International Meeting on

Traditional & Alternative Medicine

Osaka, Japan   July 23-24, 2018

Traditional Medicine 2018

Osaka, Japan July 23-24, 2018

Theme: Exploring New Horizons in Traditional & Alternative Medicine

Meetings International proudly announces “International Meeting on Traditional & Alternative Medicine” scheduled on July 23-24, 2018 Osaka Japan. The theme of the meeting is "Exploring New Horizons in Traditional & Alternative Medicine". 

Meetings International welcomes you to the ‘International Meeting on Traditional & Alternative Medicine’ to be held on July 23-24, 2018 Osaka Japan. Meeting International organizes 1000+ Global events inclusive of 300+ International Conferences every year across the globe.

This Meeting will provide a broad range of academic disciplines in natural product which will be emphasized from the discovery of natural products from natural sources through the clinical uses to attract researchers that are contributing in the field of traditional and alternative medicine. It includes a wide range of Keynote presentations, Oral talks, Poster presentations, Symposia, Workshops, Exhibitions and Career development programs.

 

Why to Attend:

Traditional Medicine main slogan is to address the challenges in making a safer, sustainable and affordable system for medication, and health through consolidating the underpinning Alternative Medicine research platforms. Researcher and Expertise who’s in these subjects need in-depth understanding. It’s important to share knowledge with others due to newly generated problem. For that they need a platform to share their knowledge. We could say we create a golden opportunity for those people expose their knowledge through this conference.

In addition to attending the conference, we invite you to experience Osaka, the beautiful and famous city in Japan, which attracts people from around the world.

 

Target Audience:

Medical Practitioners

Ayurveda Practitioners

Homeopathy Practitioners

Acupuncturists

Herbal Medicine

Acupuncture Practitioners

Traditional Medicine Practitioners

Naturopathic Physicians

Natural therapists

Business/Practice Managers

Associations, Societies and Universities

For more details: http://www.meetingsint.com/conferences/traditional-medicine

 

Why Japan?

Japan is an important player on the international stage. The complementary Traditional medicines industry exports to more than 26 countries, including Germany, Norway, South Africa, Switzerland, Vietnam, Indonesia and Japan. The survey highlighted that over 60 per cent of complementary medicines companies (excluding retailers) are engaged in exporting. In this, the Asian Century, Australia’s trade focus is naturally directed towards the Asian region. All top five trading partners belong to the Asia-Pacific region and all but two places in the top tenure occupied by Asia-Pacific nations.

Track 1: Traditional Medicine Today: Clinical and Research Issues

Traditional and Alternative Medicine covers all the aspects of the modernization and standardization Clinical and Experimental research e.g. chemistry, pharmacology, molecular mechanism, systems biology, proteomics, genomics, metabolomics, safety, quality control, clinical studies of traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, Unani, Arabic and other ethnomedicine. Each issue contains updated comprehensive in-depth reviews along with high quality original experimental research articles.  Traditional and Alternative Medicine is a leading and important international peer-reviewed journal reflecting the current outstanding scientific Clinical and Experimental research progresses of the global traditional, indigenous, folk and ethnologic medicine. It provides a bridge connected the Tradition and Alternative Medicine system to the modern life science with the efforts of top scientists, as well as a resource to pursuit the solutions for the existing common issues in the traditional and alternative medicine.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 2Drugs from Natural Sources

In the most straightforward of terms, a natural product is a little molecule that is produced by a biological source. As a central theme of exploration bordering chemistry and biology, natural products research focuses on the chemical properties, biosynthesis and biological functions of secondary metabolites. In this context, the task of defining “natural” is more straight forward and encompasses isolation from a native organism, synthesis in a laboratory, biosynthesis in vitro, or isolation from a metabolically engineered organism whereby the chemical structure has been determined and the resultant compound is chemically equivalent to the original natural product.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 3: Molecular Biology, Biotechnology and Nanotechnology of Medicinal Plants

Molecular biology offers promising tools for the creation of novel crop varieties with improved nutritional value, resistance to herbicides, pests, diseases, pollutants and adverse climatic conditions.

