
USA

Title

Prepare to care- what every adult needs to know about Alzheimers/dementia before and after it strikes home

Biography

Bobbi Carducci is a Caregiver Advocate, Support Group Leader, Author and National Speaker on Caregiver Issues in the U.S. In-home caregiver for seven years for father-in-law with multiple comorbidities, including, Lewy Body dementia and schizophrenia. Author, Confessions of an Imperfect Caregiver and Caregiver You Are Not Alone.

Abstract

According to the Alzheimer’s organization, at present one in three seniors will die from some form of dementia and the numbers are expected to double or triple in the next ten to fifteen years. As the numbers of people needing care increases the need for in-home caregivers will follow. Beds in hospitals, nursing homes, and memory care facilities will fill and the costs will increase.

Adults in their thirties, forties, and above need to know what is coming in the next ten to fifteen years and how important it is to begin to prepare now. 

This presentation will include:

Alzheimer’s and Dementia – So much more than a memory problem.

  • The difference in memory loss between normal aging and Alzheimer’s or one of the many other forms of dementia.
  • Traumatic brain disease and the effects on behavior.

Financial and personal impact of dementia on the entire family.

  • Creating a care team before it is needed.
  • The need for long term care insurance.
  • Power of attorney or guardianship?
  • Home care or residential care? There is no wrong answer.

How to Resist Trying to Manage the Unmanageable and Ease Tension at Home

  • Suggestions on how respond to the often confusing and upsetting dementia behaviors.
  • What to Do When You Don’t Know What to Do.

Where to Go for Help

  • Caregiver support groups
  • Caregiver conferences
  • Dementia Care Homes

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Neja Samar Brencic photo

Neja Samar Brencic

IZRIIS Institute
Slovenia

Title

IONIS - Indoor and outdoor solution for dementia challenges

Biography

Neja Samar Brencic is a researcher and developer at the IZRIIS institute. She holds a Masters in psychology degree at the University of Ljubljana. She has dedicated last 15 years to develop end-user experience and validation programs in Slovenia in EU.

Abstract

Demographic changes and the aging population in Europe increase the demand for some particular ICT services – including e-health and e-care services. The reasons are multiple: we want to address specifically the increase of symptoms related to dementia. In Slovenia we have 33.000 diagnosed patients. Many professionals at the clinics recognize that there is no connection between the care at the clinic and home care. What to do with the patient with dementia after they leave the hospital?

IONIS project financed within the EU-AAL program perspective aims at developing a European-wide service concept specifically for people with dementia and their families.

At the moment in some countries in EU, patients at home use bracelets, watches and fitness bands connected to smart phones to give caregivers some idea of what is going on with the patient. In Slovenia this is almost non-existent. Currently IONIS is developing solutions to fill the gaps with integrated and validated health monitoring, home automation, and personal agenda with reminders, alerts, caregiver administrative tools and profile specifically for dementia patients. The IONIS platform will offer integration of services and technology to benefit both patients and caregivers.

IONIS will create the network of support for the patients, families and health professionals.

Such programs as IONIS will help to support the continuation of care form the clinical environment to the home care environment.

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Fatemeh Eslami photo

Fatemeh Eslami

Shahid Lavasani Hospital
Iran

Title

How do support for people with dementia in Iran? A nursing care approach

Biography

Fatemeh Eslami has completed his Bachelor’s degree program in Nursing 2003, Kashan University of Medical Sciences and Health Care Services, and Master’s Degree in the field of Social Sciences Research at North Tehran Branch from Azad University of Tehran, Iran. . She is the nursing staff of Shahid Lavasani Hospital, a hospital of Ministry of Cooperatives, Labor, and Social Welfare.

Abstract

In the World Alzheimer Report 2009, Alzheimer Disease International estimated that 36 million people worldwide with dementia, with numbers doubling every 20 years to 66 million by 2030, and 115 million by 2050. 58% of those with dementia currently live in low and middle income countries, rising to 71% by 2050. Dementia develops when the parts of the brain that are involved with learning, memory, decision-making, and language are affected by any of various infections or diseases. The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease, but there are numerous other known causes. Comparing Iran's population age pyramid in the past two decades illustrates that the structure of age pyramid is reversing. It shows that in the coming years the present young population will incline towards aging. There are some important characteristics of dementia in general and Alzheimer Disease specifically in Iran in terms of culture, public knowledge and socioeconomic aspects. The prevalence of cognitive impairment and dementia is increasing in Iran.  Although there is no confirmed study available on the prevalence of dementia at the national level in Iran, but some studies indicate that some 700,000 individuals are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in Iran so the disease should be taken seriously.

