International conference on

Aquaculture & Marine Biology

Rome, Italy   June 25-27, 2018

Theme: New Advancements in Aquaculture & Marine Biology

Aqua Conference is delighted to welcome the participants from all over the world to attend the prestigious International Conference on Aquaculture & Marine Biology scheduled during June 25-27, 2018 in Rome, Italy. The conference provides the global coliseum to international scholars and researchers to voice their research findings to the world. With representatives from all the major aquaculture countries in attendance the atmosphere is exciting with open and friendly interaction between attendees. This is a conference, providing an opportunity for the aquaculture & marine biology industry to learn about current and upcoming issues, explore new developments in culture technology, and interact with others with similar interests.

Meetings International (Meetings Int.) is a global leader in producing high quality conferences, meetings, workshops and symposia in all major fields of science, technology and medicine. Since its inception, Meetings Int. has been associated with national and international associations, corporations and high level individuals, dedicated to host world class conferences and events. Meetings Int. supports broad scope research and peer review at a broad range of specialists around the world.

This conference brings together a unique and international mix of experts like academicians, scientists, and business professionals, general public, current and prospective fish farmers to share information and ideas about the development of aquaculture & marine biology. Attendees will learn about several topics relevant to aquaculture & marine biology, and find out about the latest aquaculture equipment and products by browsing the ongoing Exhibition. Anyone with an interest in aquaculture, marine science, including prospective growers, researchers, teachers, students or agency persons with jobs related to aquaculture & marine biology can attend the conference. The conference is also suited to persons who sell goods or services to the aquaculture & marine biology industry.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 1: Aquatic Ecosystem & Aqua Farming

Ecology is the scientific study of how organisms interact with each other and with their environment. This includes relationships between individuals of the same species, between different species, and between organisms and their physical and chemical environments. Aquatic ecology includes the study of these relationships in all aquatic environments, including oceans, estuaries, lakes, ponds, wetlands, rivers, and streams. The boundaries of an aquatic ecosystem are somewhat arbitrary, but generally enclose a system in which inflows and outflows can be estimated. Ecosystem ecologists study how nutrients, energy, and water flow through an ecosystem.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 2: Sustainable Aquaculture

Aquaculture is currently playing, and will continue to play, a big part in boosting global fish production and in meeting rising demand for fishery products. Aquaculture is projected to be the prime source of seafood as demand grows from the global middle class and wild capture fisheries approach their maximum take.  Sustainable aquaculture is a dynamic concept and the sustainability of an aquaculture system will vary with species, location, societal norms and the state of knowledge and technology.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 3: Aquaponics

Aquaponics refers to any system that combines conventional aquaculture (raising aquatic animals such as snails, fish, crayfish or prawns in tanks) with hydroponics (cultivating plants in water) in a symbiotic environment. In normal aquaculture, excretions from the animals being raised can accumulate in the water, increasing toxicity. In an aquaponic system, water from an aquaculture system is fed to a hydroponic system where the by-products are broken down by nitrifying bacteria initially into nitrites and subsequently into nitrates, which are utilized by the plants as nutrients, and the water is then recirculated back to the aquaculture system.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 4: Aquatic Diseases & Immunity

Aquaculture is the fastest growing sector of animal protein production and now accounts for 47-50 percent of the world's aquatic animal food supply. Aquaculture production helps to reduce pressure on wild fisheries caused by overfishing. Diseases have emerged as a significant problem due to the high stocking densities used in intensive aquaculture. These diseases may devastate the farmed aquatic animals and spread to wild populations.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 5: Aquaculture Nutrition & Supplies

Aquaculture Nutrition provides a global perspective on the nutrition of all cultivated aquatic animals. Fish are consumed as food by many species, including humans. It has been an important source of protein and other nutrients for humans throughout recorded history. Health experts have long touted the nutritional benefits of fish: These sea creatures rank high on lists of the best sources of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, high-quality protein, metabolism-friendly selenium, energy-boosting Vitamin B12, and inflammation-fighting Vitamin D. Omega-3s are essential nutrients that help ward off heart disease, diabetes, and metabolism-slowing inflammation, and they’re primarily found in fish.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 6: Aquaculture Genetics & Biotechnology

Genetic analyses have much to offer fisheries managers, especially in the provision of tools enabling unequivocal specimen identification and assessment of stock structure. Biotechnology provides powerful tools for the sustainable development of aquaculture, fisheries, as well as the food industry. Increased public demand for seafood and decreasing natural marine habitats have encouraged scientists to study ways that biotechnology can increase the production of marine food products, and making aquaculture as a growing field of animal research. Biotechnology allows scientists to identify and combine traits in fish and shellfish to increase productivity and improve quality. Scientists are investigating genes that will increase production of natural fish growth factors as well as the natural defense compounds marine organisms use to fight microbial infections.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 7: Aquatic Health and Hygiene