Medicinal plants are the most important source of life saving drugs for the majority of the world's population. Plant optional metabolites are monetarily essential as medications, aromas, shades, sustenance added substances and pesticides. The biotechnological tools are important to select, multiply, improve and analyse medicinal plants. In-vitro production of secondary metabolites in plant cell suspension cultures has been reported from various medicinal plants and bioreactors are the key step towards commercial production of secondary metabolites by plant biotechnology. Genetic transformation is a capable device for upgrading the profitability of novel optional metabolites

The utilization of nanotechnology for "phytotherapy" or treatment of different ailments by natural medications/drugs, including home grown medication conveyance where present and developing nanotechnologies.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 4: Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry of Medicinal Plants

Pharmacognosy is the investigation of restorative medications got from plants or other common sources. The American Society of Pharmacognosy defines pharmacognosy as "the study of the physical, chemical, biochemical and biological properties of drugs, drug substances or potential drugs or drug substances of natural origin as well as the search for new drugs from natural sources.

Medicinal plants are a rich source of bioactive phytochemicals or bionutrients. Studies carried out during the past 2–3 decades have shown that these phytochemicals have an important role in preventing chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes and coronary heart disease. The real classes of phytochemicals with infection forestalling capacities are dietary fiber, cancer prevention agents, anticancer, detoxifying operators, insusceptibility potentiating specialists and neuropharmacological specialists. Each class of these functional agents consists of a wide range of chemicals with differing potency.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 5: Ethnomedicine and Traditional Medicine 

Ethnomedicine is a study or comparison of the traditional medicine practiced by various ethnic groups, and especially by indigenous peoples. The word ethnomedicine is sometimes used as a synonym for traditional medicine. Ethnomedical research is interdisciplinary; in its study of traditional medicines, it applies the methods of ethnobotany and medical anthropology. Often, the medicine traditions it studies are preserved only by oral tradition.

Scientific ethnomedical studies constitute either anthropological research or drug discovery research. Anthropological studies examine the cultural perception and context of a traditional medicine. The purpose of drug discovery research is to identify and develop a marketable pharmaceutical product.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 6: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is the mainstream term for wellbeing and health treatments that have commonly not been a piece of regular Western drug. Complementary means treatments that are used along with conventional medicine. Alternative means treatments used in place of conventional medicine.

CAM concentrates all in all individual and incorporates physical, passionate, mental and profound wellbeing. For example, CAM includes mind-body medicine (such as meditation, acupuncture and yoga), manipulative and body-based practices (such as massage therapy and spinal manipulation), and natural products (such as herbs and dietary supplements).

Most CAM studies in the U.S. show that few people forgo conventional medicine. So the term "integrative medicine" is increasingly preferred. Integrative medicine combines, or integrates, the best of conventional medical care with the best of evidence-based CAM.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 7: Traditional Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese Medicine is a healing system developed in China more than 2,200 years ago, incorporating therapies that are in some cases. One of its guiding principles is to dispel evil and support the good. In addition to treating illness, Traditional Chinese Medicine focuses on strengthening the body's defenses and enhancing its capacity for healing herbs and to maintain health.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

 

Track 8: Ayurveda

According to Ayurvedic hypothesis, everything in the universe living or not is connected. Good health is achieved when your body, mind, spirit are in harmony with the universe. A disruption of this harmony can lead to poor health and illness.

Anything that affects your physical, spiritual, or emotional well-being can cause you to be out of balance with the universe. Some things that can cause a disturbance include: Genetic birth defects, Injuries, Climate and seasonal changes, Emotions, Age.

How your body works to keep you healthy and your unique physical and psychological characteristics combine to form your body's constitution, or prakriti. prakriti is believed to stay the same for your entire life. But, how you digest food & eliminate waste can influence it.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 9: Folk Medicine and Remedies

Folk medicine is traditionally used as a term to describe healing skills that are associated with folk methods and that do not form part of formal medical training. This distinction is, however, primarily an academic construction and tells us little about the reality of everyday medicine as we are able to study it in a historical context.