An important aspect of the nurse’s role is to observe and report any potential signs of underlying dementia. Iranian Nurse, as a healthcare professional, who comes in contact with people with dementia must able to signpost them to appropriate support. In this article we will present A Nursing  Care Approach for People with Dementia in Iran.

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Laurie Gunter Mantz photo

Laurie Gunter Mantz

Dementia Training for Life
USA

Title

Treatment of dementia symptoms: a person-centred approach

Biography

Laurie Gunter Mantz is an Occupational Therapist, a Certified Dementia Trainer, and the founder of Dementia Training for Life, LLC, an organization that specializes in the training of healthcare professionals on the care of those with neurodegenerative disorders. With more than 30 yrs. of clinical and educational experience Laurie’s concentration is now to facilitate dementia capable care from the home, supported care, hospitals and LTC to enable independence and quality of life throughout the life spectrum.

Abstract

According to the Oxford dictionary, the definition of purpose is “the reason for which something is done or created or for which something exists.” Every person, despite illness, disability or age needs purpose. Humans need a reason to “be”, and that purpose is as unique and significant as every single being, even with dementia.

Despite the lack of success in discovering disease modifying medications, behavioral science has shown significant advances in addressing many of the symptoms of neurodegenerative conditions, improving quality of life, reducing the use of antipsychotic medications, and advancing person-centered care throughout the disease process. The keys to a rewarding, happy and purposeful life, while learning to accommodate to the changes from a brain disorder, require an educated support system, an environment adapted to meet the individual’s needs, the use of verbal and non-verbal communication, and flexible care providers.

This presentation will demonstrate the benefits of non-pharmacological interventions in all areas of life and care, from the home to the hospital, for those living with and caring for neurodegenerative conditions.

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Iris Gladys Zayas Martinez photo

Iris Gladys Zayas Martinez

Tropical Medicine Institute Pedro Kouri (IPK)
Cuba

Title

Relationship between chronic infection by Toxoplasma gondii and Alzheimers disease

Biography

Iris Gladys Zayas Martínez, 49 years old, graduated in medicine 29 years ago at the Medical University "Carlos J. Finlay" of Camagüey, Cuba. 2nd Degree Specialist in Microbiology, graduate of Master in infectious diseases and tropical diseases at the Institute of Tropical Medicine Pedro Kouri (IPK), Cuba.

Member of the Cuban Scientific Society of Parasitology and Microbiology for 22 years. I have participated in 18 national and international conferences and congresses in Cuba and in the 2nd international congress of the Girassol Clinic in Luanda, Angola. Publications: 5 scientific articles in national journals.

I am currently working in the department of parasitology, in the laboratory of Toxoplasma of the Tropical Medicine Institute Pedro Kouri (IPK). Cuba.

At this moment, a research project is underway (Toxoplasma gondii infection and Alzheimer's disease. Demonstration of possible association in Cuban senior citizens. It will be held in our Institute in collaboration with the Dementia Consultation of the Neurology Institute, Havana, Cuba.

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is one of the most widely distributed neurotropic pathogens in the world; approximately, one third of the world population is infected by this parasite, the causative agent of Toxoplasmosis. Historically, chronic infection has been considered a latent stage and was only associated with pathogenesis in individuals with some compromise of their immune system. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequent of neurodegenerative diseases; it is also the most common cause of demential syndrome. The suggested conference is aimed at highlighting the main aspects that relate to chronic T.gondii infection and AD. Recent studies have shown that chronic infection by this pathogen causes neurophysiological changes, in wish  three mechanisms are involved: the immune response to the parasite, hormonal changes and variations in neurotransmitters, all leading to neuroinflammation. All those relate the parasite with the pathogenesis of dementia, especially those that produce neurodegeneration. The role of T.gondii in the development of AD remains a hotly debated topic, with multiple investigations being carried out to try to link this parasite to that entity and determine whether infection by this entity is a risk factor or can play a role protector in the appearance of EA.

Tuesday, April 16

10:00 AM
Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Philip A McMillan photo

Philip A McMillan

MRCP
UK

Title

Dementia is a disease of the ependymal layer: Novel theory from looking at cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis

Biography

Dr Philip McMillan is a Consultant in the NHS with over 23 years of medical expertise. His primary focus has been around Geriatrics and Neurological Rehabilitation and has developed unique perspectives on the capacity of the brain to recover from injuries and disease.  Through international collaboration he has proposed a nutritional protocol for dementia reversal and has recently had a breakthrough theory on the pathology of dementia. His current aim is to lead the field of dementia to a new direction of research and treatment of this devastating disease.