Monitoring and management of aquatic animal health is important in many situations including the aquaculture industry, in ornamental species and also for wild populations of fish and shellfish. Health management is a critical issue in the aquaculture industry, as an intensive culture of animals and plants (both on land and in the water) can increase the likelihood of disease. A disease outbreak can devastate farmed populations and severely impact the short-term profitability and even long-term viability of aquaculture businesses. Those who keep ornamental fish and invertebrates for a hobby also frequently confront disease issues, and need to be scrupulous in managing the health of their animals and preventing any diseases that do occur from spreading to other aquaria or even the wild through the transfer of sick animals or contaminated water and materials. Outbreaks of the disease also occur in the wild, where they can cause unsightly and unhealthy fish kills or even endanger populations of certain native species. In all cases, a quick response is essential to enable correct diagnosis of the problem and to allow for appropriate measures to be taken, whether this be quarantine, treatment and/or euthanasia of the affected population.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 8: Fisheries Biology & Management

The primary goal of Fisheries conservation is to restore fish populations that have been eliminated because of pollution or habitat destruction. Fisheries management draws on fisheries science in order to find ways to protect fishery resources so sustainable exploitation is possible. Modern fisheries management is often referred to as a governmental system of appropriate management rules based on defined objectives and a mix of management means to implement the rules, which are put in place by a system of monitoring control and surveillance.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 9: Marine Biology

Marine biology is the scientific study of organisms in the sea. Marine biology classifies species based on the environment rather than on taxonomy. Many species are economically important to humans, including both finfish and shellfish. It is also becoming understood that the well-being of marine organisms and other organisms are linked in fundamental ways. The human body of knowledge regarding the relationship between life in the sea and important cycles is rapidly growing, with new discoveries being made nearly every day.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 10: Marine Life & Conservation

Marine life is a vast resource, providing food, medicine, and raw materials, in addition to helping to support recreation and tourism all over the world. Marine life helps determine the very nature of our planet. Marine organisms contribute significantly to the oxygen cycle, and are involved in the regulation of the Earth's climate. Shorelines are in part shaped and protected by marine life, and some marine organisms even help create new land.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 11: Coral Reefs

Coral reefs are diverse underwater ecosystems held together by calcium carbonate structures secreted by corals. Coral reefs are built by colonies of tiny animals found in marine water that contain few nutrients. Most coral reefs are built from stony corals, which in turn consist of polyps that cluster in groups. The polyps belong to a group of animals known as Cnidaria, which also includes sea anemones and jellyfish. Coral reefs deliver ecosystem services to tourism, fisheries and shoreline protection. The annual global economic value of coral reefs is estimated between US$30–375 billion.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Session 12: Freshwater Biology

Freshwater biology is the scientific biological study of freshwater ecosystems and is a branch of limnology. This field seeks to understand the relationships between living organisms in their physical environment. These physical environments may include rivers, lakes, streams, or wetlands. This discipline is also widely used in industrial processes to make use of biological processes such as sewage treatment and water purification. Water flow is an essential aspect to species distribution and influence when and where species interact in freshwater environments.

Aquaculture Conference | Marine Biology Conference | Aquaculture Meeting | Aquaculture & Marine Biology Conference | Fisheries Conference | Marine Science Conference | Aquatic Science Conference | Fisheries Science Meeting

Introduction:

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food production system in the world due to the lack of naturally available varieties of fisheries harvested in natural environments. The increasing awareness of the health benefits and nutritional value associated with seafood has accelerated its consumption. Aquatic products, especially farmed salmon and shrimps, are highly nutritious sources of food, consisting of important proteins, vitamins A, B, D, and Niacin, minerals like iodine, iron, phosphorus, and zinc. These foods also have a significant source of Omega-3 fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA).

Aquaculture in Europe:

In Europe, aquaculture accounts for about 20% of fish production and directly employs some 85 000 people. The sector is mainly composed of SMEs or micro-enterprises in coastal and rural areas. Europe aquaculture is renowned for its high quality, sustainability and consumer protection standards. Europe overall output has been more or less constant in volume since 2000 whereas global production, at the same time, has been growing by nearly 7% per year. The European Commission has launched a number of campaigns to promote sustainable aquaculture in the EU.

Aquaculture in America:

Marine aquaculture in the United States contributes to seafood supply, supports commercial fisheries, restores habitat and at-risk species, and maintains economic activity in coastal communities and at working waterfronts in every coastal state. Aquaculture also supports commercial and recreational fisheries. About 40% of the salmon caught in Alaska and 80-90% in the Pacific Northwest start their lives in a hatchery - contributing over 270 million dollars to the commercial fishery.