In Norway we have a range of written sources that in various ways describe how people treated diseases in earlier periods. Descriptions of journeys, medicinal reports, decrees and laws, as well as books of black magic, are all examples of important sources for the study of diseases, treatments and therapists from the time following the Reformation.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 10: Medicinal Plant Product/Preparation

The utilization and scan for medications and dietary supplements got from plants have quickened as of late. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists, and characteristic items scientists are searching the Earth for phytochemicals and "leads" which could be produced for treatment of irresistible infections. While 25 to half of current pharmaceuticals are gotten from plants, none are utilized as antimicrobials. Conventional healers have since a long time ago utilized plants to forestall or cure irresistible conditions; Western drug is attempting to copy their victories. Plants are rich in a wide assortment of optional metabolites.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 11: Naturopathic Medicine

Naturopathic medicines and treatment are a distinct primary healthcare profession emphasizing prevention, treatment & optimal health care through the use of therapeutic methods and substances that encourage individuals inherent self-healing plants process. The practice of naturopathic medicines includes evidence based naturopathic medicines, modern and scientific, traditional, naturopathic treatments and practices and empirical methods.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 12: Herbal Medicine

Herbal medicine, also called botanical medicine or phytomedicine, refers to using a plant's seeds, berries, roots, leaves, bark, or flowers for medicinal purposes. Herbalism has a long tradition of use outside conventional medicine. It is becoming more mainstream as improvements in analysis and quality control, along with advances in clinical research, show the value of herbal medicine in treating and preventing disease.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 13: Herbal Remedies

A solution arranged from plants, including the greater part of the world's conventional solutions for illness. The vast majority consider natural cures as items sold over the counter as "supplements, for example, saw palmetto concentrate or goldenseal balm. Be that as it may, numerous over-the-counter and physician endorsed medications depend on fixings initially got from plants, including headache medicine and digoxin. Lab tests have demonstrated that some home grown cures are surely powerful against sickness. One ought to utilize these medications as painstakingly as physician recommended prescriptions, taking consideration to stay away from overdose, communications with different medicines, and abuse.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 14: Medical Anthropology

Medicinal Human sciences is a subfield of human sciences that draws upon, social, natural, and phonetic human studies to better comprehend those elements which impact wellbeing and prosperity (extensively characterized), the experience and dispersion of ailment, the avoidance and treatment of infection, mending forms, the social relations of treatment administration, and the social significance and use of pluralistic restorative frameworks.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 15: Herbal Cosmetics and Nutraceuticals

The herbal cosmetics are the arrangements containing phytochemical from an assortment of herbal sources, which impacts the elements of skin and give supplements important to the healthy skin or hair.

Nutraceuticals are food or part of food that provides medical or health benefits including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease. Nutraceutical has advantage over the prescription since they keep away from symptom, have normally dietary supplement, and so on. Nutraceutical; on the basis of their natural source, chemical grouping, categories into three key terms -nutrients, herbals, dietary supplements, dietary fiber, etc. The most rapidly growing segments of the industry were dietary supplements (19.5 percent per year) and natural/herbal products (11.6 percent per year). Global nutraceutical market is estimated as USD 117 billion. FDA regulated dietary supplements as foods to ensure that they were safe. In 2006, the Indian government passed Food Safety and Standard Act to regulate the nutraceutical industry. Herbal nutraceutical is used as a powerful instrument in maintaining health and to act against nutritionally induced acute and chronic diseases, thereby promoting optimal health, longevity, and quality of life.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 16: Patents and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in Herbal Medicine

Herbal products like all other products can also be protected from copying and get various forms of rights from the government. Since the rights are granted by the state for a property that has emanated from the use of mind or intellect these are called as intellectual property rights. Four different types of intellectual property rights (IPRs) are possible namely patents, trademarks, designs and copy rights.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 17: Research Ethics in Traditional Medicine

Governments, global offices and partnerships are progressively putting resources into customary home grown medication inquire about. Yet little literature addresses ethical challenges in this research. In this paper, we apply concepts in a comprehensive ethical framework for clinical research to international traditional herbal medicine research. We examine in detail three key, underappreciated dimensions of the ethical framework in which particularly difficult questions arise for international herbal medicine research: social value, scientific validity and favorable risk–benefit ratio. Noteworthy difficulties exist in deciding shared ideas of social esteem, logical legitimacy and positive risk– advantage proportion crosswise over worldwide research joint efforts. However, we argue that collaborative partnership, including democratic deliberation, offers the context and process by which many of the ethical challenges in international herbal medicine research can, and should be, resolved. By “cross-training” investigators, and investing in safety-monitoring infrastructure, the issues identified by this comprehensive framework can promote ethically sound international herbal medicine research that contributes to global health.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 18: Quality Control and Marketing of Herbal Products

