Agenda

Date

July 22, 2020

Location

Toronto, Canada

Conference Agenda

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Keynote Session:

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Roksana Zarychta photo

Roksana Zarychta

Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland

Title: Reconstruction of the morphology and hydrography of the centre of Cracow (Poland) in the historical period (9th-12th AD)

Biography:

Roksana Zarychta, geomorphologist, germanist, current employment: Institute of Geography, Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (Department of Geoinformation and Environmental Research). Her scientific interests include the use of GIS in the analysis of changes in topography of anthropogenically modelled areas.

Abstract:

In the town centres with a long history, the initial topography is masked mainly by a layer of cultural deposits. The sediments considerable change the initial morphology of towns including range of landforms, and surface waters (e.g. wetlands), and finally the initial morphometry of urban areas (absolute and relative heights, slopes, aspects). The subject of the study is the historic centre of Cracow (former capital of Poland) where the early-medieval relief (up to the 8th century) became masked due to the rapid increase in cultural deposits. The aim of the investigation is the reconstruction of morphology and hydrography of this area relating to the period of mid-medieval time (9th-12th). On the basis of rich sources of data (e.g. geoengineering, archaeology) and historical maps of the town, a hypsometric map and digital elevation model (DEM) have been generated, which showed the reconstructed morphology and hydrography of the study area. An estimation by ordinary kriging method were carried out. The final cartographic work was prepared with the use of Surfer software. The former distribution and limit of landforms (Pleistocene terrace, Holocene floodplain, meandering Vistula river channel, secondary channels, limestone hills) in the study area before the 13th century is presented as a proposed variant of the geomorphological and hydrographic maps prepared by the authors. The former relief and distribution of wetlands was evaluated in terms of its potential for encouraging medieval settlement.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Adam Lajczak photo

Adam Lajczak

Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland

Title: Anthropogenic deposits in the city and their impact on land changes. Case study of historical centre of Cracow, Poland

Biography:

Adam Lajczak, geomorphologist, hydrologist, current employment: Institute of Geography, Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (head of Department of Geoinformation and Environmental Research). Recently he has been focusing on the research on geoecology of mountains and their forelands, rivers valleys, marshy areas and anthropogenically degraded areas (including towns).

Abstract:

In research on land changes in historic town centres, the focus is on assessing the spatial differentiation of the thickness of cultural deposits and ultimately on assessing changes in some parameters that write the morphometry of the study areas. The material intentionally deposited in towns with a long tradition of development (hundreds or even several thousand years) comes  mainly from demolished buildings. The second way in land changes of towns was to build up the level of streets and squares mainly with mineral material. Other changes in the topography of towns were associated with the deposition of garbage, often outside town borders. The purpose of the presentation is to reconstruct the differences between paleotopography and modern topography of the historic centre of Cracow in the last millennium. The research area (9 km2) is located in the Vistula river valley in southern Poland, in which there are limestone hills surrounded by fluvial forms. The paleotopography studied represents the situation before the 8th century without significant human impact. On the basis of rich data sources (e.g. geoengineering and archaeology), a hypsometric map and digital elevation model (DEM) were generated, which showed the reconstructed paleotopography of the researched area. DEM from aerial laser scanning (ALS DEM) shows the contemporary topography of Cracow centre. The use of selected morphometric parameters allows quantitative assessment of spatial changes in absolute height, in  local levelling, slopes and exposures. In the centre of Cracow, these changes included building up and flattening the area.