Aquaculture in Middle East:

With seven seas surrounding the region, including the Mediterranean, the Persian Gulf, the Gulf of Aden, the Red Sea, the Black Sea, the Caspian Sea and the Arabian Sea, the Middle East is not short of sources for fresh seafood. However, total production in the region amounts to only 2.17% of the total worldwide production. Capture fisheries are characterized by a large number of small-scale fishers, with it estimated that the small-scale sector provides about 80 to 90% of the total landings.

Aquaculture in Asia:

According to official statistics, production in a number of Asia-Pacific fisheries peaked in the last two decades and is now stable or declining, depending on the area being fished. Highly intensive fishing, especially in trawl fisheries, targeting shrimp and other demersal species has also led to a change in catch composition. The share in landings of fast growing and short-lived species and the catch of small-sized juveniles of commercially important fish species is steadily increasing (so-called “fishing down the food chain”).

Aquaculture in Italy:

Aquaculture in Italy is based on a long tradition and history. It is characterized by a high level of specialization and large-scale production. In 2014, the total output of the Italian aquaculture sector amounted to 149,000 tonnes. Shellfish producing companies account for over 50 % of the total number of farms and contribute to 63 % of total aquaculture production. In the shellfish sector, blue mussels (96,000 tonnes) and cross-cut carpet shell (30,000 tonnes) are the main species. Finfish farming is divided into freshwater fish species and marine species. Production of the marine farmed fish amounts to 28,100 tonnes, where seabream (9,400 tonnes) and seabass (7,900 tonnes) are the main farmed species. In the freshwater fish segment, there were 311 registered farms in 2013, located primarily in the north and central regions of Italy. The output of freshwater farmed fish amounts to 40,700 tonnes, of which rainbow trout (37,800 tonnes) has the major share, followed by sturgeon (1,700 tonnes) and European eel (1,200 tonnes). 

The national aquaculture sector is dominated by small enterprises with less than 5 employees. Total employment in the aquaculture sector comprises 5,164 persons, of whom 1,937 hold full time positions. Full-time employment is about 38 % of the total employment in the Italian aquaculture sector, highlighting the importance of seasonal work. The shellfish sector is the most important, accounting for 3,774 persons employed, equal to 74 % of the total work force. Male employment is predominant in the national aquaculture sector with about 84 % male employees.

Global Aquaculture & Marine Biology Universities:

  • University of Bologna, Italy
  • University of Florence, Italy
  • Marconi University, Italy
  • Kyoto University, Japan
  • Ehime University, Japan
  • Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Japan
  • Hokkaido University, Japan
  • Wageningen University, Netherlands
  • University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Natioanl Taiwan Ocean University, Taiwan
  • Playmouth University, UK
  • University of Aberdeen, UK
  • University of Stirling, UK
  • University of Hall, UK
  • The Swire Institute of Marine Science, Hong Kong
  • Texas A&M University, USA
  • University of Maine, USA
  • Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada
  • Dalhousie University, Canada
  • Norwegian University of Life sciences, Norway

Global Aquaculture & Marine Biology Societies:

  • World Aquaculture Society, USA
  • American Fisheries Society, USA
  • U. S. Aquaculture Society, USA
  • National Aquaculture Association, USA
  • Asian Fisheries Society, Malaysia
  • Aquaculture Association of Canada, Canada
  • Aquaculture Association of S. Africa, South Africa
  • European Aquaculture Society, Europe
  • Brazilian Aquaculture Society (AQUABIO), Brazil
  • Indonesian Aquaculture Society, Indonesia
  • Society of Aquaculture Professionals, India
  • Malaysian Fisheries Society, Malaysia
  • Egyptian Aquaculture Society, Egypt
  • Spanish Aquaculture Association (SEA), Spain

Conclusion:

Aquaculture is one of the fastest growing food production sectors in the world. More importantly, it is a fundamental element in the global solution to provide a sustainable seafood source. The addition of aquaculture to help satisfy fish demand helps natural stock population and growth, lessening the strain on stressed fisheries.

References:

http://www.fao.org/in-action/globefish/fishery-information/resource-detail/en/c/338542/

http://www.fao.org/in-action/globefish/fishery-information/papers-and-more/en/

http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/aquaculture/homepage_stories/18_marine_aquaculture_infographic.html

https://ec.europa.eu/fisheries/cfp/aquaculture_en

http://www.fao.org/3/a-i5555e.pdf

http://www.fao.org/fishery/countrysector/naso_usa/en

https://www.eurofish.dk/index.php/italy

  • Aquatic Ecosystem & Aqua Farming
  • Sustainable Aquaculture
  • Aquaponics
  • Aquatic Diseases & Immunity
  • Aquaculture Nutrition & Supplies
  • Aquaculture Genetics & Biotechnology
  • Aquatic Health and Hygiene
  • Fisheries Biology & Management
  • Marine Biology
  • Marine Life & Conservation
  • Coral Reefs
  • Freshwater Biology

1 Organizing Committee Members

Media Partners & Collaborations

  • Media Partner

  • Media Partner