Phytotherapeutic specialists are institutionalized home grown arrangements comprising of complex blends of at least one plant which contain as dynamic fixings plant parts or plant material in the unrefined or prepared state. A checked development in the overall phytotherapeutic advertises has happened in the course of the most recent 15 years. For the European and USA advertises alone, this will reach about $7 billion and $5 billion for every annum, separately, in 1999, and has in this way pulled in light of a legitimate concern for most huge pharmaceutical organizations. Inadequate information exists for most plants to ensure their quality, viability and wellbeing. The possibility that home grown medications are sheltered and free from symptoms is false. Plants contain many constituents and some of them are extremely harmful, for example, the most cytotoxic against tumor plant-determined medications, digitalis and the pyrrolizidine alkaloids, and so forth. In any case, the unfriendly impacts of phytotherapeutic operators are less continuous contrasted and engineered drugs, yet very much controlled clinical trials have now affirmed that such impacts truly exist. A few administrative models for home grown pharmaceuticals are presently accessible including physician recommended drugs, over-the-counter substances, conventional solutions and dietary supplements.

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Track 19: Toxicology Studies of Plant Products

They Consists of a few noteworthy parts, for example, Ayurveda, Siddha, homeopathy and Chemoprevention of ailments by plant items and unani drugs for the treatment of CNS and mind issue. Restorative plants constitute a noteworthy part in these conventional frameworks. A few regulations and controls on the utilization of therapeutic plants in conventional solution have advanced in the present survey; we gathered and basically examined information on in the anticipation of danger of hostile to disease drugs. The utilization of the word Toxicokinetics has changed in the course of the most recent decade and it is currently utilized, especially in the pharmaceutical business, to depict the era of pharmacokinetic information as a necessary segment in the behavior of nonclinical poisonous quality studies. The goal is to depict the systemic introduction to the test substance in creatures and its relationship to dosage level and the time course of the Toxicokinetics, creatures' models and measurement bunches

Related conferences & societies: International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR), Society for Ethnopharmacology, Herb Society of America, Indian board of Alternative Medicine, Research council for Complementary Medicine, Natural Health Products Research Society of Canada, Australian Traditional Medicine Association (ATMS), The Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture UK, European Herbal & Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association National Association, Japan Institute of Traditional Medicine, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF), German Agency for Quality in Medicine, Irish Medical Organization, Royal Society of Medicine, The International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), World Health Organization (WHO)

Traditional medicines are naturally occurring, with minimal or no industrial processing that have been used to treat illness within local or regional healing practices. Traditional medicines are getting significant attention in global health debates. Eighty per cent of African populations use some form of traditional medicine and the worldwide annual market for these products approaches US$ 60 billion. WHO have all made substantial research investments in traditional herbal medicines. Traditional Medicine products in Japan posted current value growth of 1% in 2016 to reach sales of JPY382 billion. While herbal/traditional cough, cold and allergy remedies, herbal/traditional dermatological and herbal/traditional dietary supplements registered an increase in sales, all other categories posted a decline. Herbal/traditional dietary supplements remained the largest category, accounting for a 60% share of overall value sales. Traditional Medicinal products is projected to record a value CAGR of 1% at constant 2016 prices over the forecast period, with sales set to reach JPY392 billion in 2021. Herbal/traditional dietary supplements will remain the most important herbal/traditional products as a result of the growing elderly population and rising awareness of disease prevention.

The global acceptance and use of traditional medicines and related products continue to assume exponential increase. It is being used more frequently all over the world. However most often these are choices made by the patient. Integrating TM into mainstream health care would require research to understand the efficacy, safety, and mechanism of action of TM systems. According to the World Health Organization atlas (2002), “traditional medicine (TM)” refers to health practices, approaches, knowledge, and beliefs incorporating plant, animal, and mineral based medicines, spiritual therapies, and manual techniques applied individually or in combination to treat, diagnose, and prevent illnesses or maintain wellbeing. According to the WHO, the quantity and quality of safety and efficacy data on TM are not sufficient to meet the criteria needed to support its use worldwide.