Abstract

The intricacies of dementia are explored in relation to varied studies on brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis and used to delineate the primary pathology of the latter.
The theory examines the high frequency of cognitive impairment (Jongen 2012) in Multiple Sclerosis and its early manifestation during the disease.  The fact that there is associated brain atrophy cannot be explained by the degree of damage to neurons. (Carlos 2015) noted a 5 to 10 times greater rate of atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis.
The cognitive changes with Multiple Sclerosis are then correlated embryologically to the subependymal zone (Kazanis 2009) explaining the pathology of brain atrophy and why we have not made more progress through research.
Our understanding of the blood CSF barrier and the brain CSF interaction is poorly understood and probably holds the key to the symptoms of dementia (Erikson 2013). This interaction between the CSF and brain interstitial space is coordinated by the ependymal and subependymal zone of the brain. This is a novel concept that will aim to explain the links of all forms of dementia, as well as directing fertile areas for research.

10:35-11:10
Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Heather Palmer photo

Heather Palmer

Amica Mature Lifestyles
Canada

Title

The Amica cognitive well-being program: maximizing capacity for residents

Biography

Heather Palmer is currently the National Director, Cognitive Well-Being and the Founder and Director of Cognitive Rehabilitation for Maximum Capacity Inc.  After completing her PhD in Neuropsychology from the University of New South Wales Australia, she carried out a 3 year postdoctoral fellowship at the Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre and then went on to become the Research Director for the Alzheimer Society of Canada. With over 30 years of scientific and clinical experience in the area of brain-behaviour relationships. Heather has been inducted into the Havergal College Hall of Distinction for her contribution to seniors brain health. Heather has many publications and speaks internationally on the topic of neurocognitive rehabilitation for seniors and cancer survivors. She designs and teaches techniques and strategies to help people ‘re-wire’ their brain so they can think, feel and function their best. Currently she provides supportive, educational and innovative cognitive well-being programs for all communities managed by Amica Mature Lifestyles, with a primary focus on the Memory Care and Assisted Living neighbourhoods.

Abstract

Physical aging is widely accepted, and as a result, adaptive devices, tools and supports are implemented to compensate for physical challenges. Cognitive aging and dementia, on the other hand, tend to be stigmatized, with less awareness, understanding and acceptance. As a result, techniques and strategies to address both normal and abnormal cognitive aging are underutilized. The Amica approach to supporting cognitive well- being has a conceptual framework that applies to all Residents, whether they live in Independent living, Assisted Living or Memory Care. Through awareness, education and Team Member training, we maximize how Residents think, feel and function. Team Members receive extensive Amica-developed training in the areas of: 1) normal and abnormal cognitive aging, 2) personalization through Discovery, 3) a Cognitive Aging and Dementia Interactive experience (CADIE), and 4) a unique Behavior Support Program (BSP) that shares responsibility across all Team Members. Focusing on simple, effective and sustainable approaches, Residents live purposeful and meaningful lives with support that is balanced across multiple domains including an increased emphasis on goal attainment and psychological well-being. Empowering and supporting Residents to maximize potential is the goal. In this session the Amica Cognitive Well-Being Program will be shared with heightened emphasis on; 1) the culture change that was required, 2) multiple success stories, 3) the role and emphasis on neuroplasticity, and 4) general principles that can be utilized to benefit Residents living in any community, any environment, and anywhere along their cognitive journey.

11:30-12:15
Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Wayne Mesker photo

Wayne Mesker

Alive Inside Foundation
USA

Title

Special session on: Unforgettable- the miracle of music & mind

Biography

Wayne “Woody” Mesker is the Outreach / Creative Advocacy Director of the Alive Inside Foundation. A life-long Music Lover who just celebrated his 67th Birthday in January has been a performer since he had a vocal solo during his Christmas Concert when he was in first grade. He is also the Founder of Rock Against Dementia (RAD). Along with Purple Angels’ Norman McNamara & Jane Moore he co-founded World Rock Against Dementia (WRAD) in 2016. The event has produced a growing Global impact.