In research on land changes in historic town centres, the focus is on assessing the spatial differentiation of the thickness of cultural deposits and ultimately on assessing changes in some parameters that write the morphometry of the study areas. The material intentionally deposited in towns with a long tradition of development (hundreds or even several thousand years) comes  mainly from demolished buildings. The second way in land changes of towns was to build up the level of streets and squares mainly with mineral material. Other changes in the topography of towns were associated with the deposition of garbage, often outside town borders. The purpose of the presentation is to reconstruct the differences between paleotopography and modern topography of the historic centre of Cracow in the last millennium. The research area (9 km2) is located in the Vistula river valley in southern Poland, in which there are limestone hills surrounded by fluvial forms. The paleotopography studied represents the situation before the 8th century without significant human impact. On the basis of rich data sources (e.g. geoengineering and archaeology), a hypsometric map and digital elevation model (DEM) were generated, which showed the reconstructed paleotopography of the researched area. DEM from aerial laser scanning (ALS DEM) shows the contemporary topography of Cracow centre. The use of selected morphometric parameters allows quantitative assessment of spatial changes in absolute height, in  local levelling, slopes and exposures. In the centre of Cracow, these changes included building up and flattening the area.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Ernest Berkman photo

Ernest Berkman

Ernest Berkman , Emerald Exploration Consultants, Florida

Title: Regional Geology and Exploration Potential of Mongolia utilizing Public Domain Data

Biography:

Ernest Berkman graduated from the Colorado School of Mines, Geophysical Engineer, 1958. He worked for Mobil Oil for 20 years and then started EMEX. At EMEX, his experience includes prospect analysis and regional geological/geophysical studies including reflection seismic, gravity, magnetics, magneto-tellurucs, refraction analysis, in North America and worldwide; plus a lot of shallow seismic for coal mine development and site characterization. Interpretation background includes site characterization, and technical writing, modeling, quality control, project and team management, industrial teaching, and mentoring. He has been a member of the SEG since 1955

Abstract:

The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the public domain data in Mongolia and adjacent countries. This presentation includes discussions of the geologic setting, plate tectonics, the geothermal regime, satellite imagery, seismic, gravity and magnetic data, and ancillary data; and concludes with a discussion of several productive basins in northern China. Our analysis clearly confirms that regional scale geological mapping and gravity and magnetic surveys along with plate tectonic implications, satellite imagery analysis, and ancillary data give good indications of the presence of basin areas, which appear to contain sedimentary rocks of Cretaceous, Jurassic and Paleozoic age, which are considered to be prospective for commercial hydrocarbon accumulation. Continued exploration with higher quality potential field data and seismic data, leading to drilling is recommended.

The discussion on geologic setting includes a simplified surface geology map, coal and oil resource maps, stratigraphic columns, and example seismic sections. The discussion on plate tectonics presents hypotheses for the origin of this complex area. The discussion on geothermal regime utilizes both the limited data available in Mongolia and the newly available data in Northern China to strengthen the argument that Mongolia is a valid exploration target. Satellite images confirm geologic structures noted in the literature and observed in the gravity and magnetic data. The regional gravity data has been used to characterize the basin shape and major structural elements involving the older denser strata. This is a clearly valid use of the technique as shown by seismic data in China over numerous oil fields.

Meetings International -  Conference Keynote Speaker Manoj Khandelwal photo

Manoj Khandelwal

Federation University, Australia

Title: Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering, Rock Blasting, Environmental Geotechnology, Slope Stability, Ground Control

Biography:

 
Manoj Khandelwal is a Senior Lecturer at Federation University, Australia. He is an Australian Endeavour Fellow and a member of AusIMM, SAIMM, MEAI with an established teaching and research profile in the field of mining engineering. Dr Khandelwal has been recognized as a leading expert in the area of ‘Mining Geomechanics’ and ‘Rock Blasting’. So far, Dr Khandelwal has published more than 100 research papers in different reputed national and international journals with high impact factors and reputable conference proceedings. He is the Editor-in-chief of three reputed journals and also on the editorial board of more than twenty refereed international journals published from various continents. He is the reviewer for more than 75 international reputed journals He has received certificates of outstanding contribution in reviewing from a number of international journals.

Abstract:

Khandelwal has published more than 100 research papers in different reputed national and international journals with high impact factors and reputable conference proceedings. He is the Editor-in-chief of three reputed journals and also on the editorial board of more than twenty refereed international journals published from various continents. He is the reviewer for more than 75 international reputed journals He has received certificates of outstanding contribution in reviewing from a number of international journals.