List of Universities in the World:

Heidelberg University

Rwth Aachen University

Lübeck University

Witten/Herdecke University

Ashford University

University of Bridgeport

University of Westminster

London Metropolitan University

Australian institute of Holistic Medicine

New Zealand School of Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine

Top research universities:

Massachusetts institute of technology

University of California at Los Angeles

Johns Hopkins University

Texas A & M University

Princeton University

California institute of technology – Caltech

Yale University

Cornell University

Georgia Institute of Technology

Emory University

Stanford University

Northwestern University

University Of California – Berkeley

Columbia University

Funding Bodies in Global Health:

Directory of Non-NIH Funding Opportunities – Grants and Fellowships (www.fic.nih.gov)

Yale/Stanford Johnson & Johnson Global Health Scholars Program (www.medicine.yale.edu)

The O.C. Huber Student Fellowship in International Health (www.cdc.gov)

Mabelle Arole Fellowship (www.amsa.org)

The Commonwealth Fund Mongan Fellowship in Minority Health Policy (mfdp.med.harvard.edu)

Association of Schools & Programs of Public Health (ASPPH)/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Allan Rosenfield Global Health Fellowship (www.aspph.org)

U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Global Health Fellows II Program (GHFP) (www.ghfp.net)

Future scope of traditional medicine:

A traditional health care practice of indigenous people pertaining to human health is termed as Ethnomedicine. The knowledge of certain herbs, animals and minerals that have curative and palliative effects were transmitted from one generation to another and it is the outcome of bold experimentation through trial and error method over hundreds of years. Ethnomedicine is the mother of all other systems of medicine such as Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani, Nature cure and even modern medicine. Folklorists, anthropologists and medical scientists alike are studying traditional medicine or ethnomedicine in some countries like Russia, Africa and few European countries3. In Russia particularly serious attempts have been made in the post revolution period to scientifically investigate the natural and herbal remedies of native medicine. It is understood that in Russia if a good home remedy is found for any serious ailment it is usually publicized and praised at the highest medical level. The contribution made by the traditional medicine to modern system of medicine is worth noting. As herbal medicine is the first level of contact for rural people when they require medical care, it is imperative for governments to take immediate steps to introduce the use of traditional medicine to supplement PHC. The government should provide environment to the people.

Conclusion:

One of the simplest and most effective ways to significantly lower health care costs and thus increase access is through a major focus on preventive medicine. In this clinical arena, many of the alternative health care systems may have much to offer. Homeopathic and naturopathic physicians, for example, strongly advise their patients about diet and other health-promoting lifestyle choices as a matter of routine care. In contrast, many conventional physicians do not routinely give such advice until a patient has already become chronically ill, by which time the patient may need expensive high-tech surgery and face a lifetime of expensive drug therapy. The widespread use of CAM therapies has implications not only for research but also for the education of conventional health care professionals. Health care professionals need to be informed about CAM and knowledgeable enough to discuss with their patients the CAM therapies that their patients are using or thinking of using.

References:

http://www.niscair.res.in/sciencecommunication/researchjournals/rejour/ijtk/Fulltextsearch/2003/July%202003/IJTK-Vol%202(3)-July%202003-pp%20236-239.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3722488/

http://www.nyrnaturalnews.com/article/acknowledging-the-value-of-traditional-use-in-herbal-medicine/

http://nopr.niscair.res.in/bitstream/123456789/25928/1/IJTK%202%283%29%20236-239.pdf

http://www.aafp.org/patient-care/global-health/education/scholarships-funding.html

  • Traditional Medicine Today: Clinical and Research Issues
  • Drugs from Natural Sources
  • Molecular Biology, Biotechnology and Nanotechnology of Medicinal Plants
  • Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry of Medicinal Plants
  • Ethnomedicine and Traditional Medicine
  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Ayurveda
  • Folk Medicine and Remedies
  • Medicinal Plant Product/Preparation
  • Naturopathic Medicine
  • Herbal Medicine
  • Herbal Remedies
  • Medical Anthropology
  • Herbal Cosmetics and Nutraceuticals
  • Patents and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in Herbal Medicine
  • Research Ethics in Traditional Medicine
  • Quality Control and Marketing of Herbal Products
  • Toxicology Studies of Plant Products