Abstract

It is a well - documented & proven fact that one of the last parts of the brain to be affected by Alzheimer’s disease or other types of Dementia is the part that recognizes & responds to music

Our minds connect to music from pre-birth which presents us with an amazing opportunity to reach those with Dementia or other Cognitive issues especially when using Music that carries some personal / emotional connection.

We will show using video clips how effective this musical intervention is & include testimonials from Family members & volunteers from several of the Alive Inside Foundation’s projects about the “Unforgettable” difference this has made in the lives of the Elders with Dementia & in their own lives as well

I will share my own experience of watching Eleanor come Alive with a little love from two young volunteers & the simple act of listening to her favourite music as well as my experience & those of our young Avalon Park Middle School Choir (Just outside of Orlando) students from Florida.

12:15-13:00
Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Keynote Speaker Ricardo B. Maccioni photo

Ricardo B. Maccioni

University of Chile
Chile

Title

Multitarget compounds vs monotargets therapy in AD treatment

Biography

Dr. Maccioni is Professor of Neurology and Neurosciences, University of Chile, Director of the Laboratory of Neurosciences and the International Center for Biomedicine (ICC). He served as Professor at CU University, U.S.A. He received Doctoral degree in 1975, was a postdoctoral fellow at the NIH and the CU Medical School. Maccioni is a world-class scientist that has made some of the leading contributions to the study of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). His discoveries on the role of tau in AD, his neuroimmunomodulation theory of neurodegenerative disorders, the design of a new in vivo neuroimaging technology, novel biomarkers for its early diagnosis and innovative therapeutic approaches are among major contributions. He has served as Senior Editor and Regional Editor of the Journal of Alzheimer´s Disease and several other journals. Co-author with George Perry of the book “Current Hypotheses and Research Milestones in Alzheimer´s Disease”, among other 12 books. He is considered by the scientific community as a natural leader for his solid publications, but also for directing global projects for science development and human welfare. Maccioni is the author of around 200 publications in high-impact journals and 18 patents. His scientific findings are characterized by innovative approaches to elucidate complex problems of medical research. He is Scientific Director of Neuroinnovation, advisor for several international programs an elected member of the Danna Alliance for Brain Initiatives.

Abstract

  • Ageing & Dementia, Dementia Care & Awareness, Therapeutic Approach towards Dementia
    Location: Hotel Park Inn by Radisson
Speaker

Chair

Philip McMillan

MRCP
United Kingdom

Speaker

Co-Chair

Laurie Gunter Mantz

Dementia Training for Life
USA

Session Introduction: Tuesday, April 16

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Ian James Martins photo

Ian James Martins

Edith Cowan University
Australia

Title

Biotherapeutics and chronic diseases with relevance to insulin resistance and dementia

Biography

Dr. Ian James Martins is an Editor/Reveiwer for Open Acess Pub/MDPI journals/other international journals. Advisory Board Member for Photon Journal. Fellow of International Agency for Standards and Ratings (IASR). Conferred with the RICHARD KUHN RESEARCH AWARD-2015 ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM. Chief Editor for International Journal of Diabetes Research (2014-2018), Research and Reviews: Neuroscience (2016-2018) and Journal of Diabetes and Clinical Studies (2017-2018). BIT Member (BIT Congress. Inc) with an H-index of 64 and Scientist for The Science Advisory Board (USA) and an Academic with Academia.edu.

Abstract

Biotherapeutics and nutritional biotherapy have become important to reverse global chronic diseases such as non alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease that have become of major concern to the developed and developing world. Factors such as stress, core body temperature and food quality influence biotherapeutics with chronic and neurodegenerative diseases associated with dementia and dementia care. Biotherapeutics that involve Indian spice therapy require reassessment with relevance to the prevention of uncontrolled mitochondrial apoptosis. The identification of anti-aging genes are necessary for biotherapeutics and the understanding of transcriptional regulation of gene expression and maintenance of cell survival in the periphery and the brain. These anti-aging genes are linked to appetite, longevity and mitochondrial biogenesis with relevance to the dementia care in various global populations. The role of biotherapeutics such as magnesium therapy is associated with cell survival and reassessment of biotherapeutics with relevance to insulin resistance and programmed cell death is critical to dementia and dementia care.

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Vahid Haji photo

Vahid Haji

Shahid Nikpour Special Clinic
Iran

Title

Caring for those living with dementia: 7e dementia care model can make a difference

Biography

Vahid Haji has completed his Bachelor’s degree program in Nursing 2004, Shahed University of Medical Sciences. He is the nursing staff of Shahid Nikpour Special Clinic of Ministry of Cooperatives, Labor, and Social Welfare. He is director for improving quality and clinical methods of patient care. He is certified internationally in the fields of l quality care standards.