Oral Session 1:

  • Planetology | Cosmo-chemistry | Atmospheric science | Glaciology and Hydrology | SpacePhysics and Astrobiology | Environmental ScienceNatural Hazards | Geosciences and Geology |
Meetings International - Earth Science 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Ostad-Ali-Askari photo

Ostad-Ali-Askari

Isfahan University of Technology, Iran

Title: Effect of Management Strategies on Reducing Negative Impacts of Climate Change on Water Resources of the Isfahan-Borkhar Aquifer Using MODFLOW: Strategies on Reducing Negative Impacts of Climate Change.

Biography:

Kaveh Ostad-Ali-Askari is a Ph.D. of Civil Engineering, Postdoctoral Student of Civil Engineering, Department of Water Resources Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad, Isfahan, Iran. He collaborates as Editorial Board Membership in more than 45 Journals and as reviewers in more than 30 Journals. Currently, Associate, Editor-in-Chief of of IJREH. He has contributed to more than 210 publications in Journals, Books and Technical Reports. He was a Visiting Assistant Professor at Canadian University Dubai, and American University in Dubai. On the research side, he started a research partnership in 2017 with Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract:

His interested topics including Groundwater Hydrology, Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Sustainable Development and Environmental Assessment, Climate and Integrated and Sustainable Water Resource Management, Water System Engineering, Water Resources Planning, Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm. He has contributed to more than 194 publications in Journals, Books, or as Technical Reports. Currently, he is as Faculty Member of Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Khorasgan) Branch, Iran.

Meetings International - Earth Science 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Orji Prince photo

Orji Prince

University of Nigeria, Nigeria

Title: Measurement and analyses of concentrations of methane (CH4) and nitrogen-dioxide (NO2) gases at a quarry site.

Biography:

Orji Prince Orji has a Masters Degree in Atmospheric Physics from Abia State University, Uturu, Nigeria. He is currently undergoing a PhD programme (with a research interest in “dampening of signal strength for propagation due to atmospheric constituents)  in same institution. Orji is currently an academic staff of the University of Nigeria. He has published five (5) journal papers with reputable journals.

Abstract:

Measurement and analyses of the concentrations of NO2 and CH4 gases in ambient air at Setraco quarry site, Abia State, Nigeria (latitude 05⁰33N and 06⁰03N, and longitude 10⁰E and 07⁰29E) were carried out in this study. The gases were measured using two automatic air samplers namely EM-4 Type Multi-P detector and AIKE EM-201 Gas meter. The measurements were made at three sampling points; the engine house, petrol station and crushing site for 12 weeks (7th August – 6th November, 2017) at one (1) hour interval per session for three sessions (morning, afternoon and evening) in a day. It was observed that at petrol station, the mean concentration of methane was highest with a value of 3.14±0.8% which is much higher than World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation of 0.1% exposure limit for 8hours working time. The lowest mean concentration at the petrol station was 0.39±0.08% which is still quite high and above deleterious level or the WHO acceptable limit. At the Engine House, the highest mean concentration of NO2 measured was 375±4.0ppm, which is higher than World Health Organization (WHO) and Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA) acceptable limit of 4.89ppm for weekly mean concentration. The Air quality index (AQI) calculation for the NO2 concentration of 375±4.0ppm yielded a health-threatening value of 153 especially for people with heart and breathing problem. These results imply that NO2 is emitted more at the Engine house, less at the Petrol station and much less at the Crushing site while CH4 is emitted more at the Petrol station than Engine house and Crushing site.

