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February 20, 2021 at 09:30 AM GMT  
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Webinar on Vaccine Research and Development is delighted to welcome the participants from all over the world to be a part of the webinar. Vaccine Research Webinar is scheduled on February 20, 2021 . This webinar will be organized around the theme "A Global discussion on Vaccine Research & Development"This webinar gives an opportunity to network with your colleagues from across the globe exchanging ideas with expertise and to arm yourself with the latest information. Our webinar will introduce sessions which will feature leading edge displays, special panel discussions, and livelier interaction with Vaccine specialists from across the globe.

 

 

Session 1: HUMAN VACCINES INFECTIOUS DISEASES

vaccine is an inactivated form of bacteria or virus that is injected into the body to simulate an actual infection. Because the injected microorganisms are 'dead,' they don't cause a person to become sick. Instead, vaccines stimulate an immune response by the body that will fight off that type of illness. It covers infectious disease targets and non-infectious disease targets. To generate vaccine-mediated protection is a complex challenge. Currently available vaccines have largely been developed empirically, with little or no understanding on how they activate the immune system. Their early protective efficacy is primarily conferred by the induction of antigen-specific antibodies. However, there is more to antibody-mediated protection than the peak of vaccine-induced antibody titers.

Session 2: CANCER VACCINE

Cancer Vaccine is a vaccine that either treats existing cancer or prevents development of cancer. Vaccines that treat existing cancer are known as therapeutic cancer vaccines. Some/many of the vaccines are "autologous", being prepared from samples taken from the patient, and are specific to that patient.Some researchers claim that cancerous cells routinely arise and are destroyed by the immune system (immunosurveillance); and that tumors form when the immune system fails to destroy them. Some types of cancer, such as cervical cancer and liver cancer, are caused by viruses (oncoviruses). Traditional vaccines against those viruses, such as the HPV vaccine and the hepatitis B vaccine, prevent those types of cancer. Other cancers are to some extent caused by bacterial infections (e.g. stomach cancer and Helicobacter pylori). 

Session 3: INFLUENZA VACCINE/VIRUS

Influenza virus (commonly known as "the flu") is a serious disease caused by a virus. Influenza virus can spread from one person to another through small droplets of saliva that are expelled into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The virus can also be passed through contact with objects the infected person has touched, such as a door handle or other surfaces.Influenza virus vaccine is used to prevent infection caused by influenza virus. The vaccine is redeveloped each year to contain specific strains of inactivated (killed) flu virus that are recommended by public health officials for that year.The injectable influenza virus vaccine (flu shot) is a "killed virus" vaccine. Influenza virus vaccine is also available in a nasal spray form, which is a "live virus" vaccine.Influenza virus vaccine works by exposing you to a small dose of the virus, which helps your body to develop immunity to the disease. 

Session 4: THERAPEUTIC VACCINATION

therapeutic vaccine is a vaccine which is administered after the disease or infection has already occurred. The therapeutic vaccine works by activating immune system of the patient to fight towards infection. The difference in therapeutic vaccine and vaccine is that vaccines are administered to individuals as a precautionary measure to avoid the infection or disease while therapeutic vaccines are administered after the individual is already affected by the disease or infection. Therapeutic vaccine fights the existing infection in the body rather than immunizing the body for protection against future diseases and infections. The therapeutic vaccines are mostly against viral infections. The patients affected with chronic viral infections are administered with therapeutic vaccines, as their immune system is not able to produce enough efficient antibodies.

 Session 5: HIV/AIDS VACCINES

The long-term goal is to develop a safe and effective vaccine that protects people worldwide from acquiring HIV. However, even if a vaccine only protects some people who get vaccinated, or even if it provides less than total protection by reducing the risk of infection, it could still have a major impact on the rates of transmission and help control the pandemic, particularly for populations at high risk of getting HIV. A partially effective vaccine could decrease the number of people who get infected with HIV, further reducing the number of people who can pass the virus on to others. By substantially reducing the number of new infections, we can stop the epidemic.

 

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