Abstract

Dementia is considered by a progressive weakening of cognitive ability. Persons with dementia have multiple cognitive deficits include both memory impairment, and or more of the following symptoms-aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, or executive dysfunction. The most common type of dementia is Alzheimer Dementia, which accounts for 50% of all patients with dementia. Also, there are other kinds of dementia such as Vascular Dementia, Parkinson Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, Lewy body Dementia. If these persons hospitalize for other acute or chronic conditions, understanding the difference between delirium and the different types of dementia is difficult. Conventional views pertaining to geriatric nursing often paint a picture of the care as being slow paced, predictable, and less demanding than acute care. Therefore, care of the elderly, and in particular those with dementia, is often complex, unpredictable, and unstable.

Dementia has a detrimental impact on a person’s self-worth as it progressively deteriorates their ability to independently perform daily activities, affecting both mental and physical capacity. Nurses offer a unique contribution to improved living standards for those living with dementia as they provide a majority of the personal daily treatment requirements and embrace a holistic care model focusing on person-centeredness. Nurses are responsible for implementing and supervising most of the everyday activities for patients within care facilities and play a key role in encouraging involvement. In this article we will discuss “7E Dementia Care Model” as a novel care of Dementia.

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Bernadette Rock photo

Bernadette Rock

Alzheimer Society of Ireland
Ireland

Title

Human rights based approach to dementia research and service delivery

Biography

Bernadette is Manager of Policy and Research in the Alzheimer Society of Ireland (ASI). Bernadette has recently developed ASI's new research strategy 2017-2020 including a research funding strategy. Within this strategy a key focus is developing a Person Public Involvement, and supporting people with dementia to engage in research activities. The meaningful involvement of people with dementia and their carers in research is a core priority within ASI’s function, and Bernadette is working strategically to amplify voices in research.  Bernadette is also facilitating a research prioritisation process with the aim of bringing together people with dementia, carers, researchers and health and social care professionals to identify and prioritise dementia research questions.

A graduate of Trinity College and UCD Bernadette was awarded a PhD in Sociology for research on fatherhood and parenting identities. Bernadette is an experienced researcher and her research interests include family, childhood and disability, and health policy.

Abstract

“My journey shows that people with dementia are more than just a condition; they are citizens who want active lives and have fundamental needs”, Helen Rochford-Brennan, European Working Group of People with Dementia.

In April 2016, The Alzheimer Society of Ireland (ASI) and the Irish Dementia Working Group published a Charter of Rights for People with Dementia, calling for greater participation, accountability, equality, empowerment, and legal recognition for the rights of people with dementia. The Charter adopts the principles of PANEL, which refer to Participation, Accountability, Non-Discrimination and Equality, Empowerment and Legality.

This presentation explores how the ASI strives to impart these rights and principles in its research into people with dementia and also as part of its delivery of services for clients with dementia. The ASI supports research into key areas that can influence and improve the quality of life of people with dementia and carers, and receives a high volume of research requests. ASI strives to ensure that the rights of people with dementia are put at the very centre of research and that those with dementia are empowered to be as involved as possible in research.

This presentation also shows how this rights approach is carried through to service delivery, as ASI services operate to meet the needs of people with dementia from a human rights perspective.

Panel provides a framework with important elements to keep in mind if we want to promote respect for the rights of people with dementia in research.

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Fatemeh Khorshidi photo

Fatemeh Khorshidi

Hazrat Rasool Hospital
Iran

Title

Dementia in Iranian people: "Exercise training" nursing care approach

Biography

Fatemeh Khorshidi has completed his Bachelor’s degree program in Nursing 2004, from Azad University of Rasht Branch. She is a nursing staff of Hazarat Rasoul Hospital,  Ministry of Cooperatives, Labor, and Social Welfare in Rasht, Iran. She has good experiences in the field of home health care as a special nurse, more than 18 years. She is co-director for improving quality of life department in nursing division of the hospital. She is certified nationally in this field.