Meetings International - Earth Science 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Hamida Diab photo

Hamida Diab

Badji Mokhtar University,Algeria

Title: Mechanism of formation, mineralogy and geochemistry of the oolitic iron ore deposit of Djebel Had, northeast Algeria

Biography:

Diab Hamida is an Engineer geologist in the National office of Geological and Mining Research (ORGM) Tébessa-Algeria. She got her diploma engineer in Sedimentary Geology from University of Tebessa. Her extensive and diverse training in sedimentology, geotechnical and mining geology allowed her to enrich and deepen her knowledge in the field of exploration and exploitation of natural resources

Abstract:

The Djebel Had Iron Formation (DHIF) is an eight meter thick stratiform sedimentary iron deposit, a part of the mining district of south Tebessa, in northeastern Algeria. Stratigraphic, lithological, structural and metallogenic similarities, suggest the DHIF formation may extend further into southwestern Tunisia. We show that mineralization occurs as layers of oolitic iron ore and inter-laminated iron marl within mid-Eocene gypsiferous marls. The more or less rounded, brownish-blackish oolites, of 2.0-100s of mm in dimension, are predominated by goethite, limonite, hematite, with traces of magnetite and piemontite. The grains display a smooth outer surface bound by an argilo-ferruginous layer embedded in siliceous-calcite cement. They are unusually friable, crumbling at the slightest shock. A high total iron (FeT) content of 50.12%, is dominated by up to 71.06% iron hydroxide (FeO(OH). Much of the iron is present as goethite, a common feature of iron-rich ooliths of North African origin. However, the lack of prominent chlorite minerals suggest the DHIF is not of a detrital origin. Instead, a negligible Ti and Al oxide concentration suggest a chemical provenance for the DHIF. The data suggest that ferruginous conditions developed in a potentially restricted/semi-restricted continental shelf margin where seafloor redox was sensitive to the alternating cycles of sea level change. We propose a new mechanism for the formation of oolitic iron ores, associated with shelf surface water eutrophication, bottom water anoxia promoted by sea level rise and the weathering of iron phosphate-rich rocks. Phosphorus and cerium enrichment, coupled to reconstructed redox depositional conditions and sediment mineralogy, suggest that intense biomass production stimulated the deoxygenation of shelf bottom waters and the deposition of the DHIF beneath a ferruginous water column.

Meetings International - Earth Science 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Wolde E. Biruk photo

Wolde E. Biruk

Debre Berhan University, Ethiopia

Title: Assessment and mitigation of slope stability hazards along Kombolcha- desse road, northern ethiopia

Biography:

Buruk Wolde-Michael currently works at the Department of History and Heritage Management, Jimma University. Buruk does research in History of Religion, History of Art and Cultural History. His current project is 'Heritages and Heritage Sites of Ethiopia.'

Abstract:

The Kombolcha to Desse road, linking Addis Ababa with Northern Ethiopia towns traverses through one of the most difficult mountainous ranges in Ethiopia. The presence of loose unconsolidated materials (colluvium materials), highly weathered and fractured basalt rocks, high relief, steep natural slopes, nature of geologic formations exposed along the road section, poor drainage conditions, occurrence of high seasonal rains and seismically active nature of the region created favorable condition for slope instability in the area. Thus, keeping in mind all above points, the present study was conceived to study in detail the slope stability condition of the area. It was realized that detailed slope stability studies along this road section are very necessary to identify critical slopes and to provide the best remedial measures to minimize the slope instability problems which frequently disrupt and endanger the traffic movement on this important road. For the present study based on the field manifestation of instability, two most critical slope sections were identified for detailed slope stability analysis. The deterministic slope stability analysis approach was followed to perform the detailed slope stability analysis of the selected slope sections. Factor of safety for the selected slope sections was determined for the different anticipated conditions (i.e., static and dynamic with varied water saturations) using Slope/W and Slide software. Both static and seismic slope stability analysis was carried out and factor of safety was deduced for each anticipated conditions. In general, detailed slope stability analysis of the two critical slope sections reveals that for only static dry condition both the slopes sections would be stable. However, for the rest anticipated conditions defined by static and dynamic situations with varied water saturations both critical slope sections would be unstable. Moreover, the causes of slope instability in the study area are governed by different factors; therefore integrated approaches of remedial measures are more appropriate to mitigate the possible slope instability in the study area. Depending on site condition and slope stability analysis result 4 types of suitable preventive and remedial measures are recommended namely; proper managements of drainages, retaining structures, gabions and managing steeply cut slopes.