Abstract

The prevalence of cognitive impairment and dementia is increasing in Iran and the world.  The average annual growth rate of aged population over 65 is annually 2.5%. In Iran, the growth rate of 4.3% in 1995 has increased to 5.2% in 2005, and it is estimated to reach more than 7.2%.   Memory impairment and amnesia is the most common disease in the old age. According to the statistics reported by the Iranian Alzheimer Association, about 450,000 patients suffer from this disease. A person with dementia will need more care and support as their symptoms get worse over time. This may mean that a move into a care home can better meet their needs. There are 2 main types of care home including residential care homes and nursing homes. Anyway in the both situations, there are common nursing care approach. This approach includes: Set a positive mood for interaction; Get the person’s attention; State your message clearly; Ask simple, answerable questions; Listen with your ears, eyes, and heart; Break down activities into a series of steps;  When the going gets tough, distract and redirect; Respond with affection and reassurance; Remember the good old days; Maintain your sense of humor. Some studies investigate the effect of 8 weeks of exercise on improving symptoms of dementia in elderly male and female. They suggest that physical activity can improve cognitive and motor symptoms in dementia in elderly and it can be used as a non-pharmacological treatment and a supplement or as a method of prevention in the elderly. In another study with 250 elderly participants in Iran, who resided in the nursing house, who were fine physically and mentally, uneducated and without regular exercises and mental activities were selected. According to the findings of present study, physical, mental and combined activities (physical and mental) cause an increase for the memory function. In this article we will disuse the exercise training nursing care approach.

Meetings International - Dementia 2019 Conference Session Speaker Chuck Williams photo

Chuck Williams

The Healthy Brain Research Center
Canada

Title

The Black Widow project

Biography

Dr. Chuck Williams has completed his Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology from Pepperdine University.

PhD in Clinical Psychology from California Coast University.

Postdoctoral in Neuropsychology from U.C. Berkeley School of Psychology.

Dr. Williams is currently seeking certification from Harvard University in Microfluidics, Tissue Engineering,, and Nutrient delivery.

He is the CEO and Director at The Healthy Brain Research Centre in Winkler, Manitoba Canada. (Side note: Dr. Chuck Williams is also the former Mr. America, Mr. Universe, and IFBB World Champion Bodybuilder. As well as the former NHB Full Contact World Champion-USA Track and Field Olympic Level 5 Sprints and Hurdles coach, and trainer to professional athletes around the world).

 

Abstract

In the incidences of Alzheimer’s and Dementia, women experience the ravages of these diseases at a rate of 70%. Therefore women are at a greater risk for mental health problems, including Chronic Depression and Suicide ideations/attempts. Alzheimer’s and Dementia as it stands is considered the number one personal, economic and social burden in the world. Researcher around the globe have stated that women who have incidences of these diseases quality of life deteriorates at such a rapid rate before death therein more difficult to treat psychologically and medically. It is important to note that there has never been a study to improve the quality of life of these patients through neuronal resuscitation or the reviving of a dying neuron and its impact on the longevity and quality of life.

The purpose of this study commencing in September 2018, using over 1000 participants (50%-women), is to describe the rapid onset and deterioration of women`s health in seeking current treatment modalities, versus a multi-faceted program utilizing participant age groups, in-depth individual, family therapy, group therapy, pre and post 3T MRI brain images, physiotherapy, physical training-mobility, chiropractic-neurology, and nutritional supplementation specific to the individuals DNA and neuronal issues presented in the MRI images and in our histology lab

Findings: The basic tenets at hospitals and medical facilities were to look at the amyloid distribution of scarring or bundling to determine the progress of the disease. There were no programs in place with the exception of palliative care, to address the syndromes of the disease with or without the presence of scarring or bundling.  This study will elucidate the ability to impact the misfolding of proteins (prions), address the endocrinology of women that exacerbates the disease (menstrual cycle/estrogen), as well as look at the way in which the hemispheres communicate differently thus exposing women to a greater risk.

My team and I focused our attention on the impact of gene mutations on the function of mitochondria and on the function of neurons, and, in particular the death of neurons in the brain. Drs. Williams and LaValle have developed new approaches to cross the blood brain barrier via nasal distribution, in order to lower or stop the function of mutated genes, developing behavioral assays to monitor the functional impact.

Drs. Williams, Greenway, and Kosik have been expanding on their recent efforts to develop approaches to track and monitor multiple readouts of mitochondrial and neuronal function. These studies have led to exciting MRI observations, observational improvements of cognitive functioning, longevity, and increased quality of life, many of these findings which will be published in international journals, and other publications to come during the upcoming year. 

After years of collaboration, the group has achieved great progress in its objectives to resuscitate the function of mitochondria and increase the function of otherwise dying neurons and other pertinent cells of the brain.